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Invisibleflowstone
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A guide to hunting edibles and actives in Georgia
    #4024329 - 04/07/05 02:01 AM (11 years, 8 months ago)

I am trying to compile information and stories about mushrooms in GA( or anywhere). Take what I have built, and build your own on top of it! Let's make this a wonderful season for all people.

I am going to try and mushroom hunt as much as I can this year in GA. With last year bringing me many kind things :mushroom2:, and a valuable lesson or two :sun:, I am going to embark on receiving the free gifts of nature this year and try to be more balanced in my pursuit.

I would like to cover several species in this thread and get ideas from all.

-Chanterelles!-

I love these wonderful orange mushrooms, I see them everywhere when they are in full season! From what I hear they are a tasteful delicacy when cooked, but pungent tasting when raw. I have found mostly the orange variety here in N GA, but twice I found the cinnabar variation of this mushroom. To save me some effort, can anyone off the top of their heads tell me when these mushrooms reach prime? if my memory serves me it is in the late prime of summer....? I would like to utilize this mushroom so if anyone has any idea let me know.

- Weilii-
How can anyone in N GA overlook this mushroom! One of the most potent and diversely unique species, this mushroom never ceases to amaze me. Almost stalking ME, I have been lucky in several finds of this mushroom god. This mushroom ranges from yard to yard and takes many shapes and colors( from almost white light brown to deep metallic silverish blue!!!) The key feature is the signature weilii smell that separates it from the rest. I am looking foreword to a good fall season( and maybe spring) and would like anyone and every-ones advice and input on this species.

-cubensis-

Lovely and abundant in N GA, contrary to some peoples view. Although our season is shorter than Florida and Texas, do not be fooled: This mushroom can produce endless fields of abundant cubes when the prime is right. This is probably the most sought after species by people on this website and active mushroom hunters in the south. Any tips, advice, or stories about this wonderful species :mushroom2: are welcomed!

-Panaeolus subbalteatus-
A mushroom I am sure I have found but never took home or eaten. This mushroom intrigues me, and although seldom do I see it, I wonder about its uses and how people in GA find them and if it is worth targeting. From what I hear rarely do they bruise blue and even if you find a bunch, you have to eat a bunch to feel effects.
I am curious if anyone sees any physical or spiritual advantages of taking a weaker mushroom verses a strong one. I've heard they even cause more nausea than cubes or weilii.
I really would like to understand this species more, so if you have first hand trip comparison to other species with this mushroom, or other knowledge let us know.


-Copelandia cyanescens-
Never have I found one of these illusive mushrooms! although I have found many of the closely similar( to someone who has never seen one) Panaeolus Artillum, never have I found a real copelandia.
I am very interested in the SPECIFICS of this mushroom, as in: what else is happening in nature in GA when this mushroom reaches the prime of it's season. Any help or information about this is welcome. This is the mushroom I hear very little about in GA.


Like I said, if you have general information not relevant to the state of GA but still pertaining to the topic, let me know.
Things needed mostly:
Similar nature activities when a mushroom reaches it's prime
Trip experience with each species,
Ideas for hunting and utilizing each species,
Specific information about a certain mushrooms features,
and other stories and helpful tips.

Also, if you have any specific questions I will be glad to share more of what(limited) amount I know about said species.  :sun:


--------------------
these long agonizing months without you...have been long and agonizing..
"War Doesn't Decide Who's Right... It Only Decides Who's Left."


Edited by flowstone (04/07/05 02:25 AM)


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Offlinemastacheefa
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Re: A guide to hunting edibles and actives in Georgia [Re: flowstone]
    #4025712 - 04/07/05 12:35 PM (11 years, 8 months ago)

Great post man! :bongload:

Also, what is up with weilii in the spring???? I cant seem to find/get a good answer for this.  Ive heard they grow in the spring, from reliable ga weilii hunters, but not near as much in the fall?  After doing a little research from past post I didnt find one person that claimed they found wild weilii in april or earlier.  Though the conditions seem perfect right now.  The earliest post I found was late may.  May 25 to be exact. 


Edited by mastacheefa (04/07/05 03:23 PM)


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OfflineLysergic_Milkman
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Re: A guide to hunting edibles and actives in Georgia [Re: mastacheefa]
    #4026826 - 04/07/05 04:56 PM (11 years, 8 months ago)

Right on!
i have the EXACT same idea.
we should meet up. I live in Cobb county, NW GA (powder springs to be specific).
I havnt found C. cyanescens either, not in 2 seasons  :frown:

Similar nature activities: FIddle heads and certain cup fungi bein to appear around the same time as morels do (credit to Gumby), also i have noticed that earth worms [primarily] and other bugs can be found in cattle dung when shrooms are NOT growing, but can still be found to a much lesser extent when they are growing.

Ideas and Specifics: I have a red chaterelle patch in the woods next to my house; they are wonderful as a spice when raw, similar to a very hot pepper without the persisting acid burn, just hotness, quite pleasant. GREAT in omlets (chanterelle omlet, one of my favorite meals). Also, young chanterelles are firmer than mature specimens, which are less spicy and more sweet (faintly like an apricot or peach); both young and old have their own special uses, but i prefer the young'uns. They dont keep well when frozen!  :thumbdown:

There are also loads of different kinds of bolets, russulas and lactarius that i havnt identified yet (but i plan to this season, and document it well.


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OfflineLysergic_Milkman
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Re: A guide to hunting edibles and actives in Georgia [Re: Lysergic_Milkman]
    #4026842 - 04/07/05 04:59 PM (11 years, 8 months ago)

To Mastacheefa: sorry man i didnt see your post. I dont know anything about weiliis in spring, i actually heard they are more abundant in the fall season.


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Invisibleflowstone
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Re: A guide to hunting edibles and actives in Georgia [Re: mastacheefa]
    #4027798 - 04/07/05 08:28 PM (11 years, 8 months ago)

Interesting.
I agree, right now is just perfect for the Whales. Seemingly so, that is. With the hard freeze this winter and lots of cold weather we will need to see steady temps for weeks before the weilii come. But that should be soon, very soon I hope. As far as abundances, I don't have high hopes for spring, but I know one or two will be out.

L_M: thanks for the info on Chanterelles. Do you remember when the mushrooms hit peak point and were out in full force? Also good to know about freezing them.

Let's keep the information rolling. I would really like to hear some from the long time experts, but anyone and everyone can help!


--------------------
these long agonizing months without you...have been long and agonizing..
"War Doesn't Decide Who's Right... It Only Decides Who's Left."


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OfflineLysergic_Milkman
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Re: A guide to hunting edibles and actives in Georgia [Re: flowstone]
    #4028898 - 04/08/05 12:11 AM (11 years, 8 months ago)

Quote:

flowstone said:
Interesting.
I agree, right now is just perfect for the Whales. Seemingly so, that is. With the hard freeze this winter and lots of cold weather we will need to see steady temps for weeks before the weilii come. But that should be soon, very soon I hope. As far as abundances, I don't have high hopes for spring, but I know one or two will be out.

L_M: thanks for the info on Chanterelles. Do you remember when the mushrooms hit peak point and were out in full force? Also good to know about freezing them.

Let's keep the information rolling. I would really like to hear some from the long time experts, but anyone and everyone can help!




ummmm... I didnt know of any chanterelle patches in my area during the spring season last year, but i should soon discover when they peak. as for the fall seson, i only saw them for a few weeks in mid-late fall I think. Ill be sure to document it this season and get that info to you ASAP. I also found a gold chanterelle patch in my area but was a few days too late. the only one i found on my exploratory hunt was old and shriveled, but im sure it was a gold chanty. The typical habitat for red chantys seems to be under mostly deciduous trees, and in fairly crowded areas (tree-wise). rarely did i find them on the beaten path. The gold chanty was in a more open area on [or near] a log (i dont remember exactly), but it was fairly marshy, acidic soil. keep in mind that these are short term reports. the patterns my be merely coincidental.

i find P. subbalteatus quite frequently in cow manure (yes, im sure they are subbs). i dont know if this is typical to north georgia, to the field i go to, or if this is just a freak incident, but i will keep you updated. thought that was interesting.

Also, Old-Man-of-the-Woods shrooms grow frequently in georgia. edible, but i consider them more an eye catcher than a food...

Went hunting today for morels. no signs, but the cup and jelly fungi are out full force! first signs of forest shrooms ive seen.
(Note:4/7/05)


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Invisibleflowstone
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Re: A guide to hunting edibles and actives in Georgia [Re: Lysergic_Milkman]
    #4028981 - 04/08/05 12:39 AM (11 years, 8 months ago)

Quote:

The gold chanty was in a more open area on [or near] a log (i dont remember exactly), but it was fairly marshy, acidic soil.




I have noticed this too, I've found large patches in a small basin on a hill or at a low lying point. Most of the time the ones I find have been eaten, or at least started to be eaten by bugs. But then again what mushroom doen't like water. When the season is is bloom I see them everywhere, very common here in N GA.

Quote:

i find P. subbalteatus quite frequently in cow manure, i dont know if this is typical




I think so.. I've never found them on cow manure but have on decayed grass and horse manure... I would imgine with cows they have a greater chance to thrive cause the stomach does not kill the spores on the grass they eat. I don't hear much about large sub finds , at least not for a while.


--------------------
these long agonizing months without you...have been long and agonizing..
"War Doesn't Decide Who's Right... It Only Decides Who's Left."


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OfflineLysergic_Milkman
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Re: A guide to hunting edibles and actives in Georgia [Re: flowstone]
    #4031564 - 04/08/05 06:12 PM (11 years, 8 months ago)

Quote:

flowstone said:

- Weilii-
The key feature is the signature weilii smell that separates it from the rest.

-cubensis-

Any tips, advice, or stories about this wonderful species :mushroom2: are welcomed!

-Panaeolus subbalteatus-

I wonder about its uses and how people in GA find them and if it is worth targeting. From what I hear rarely do they bruise blue and even if you find a bunch, you have to eat a bunch to feel effects.
I am curious if anyone sees any physical or spiritual advantages of taking a weaker mushroom verses a strong one. I've heard they even cause more nausea than cubes or weilii.
I really would like to understand this species more, so if you have first hand trip comparison to other species with this mushroom, or other knowledge let us know.





first off...
NEW SHROOM!
Found a shaggy mane (Coprinus comata) while hunting cubes. about the last thing i expected. I thought id seen these a few times on the side of the road but never checked. Now it is confirmed (although it prolly isnt any new info, just new to me).
I took the one specimen home and sauted it because ive never tried shaggy mane before. It smelled unpleasant raw (like poisonous, corrosive chemicals) but i was sure in my ID so i fryed it up. Almost as soon as it hit the pan the smell changed from nasty to absolutely delicious! It smells [and tastes] like buttered chicken with a hint of garlic (but not exactly, just the closest thing i can compare to). One thing that I firmly believe is that the taste and smell of fungi is KEY in IDing, more important than visual ID infact. The sole purpose of taste buds and olfactory senses is to identify what it is that your eating, and i use that to my advantage. Hopefully others will follow.

Ps. WEILII: plese explain the smell, its very imoportant to me (as my philosophy states above).

Ps. CUBENSIS: I have observed this mushroom in Texas, and found that only one general strain of the mushroom grows. But in Georgia, I have found in excess of 10 different strains and variants in one season! Some very exotic looking. they arent similar strains either, no. They are all VERY different in their appearance, habitat, and potentcy. I plan to get some pics of most of them this season but I observed one extremely unusaly strain. It grew only in a forest clearing on cow manure that was scattered and mixed up (like someone had kicked it seeral times).
Its extremely small in stature, no more than 1.3in high and .5-2cm across the cap, and ~3-8mm across the stipe. the cap is strongly convex and cosistently light golden brown in young specimens, and expands to obtusely umbonate with a broad, low umbo, light golden brown in color and translucent white around the edge. The stipe bruises a very deep, indigo blue. a thin ring develops around the stipe and ofcourse, stains purple upon maturing. the gills are very light brown (almost cream) when young, and change to greyish tan with maturity (with a purple hue). it smells and tastes like a P. cubensis (like potent chemicals that will make you wince). Im not sure it actually is a P. cubensis, but i am 100% sure it is a Psilocybe and it is active. Possibly a new species? I sure hope so. Ive never had my name in a book before  :smirk:

Pa. SUBBALTEATUS: These shrooms are not as week as you think, that is a common misconception. they are about as strong as cubes by weight, and are a little smaller, so are technically less potent, but not very much so. It is true however that they present some nausea (mostly getting the runs the next day), but no vommiting (not in my experience). The trip is significantly different from others in that it contains chemicals mostly local to the species that relax the muscles and create a dreamy, euphoric trip. Most people that use Pan subbs prefer them over cubes (and other species). Also, Pan subbs taste faintly like coconut.

Side Notes: Amanita muscaria (the orange yellow version that grows in N GA) tastes exactly like chicken, and smells kinda like potatoes (the stipe of Amanita citrina smells strongly of raw potatoes).
Just thought id add that little piece of info  :smile:


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OfflineGumbyM
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Re: A guide to hunting edibles and actives in Georgia [Re: Lysergic_Milkman]
    #4031610 - 04/08/05 06:20 PM (11 years, 8 months ago)

I have a few words of wisdom..


Chanterelles are at peak season around july to august, but really start fruiting when temps are in the high 80s. They tend to grow on hill sides. They grow near hardwood trees and tend to be near creeks.

The morels tend to grow within 20-50ft of a body of water, near hardwood trees. I'm still trying to figure out what trees they like the best but it seems like poplar trees.

As far as the weilii go, look for Psatherella velutina, it's a good indicator species. If they're up, weilii should be up at the time or up within the next few weeks.

And another species... I don't know why anyone would want to find these things to eat them, but they're fun to look at. Amanita muscaria grows in early fall near pine trees.


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Offlinemastacheefa
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Re: A guide to hunting edibles and actives in Georgia [Re: Gumby]
    #4031920 - 04/08/05 07:43 PM (11 years, 8 months ago)

Ps. WEILII: plese explain the smell, its very imoportant to me (as my philosophy states above).


Weilii smell like no other mushroom Ive found. When I first started looking for weilii, last fall, everyone told me they would smell like an old cucumber or kinda metallic. And that is exactly what they smell like. Kinda like a salad thats gone bad. When I found my first weilii I had no doubt that it was what it was. Now that Ive eaten weilii many times I have a nose for them. Like when Im getting out of my car and walking up to check a patch, if they are there I can smell them from 10 feet away.


Edited by mastacheefa (04/08/05 07:45 PM)


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Re: A guide to hunting edibles and actives in Georgia [Re: flowstone]
    #4035562 - 04/09/05 11:07 PM (11 years, 8 months ago)

I wanted to make a note about Copes in GA:

You probably won't find them anywhere north of say... LaGrange GA (still could be too far North). My guess is that they only grow in extreme southern portions of the state like around the Valdosta area. They might grow out near the coast by Savannah. Don't get your heart set on finding them unless you're in extreme southern GA.


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Offlinehot48yearolds
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Re: A guide to hunting edibles and actives in Georgia [Re: Gumby]
    #4143858 - 05/06/05 09:28 PM (11 years, 7 months ago)

weilii  :syringe:


--------------------
"Truth is more in the process than in the result."
- J. Krishnamurti




"We ourselves are not an illusory part of Reality; rather are we Reality itself illusorily conceived." Wei Wu Wei


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OfflineLysergic_Milkman
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Re: A guide to hunting edibles and actives in Georgia [Re: hot48yearolds]
    #4143948 - 05/06/05 10:00 PM (11 years, 7 months ago)

You have just ressurected a dead (or dying) post. Please check the last date replied next time please.


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Re: A guide to hunting edibles and actives in Georgia [Re: flowstone]
    #4145213 - 05/07/05 08:19 AM (11 years, 7 months ago)

Quote:

flowstone said:
- Weilii-
How can anyone in N GA overlook this mushroom! One of the most potent and diversely unique species, this mushroom never ceases to amaze me. Almost stalking ME, I have been lucky in several finds of this mushroom god. This mushroom ranges from yard to yard and takes many shapes and colors( from almost white light brown to deep metallic silverish blue!!!) The key feature is the signature weilii smell that separates it from the rest. I am looking foreword to a good fall season( and maybe spring) and would like anyone and every-ones advice and input on this species.


-Copelandia cyanescens-
Never have I found one of these illusive mushrooms! although I have found many of the closely similar( to someone who has never seen one) Panaeolus Artillum, never have I found a real copelandia.
I am very interested in the SPECIFICS of this mushroom, as in: what else is happening in nature in GA when this mushroom reaches the prime of it's season. Any help or information about this is welcome. This is the mushroom I hear very little about in GA.


:sun:




Are weillii and Coplanda cyanescens native only to N. Ga? has anyone found either of these species/strains in S.GA? I've never heard anything but Cubensis below macon, but, a dcoter friend of mine told me once that "the little ones" that grow in the northern part of the state don't cause the intestinal discromfort associated with Cubensis.
S.GA Mycofreaks, and Mycocologists let us know. Thanks
PEACE!!!


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OfflineScU
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Re: A guide to hunting edibles and actives in Georgia [Re: psick_psimon]
    #4147492 - 05/07/05 05:55 PM (11 years, 7 months ago)

something like this?




Edited by ScU (05/07/05 05:57 PM)


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Invisiblemjshroomer
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Re: A guide to hunting edibles and actives in Georgia [Re: psick_psimon]
    #4147823 - 05/07/05 07:45 PM (11 years, 7 months ago)

Copelandia is not a native genus or any of its 13 or so subspecies. IT is an introduced species to the Americas and southern Europe and Africa. IT is from Asia and is common in most tropical and subtropical climates. So far P. weilii is known only from Georgia.

mj


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OfflineLysergic_Milkman
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Re: A guide to hunting edibles and actives in Georgia [Re: mjshroomer]
    #4149772 - 05/08/05 12:15 PM (11 years, 7 months ago)

P. atlantis is also native to georgia in case you were interested...


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Invisiblemjshroomer
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Re: A guide to hunting edibles and actives in Georgia [Re: Lysergic_Milkman]
    #4149861 - 05/08/05 12:37 PM (11 years, 7 months ago)

Thanks, am already aware of the species.

I only mentioned the shrooms you mentioned.

mj


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OfflineDimmy
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Re: A guide to hunting edibles and actives in Georgia [Re: mjshroomer]
    #4150298 - 05/08/05 03:02 PM (11 years, 7 months ago)

the weather is looking pretty promising for Georgia. temps in the mid 70s - 80s and scattered showers for about 7 of the next ten days. my buddy has been spotting valetuna around so maybe the old weilii boys will start popping up soon.


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Re: A guide to hunting edibles and actives in Georgia [Re: Dimmy]
    #4151129 - 05/08/05 09:53 PM (11 years, 7 months ago)

Dude B****, I and B**** just talked about heading that way SOON. Give us ring, man. PEACE!!


--------------------
"a new and beautiful light cast upon the world, the blissful intensity of life combined with the dematerialization of the surrounding reality and complete loss of ego triggered new and aware consciencenious; steadily evolving...."
Per Aspera Ad Astra


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