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Registered: 12/24/99
Posts: 8,946
Re: A discusion on the spread of species.
    #77220 - 07/25/00 09:29 PM (16 years, 3 months ago)

You are one confused little person there Lizard.

heheheh Im joking.

The weather is a very important aspect of it. Florida is of course a much more tropical enviroment than Georgia.

Also (and this is important), Florida is as flat as a pancake. Your going to find different mushrooms at different elevations...are entire state is just barely above sea level.

One other thing I can think of to add to my theory...something most important for florida mushrooms...two words...The Everglades :smile:

Later on Lizard, I hope some other people can help actually Answer your questions for you! heheheheh

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Registered: 07/22/99
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Re: A discusion on the spread of species.
    #77222 - 07/25/00 11:23 PM (16 years, 3 months ago)

Lizard King,

I would like to point out that Psilocybe cubensis is not native to Florida or the sourtheast.

This mushroom came in witht the manure of cattle brought to the Americas by the Spanish.

Both Terence mcKenna and I believe that the use of these shrooms may have originated in the Na Nan Tak region of Northeastern Thailand where the bones of Bos indicus has been uncovered in a digging in association with human bones.

This would place the mushrooms in that region at 15,000 bp.

And P. cubensis is common throughout central America, SOuth America Cuba (from where it was first botanically identified from) and some Islands in the Caribbean.

It is a tropical and pan-tropical species, however Psilocybe cubensis on the other hand is only known of from Mexico, Central and Couth America, Australia and Thailand.

See P. cubensis is common in Australia but is unknown in New Zealand. It fruits in Fiji but not in Samoa or Hawai'i where Copelandia species occur.

AS noted above Lizard King and others reading this thread, It has a world wide cosmopolitan distribution. It is interesting that Stropharia cubensis has not really been identified but from a few countries in Africa where the first American cattle came from.

The dung species of Copelandia's were introduced into the Hawai'ian Islands by cattle (Bos taurus, horses (Equus caballus), and/or perhaps by other alien ruminant herbivores. Cattle were introduced to Hawai'i by the British Captain George Vancourver in 1793 and 1794; horses were first introduced to hawai'i by 1803 aboard a merchant ship under the command of Captain William Shaler.


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OfflineLizard King
King Lizard

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Re: A discusion on the spread of species.
    #77223 - 07/26/00 12:04 PM (16 years, 2 months ago)

O.k. maybe that last post was a little lengthy and poorly worded, it was an herbal thing at the time.

I know that P.cubensis grows throughout various parts of the world. My question was mainly about your story of the friend who was able to fruit cubensis in the northwest by feeding spores to cows. If this is possible, then why don't they continue fruiting on their own once the spores are in the field. If they were able to fruit once, its obvious that the conditions were favorable. Now the spores are all over the field, but nothing grows unless you feed the cow spores. Why doesn't the cycle take its natural course once the spores have been introduced to the field?

Another example is P. azurescen. As far as I know, its native only to the northwest U.S. Now I know there is another location in this world where conditions favor P. azurescens, so why don't they grow anywhere else in the world? People are able to fruit azures in outdoor patches all over various parts of the country/world, yet the spores never take to a new home and spread on their own. Why?

The Lizard,

End the War on Drugs...Vote Libertarian


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Re: A discusion on the spread of species.
    #77224 - 07/26/00 04:07 PM (16 years, 2 months ago)

Coz i bet this dude picked all the mushrooms, if he would only let at least several flushes to acomplish a whole life cycle the shrooms whould be back.
dont ya think?

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Re: A discusion on the spread of species.
    #77225 - 07/26/00 11:57 PM (16 years, 2 months ago)

Kay... for all we know, cubensis IS moving, expanding it's habitat. It's inevitable that given enough time, this will in fact happen. But the spaniards only brought this species here .. what ... 4 or 5 hundred years ago. That's a drop in the preverbial bucket. Given enought time, this species will colonized, adapt and hybridize and reach further north and west... right now it's too cold up north, and too dry out west... you mention west texas.. too dry, my man...
And as for why someone got spores to germinate and fruit in cow turds a'la northwest only by feeding the spores to a cow... I would venture the hypothesis that the germination of the spores began, in this case, within the digestive tract of the cow in question. It is friendly, warm and wet. So buy the time the poop flies, the spores are already growing into mycelium. The most tenuous part of the mushroom's life cycle is already realized - the transformation from spore to fungus.. It is that mixture of heat and humidity which it is damn near impossible to replicate up here... and this is why that germination never (rarely) takes place in the wild in this neck of the woods.
Fruiting on the other hand, is easier for a warm weather fungus to achieve, it only needs appropriate moisture and a temperature spike. We got that by the truck load...
I, for example.. sponsor fruitings in my cubensis home-cultivar by leaving the fungus outside overnight. as long as it's not freezing... But I would never try GERMINATING out there in the 60 degree world, now would I?.... nooooo....

Azurescens.... well that's another story...
Geographically speaking the place to which it is native is pinched between the ocean, the mouth of one of the nation's biggest rivers, and a rather substantial mountain range.
Here's a continuation of my theory.. you take a ps. cyanescens, native originally to europe, and bring it to the pacific northwest in potted eurpoean plants like chamelias and rhodedenduns.. you let some of them fester in a specific area, with caustic, salty wet air, then a few decades later, add a couple of radioactive releases from the Hanford nuclear facility up river... and BANG! you got the flying saucer monkey batter shroom-to-beat-all-shrooms. p azurescens....

Anyway... this species, like most of the other psychoactive species up here are products of the introduction of foreign plants and or livestock, as the case may be with p. semileceata, and are therefore very very new to the area... people only 'civilized' this place about a hundred and 25 years ago, so give it time... off shore winds all almost certainly spreading this species up and down the coast of the pacific northwest and probably inland up the channel cut by the columbia river. I bet if we keep looking, before too long we will find it in places like Long Beach, Washington - then later Sequim, then Seattle then Vancouver BC..... Of course, MAN will probably help it along very nicely up and down the I-5 corridor...

hows that for an answer?


"Humanity is entering into a time of consequences" ---
- Winston Churchill

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Registered: 12/24/99
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Re: A discusion on the spread of species.
    #77226 - 07/27/00 12:26 PM (16 years, 2 months ago)

cubes dont grow in the north, just because thats how it is.

liberty caps dont grow in the south, cause thats just the way it is.

i havent magic mushroom hunted for three days now!!! to think of all those mushrooms i didnt whisk away to pardise...

So, Much, Rain.

TheGreatOne has Found (FOUND, I never collect them, I just snap a picture and then am on my merry little way) more mushrooms this summer than could ever possibly make sense. And to think if i actually collected them and decided to dry them out (of which i do not, i only photograph them im on my shroomy little way) LOL well then, i would have enough to trip out a good thousand people.

+*+*I should have grabbed a few of them along the way, now Im stuck with no mushrooms and just a whole lot a really nice florida shroom pictures*+*+

Show me someone whos taken better shroom pictures in florida than me and ill show you the most beautiful field florida has to offer.

Keep On Shroomin',
TheGreatOne of sarasota

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Mushrooms, Mycology and Psychedelics >> Mushroom Hunting and Identification

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