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OfflineAlan RockefellerM
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Mushroom Photography Tips * 4
    #9002264 - 09/29/08 01:35 PM (10 years, 7 months ago)

Mushroom Photography Tips - By Koraks

http://www.koraks.nl/index.php?menuparent=&page=9

Using your digital camera's macro mode - All you need to know to get close to your mushrooms and produce extremely sharp super magnified results

http://www.ephotozine.com/article/Using-your-digital-cameras-macro-mode

The Art of Myco-Macro

http://simplymanna.com/art-myco-macro


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OfflineSubbedhunter420
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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller] * 1
    #9002489 - 09/29/08 02:36 PM (10 years, 7 months ago)

VERY USEFUL! If you dont know how to use your macro/dont know if you have one on your camera, you should read this!


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OfflineFatBear
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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Subbedhunter420] * 3
    #9028876 - 10/04/08 04:27 PM (10 years, 7 months ago)

Some boring, some whimsical, some experimental:

http://flickr.com/photos/fatbear/sets/72157603965289143/

--FatBear


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Invisiblekoraks
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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: FatBear] * 1
    #9028915 - 10/04/08 04:37 PM (10 years, 7 months ago)

But all of them nicely done :thumbup: I'm currently considering buying a compact for mushroom photography as well, as it's much easier to work close to the ground with a small camera. And image quality is pretty good with some of them, these days, especially at low ISO settings. A vital requirement would be a hot shoe connector in order to be able to use a flash unit that can be positioned separately from the camera.


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OfflineFatBear
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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: koraks] * 1
    #9028976 - 10/04/08 04:56 PM (10 years, 7 months ago)

Thanks, koraks,

  I should say that mine tend to focus on the "character" of the mushroom rather than on ID'ing them.

  Most of those were done with a creaking old Olympus C2020z.  I really like what I could do with that camera, but the image sizes were so small that they are really only good for online. 

  I used a Mamiya RZ-67 in the 1990s.  That camera produced huge images.  But it got too heavy for my bad feet to lug around with all its associated paraphenalia.  I needed something in the middle so last year I bought an Olympus E510.  I have only taken a few mushroom photos with it, but the season is upon us, so I should be getting a lot more of them soon.  Olympus makes a flash for the E510 (and others) that operates wirelessly, and I've ordered one of those, too, as I am getting tired of the deer-in-the-headlights look of on-camera flash.  The wireless feature should be helpful in brushy situations.  I guess the new flash will require more learning.  One nice thing about a simple camera like the C2020z is that there really aren't a lot of variables.  No matter what equipment you use you will have to adapt to the constraints.  That's half of the creativity of it.  The fewer variables, the easier it is to adapt.

  A hint, for mushroom photographers: light is everything.  Use your flash and learn to modify it.  You can fold a piece of paper so it is self-propping and put it near a mushroom in order to reflect some of the flash into unlit areas.  Or you can deliberately shade certain areas from the flash.  On compact cameras you can use the flash to draw the mushroom from the background by setting an under-exposure and using flash at the same time.  On more controllable cameras you will have to figure out how to mix flash and background exposures so the mushroom is brighter than the background.  In PhotoShop a little bit of unobtrusive vignetting can also be helpful in cases where you didn't put enough emphasis on the mushroom.

  Another hint: wear your kneepads and expect to get dirty because the best photos are usually taken with your face in the dirt.  Be a mushroom, be their peer and they will show themselves to you in a way that they rarely do to mere humans.  :-)

--FatBear


Edited by FatBear (10/04/08 06:41 PM)


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Invisiblekoraks
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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: FatBear] * 1
    #9029007 - 10/04/08 05:02 PM (10 years, 7 months ago)

All very sound pieces of advice :thumbup:

MF does have its charm, although portability is an issue. I still have a 645 lying around, gathering dust due to a focus calibration problem. Besides, I never really liked the 4:3 format. I like either 1:1 or 2:3 (or even wider). Currently, I use an EOS 20d for mushroom photography, but with grip and L-lenses attached it is quite a hassle to get really close to the ground. I do carry a Velbon tripod from which I can suspend the camera upside-down, which allows me to get really low, but I keep getting muck on my head from peering down the viewfinder. So I'd really like to get myself a nice little compact that I can poise on a GorillaPod. I think I'm going to look into Canon's PowerShot and IXUS product lines to see if there's something to my liking there.


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OfflineFatBear
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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: koraks] * 1
    #9029762 - 10/04/08 09:21 PM (10 years, 7 months ago)

I have a Bogen (now Manfrotto) tripod with the legs that swing out really wide and that weird 3D head.  Using this with the center post upside down and the head twisted around as only this one can do, I can actually set the camera at ground level and it is still upright for easier control.  But tripods are such a hassle for low-level photography that I really encourage people to learn to use the flash so you don't need them.

Olympus made the first dSLRs with "live view", allowing you to frame and focus your image on the LCD then shoot.  In fact, this was one of the key reasons for my selecting this camera.  It's kind of clumsy, doing a lot of clicking and buzzing and taking a long time to process a shot, but it works and is very handy for really awkward angles and/or muddy places.  I'm not an equipment junky, so I don't know what's out there in 2008, but I assume the other camera manufacturers are also offering some form of live view by now.  So whatever modern lens system a person has I imagine they can find a camera with live view to work with it.


Edited by FatBear (10/04/08 09:22 PM)


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: koraks] * 1
    #9029787 - 10/04/08 09:31 PM (10 years, 7 months ago)

Have you seen this?? I'm considering making it as my next camera, though I will really miss the movable LCD of other cameras in the Powershot series.


Edited by georgeM (10/04/08 09:32 PM)


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Invisiblekoraks
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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: georgeM] * 1
    #9031183 - 10/05/08 06:09 AM (10 years, 7 months ago)

@FatBear: I tried shooting with flash only, but I don't really like the results in most cases. Usually, I want to stop down to somewhere in the f/8-f/32 range and balance flash light with available light to retain the 'natural' look somewhat. With the low light levels usually associated with mushroom photography, that comes down to exposure times of up to 10 seconds, so a tripod is an absolute must for my style of mushroom photography (which is not to say that it is a categorical rule; if flash only works for you, beautiful, enjoy the flexibility!)

The live view function of the Olympus has now been mimicked by at least Canon and Nikon, perhaps also by Sony; I'm not really sure about them, but I suppose they followed suit. I've come to realize over the last three years that it is a useful function, especially in this line of work. Unfortunately, as far as I know none of the dSLRs support live view and have an adjustable display, indeed (GeorgeM, I hear ya!) like e.g. the older (?) Canon PowerShot series. Nevertheless, that G10 does look interesting. My gf today voiced her preference for an Olympus Mju 1060, but although it looks like a nifty little camera, it lacks a decent wide angle (zoom range starting at 37mm in 35mm-equiv.) It is an affordable camera though, but it definitely wouldn't work for me. The G10 is rather appealing, though. Thanks for the tip, GeorgeM!


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OfflineTheylikethatshit
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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: koraks] * 1
    #9037898 - 10/06/08 05:34 PM (10 years, 7 months ago)

My macro does not always work, sometimes if the mushroom is too small it has a hard time focusing therefore I cant take a clear shot.
any help on this?


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OfflineAlan RockefellerM
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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Theylikethatshit] * 2
    #9039979 - 10/07/08 01:26 AM (10 years, 7 months ago)

If you set the mushroom on something with a texture like some moss, you can get it to focus on that.


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Invisiblekoraks
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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Theylikethatshit] * 2
    #9042176 - 10/07/08 02:38 PM (10 years, 7 months ago)

Try maximizing the contrast between the mushroom and the background, for example by shining a flashlight on the mushroom. Remember that your AF system will attempt to detect edges, so the sharper you can get the edges of the mushroom to show, the better your AF will function. This is also explicitly explained in my tutorial: http://www.koraks.nl/index.php?menuparent=&page=9#focus

If the shroom is really small compared to the image frame (e.g. it makes up < 10% of the image area), try moving closer or zooming in further. In that case, you're probably taking a pretty crappy picture anyway with lots of shit in it and very little mushroom.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: koraks] * 2
    #9042263 - 10/07/08 02:54 PM (10 years, 7 months ago)

get the powershot s5is it rocks great super macro a small selection of lenses.

:smile:


--------------------


    CrAnKy PiLlOwS YeAh PiLlOwS


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Invisiblekoraks
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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: smily] * 1
    #9042270 - 10/07/08 02:56 PM (10 years, 7 months ago)

Nice camera, but too big for a compact, but lacking the image quality and versatility of a dSLR. Don't get me wrong, it's a very nice device, but it's not for me :wink:


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: koraks] * 2
    #9051028 - 10/09/08 12:11 AM (10 years, 7 months ago)

working the focus is an artform. Finding that right angle at the right length of focus,. to grasp what you're trying to take a photo of. especially fungus, mushrooms almost always have they're own character or personality. Always fun things to shoot. :boobs:


--------------------



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Offlinegunga
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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller] * 1
    #9214503 - 11/09/08 11:02 PM (10 years, 6 months ago)

I Do my best..

h t t p://picasaweb.google.com/outsidelinden/91408_shrroming#

help i identify


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Offlinegunga
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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: gunga] * 1
    #9214507 - 11/09/08 11:02 PM (10 years, 6 months ago)



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Invisiblekoraks
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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: gunga] * 1
    #9217112 - 11/10/08 11:41 AM (10 years, 6 months ago)

You got some nice shots there. Please create a new topic if you want anything ID-ed. Also read the other stickies on top of this board.


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OfflineRazoom
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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Theylikethatshit] * 1
    #9327873 - 11/28/08 05:21 PM (10 years, 5 months ago)

It is very beautiful. Theylikethatshit.  Really beautifully. :smirk: Music by radio has now played, and at once were recollected night and mountains on Altai.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Theylikethatshit] * 1
    #9329496 - 11/28/08 11:59 PM (10 years, 5 months ago)

Quote:

Theylikethatshit said:
My macro does not always work, sometimes if the mushroom is too small it has a hard time focusing therefore I cant take a clear shot.
any help on this?




it all depends on the glass and the camera you are working with. Every camera and every lens has its own unique focal point. You have to play around with whatever you are using get a feel for it then go from there. If you have manual focus, bring it as close as you can, then move the camera back and forth until the subject gets into focus, then youll know you minimum focal distance. :boobs:


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I am incapable of conceiving infinity, and yet I do not accept finity.
- Simone de Beauvoir -


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OfflineAlan RockefellerM
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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #9461737 - 12/19/08 01:51 PM (10 years, 4 months ago)

By Dimitar Bojantchev - http://mushroomhobby.com Top 10 Mistakes in Mushroom Photography

Unstaged specimen
The Top 10 Errors

in

(Beginner) Fungal Photography

(+Discussion/Suggestions)

Staged specimens
Digital photography and the ability to preview instantly the results have made the practice of making pictures much easier. Despite that we still see an alarmingly large collection of poor photos floating around, mainly in id sessions and similar settings. Here is  list of some of the most common errors. Again, the main cure is -- REVIEW EACH AND EVERY SHOT -- then repeat/fix if needed.

1) BLURRED IMAGES.  This is the most common problem that renders many photos useless. It goes beyond aesthetics, as many times the images are incongruent. Everyone has fallen victim to it at one time or another. There are some main reasons why BLUR occurs:

a) FOCUS PROBLEMS
. The main subject is not in focus -- easy to operate digital cameras make it a bit harder to tell the lens where to focus, particularly when shooting very small objects.  Many times the background is in focus, but not the main subject.

b) CAMERA SHAKE  When shooting at slow speeds, or the hand of the photographer is too unsteady, the image will be blurred.  This is more likely to occur with inexperienced shooters owning Digital SLRs and not paying attention to the combination speed/aperture. Using a tripod is best, but sometimes we do not have it and are required to shoot from hand. In such cases it may be Ok to open up the aperture to F5.6-F8 and gain speed while sacrificing depth of field.
c) SHALLOW DEPTH OF FIELD  -- see below, Problem 4.

This Ramaria araiospora got it shaken (not stirred).

These Mycenas got shaken out of their identity

Background in focus, but not the main subject, the matsie... Did not review the shot until I went home. Then banged the camera in my head, but it was too late.

Left: trying to hand hold at F16 produced a very blurred image of this pretty Lepiota flammeatincta. Right: at F5.6 there was a loss of depth of field, but gain in sharpness. Sometimes we have to compromise. Of course, having a tripod solves that problem. More on Depth of Field.

2) BAD COMPOSITION Bad compositions fall into several groups. By far the most common are:
a) FAILURE TO CAPTURE ALL DIAGNOSTIC FEATURES -- good analytical composition for species identification requires that all pertinent aspects of the specimen are photographed.

With so little shown nobody can reliably say what these Inocybe are.

Suillus sp. Nice to see so many fruitbodies, but not just one side...

Minimum Required Features for Reliable Macro Diagnostics:(1) Cap; (2) Gills; (3) Gill Attachment; (4) Stem; (5) Context; (6) Discolorations surface/context. Notes on Habitat, Odor and Taste are criticallygyimportant too.
b) MAIN SUBJECT TOO SMALL. There are far too many photos out there where the main subject takes about 1/100-th of the area of the picture frame. c) SUBJECT OUT OF FRAME...
Don't you hate when that happens?
d) MIXED COLLECTIONS

What are these? Which are (not) edible? Haven't you heard that question before? Where do you start on that photo.

Sometimes avoiding mixed collections requires one to pay close attention: Mycena vulgaris & Mycena cinerella

3) POOR CHOICE OF COLLECTIONS Using old/damaged specimens or collections consisting of a single fruitbody for id purposes is not a good idea. Except in rare circumstances of absolute necessity, one should ignore such collections, Go find another one, or wait for a better opportunity. While true for most Genera, this rule is especially pertinent  to Cortinarius where older fruitbodies simply cannot convey enough information that can be used for obtaining a good id.

Nobody can tell what kind of Cortinarius these are

Member of Russulales

The same Cortinarius comptulus patch -- note how the old fruitbodies (right) lose all identity by browning out completely.

4) (TOO SHALLOW) DEPTH OF FIELD This one is trickier and presents questions even to more experienced photographers. A lot of blurring takes place when shooting mushrooms because the subjects are displaced quite much from the focus point. This is the primary driving force for Mushroom Photographers to use higher F-stops. But that requires longer exposure times. And that often requires that the camera is mounted instead of hand-held. Small, or long stemmed mushrooms present that challenge to a greater extent as there may be significant distance between all parts of the group that one is trying to capture.

What exactly is in focus here? Countless photos presented to the forums for identification suffer from that debilitating problem. Very small portion is in focus and usually not the important part.

Long stemmed mushrooms present the Depth of Field (DOF) challenge to a greater extent as there may be significant distance between all parts of the group that one is trying to capture. Gaining equal sharpness on both cap and base is not easy. There are other "non-photographic" means to solve that problem.

One strategy to get better Depth of Field is to move further away from the subject, zoom in, increase the F-stops to more than F16, preferably F20-F32 and use longer exposure times. A tripod is a must in that case. Mycena californiensis & Psathyrella aff. gracilis


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OfflineAlan RockefellerM
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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #9461757 - 12/19/08 01:54 PM (10 years, 4 months ago)

LIGHT RELATED ERRORS      PHOTO + GRAPHY ==  LIGHT + SCRIBE

5) PHOTOGRAPHING MUSHROOMS IN DIRECT SUNLIGHT OR SHARP SHADOWS. This one is a classic and in the group of highly annoying errors. Everybody has tried to shoot things that are in direct sunlight. The results are awful. The amazing thing is that some people keep doing it over and over again, as if enjoying the poor results. Simple solution is to block the direct sunlight by some means -- photographers in the field can use their body or camera bag for such purposes. Be mindful of using clothing to block the sunlight, as it may  let some light go through and usually reflects the color of the garment. A yellow shirt, for example, when used as a sun blocker will give yellow cast to the entire photograph.

6) OVER/UNDER EXPOSURE The most common error is to see shots of big white mushrooms where most of the white surfaces are overexposed. The opposite is true too. Entirely black surfaces tends to naturally get underexposed and the camera settings need to be altered. Even the easy to use digital cameras allow the user to do "exposure compensation" when she feels it is appropriate.

The most common victims of that treatment are the white Amanitas. The background is exposed Ok, but the white surfaces of these Amanita ocreata are overexposed and washed out.

Exposing for the white parts only, usually a stop or two down, solves the problem and shows the full texture of the white surfaces. Naturally, the background is slightly underexposed, but that's irrelevant for these Amanita silvicola and Stropharia ambigua

7) OVER RELIANCE ON FLASH  Flash use is one of the most frequently argued and yet quite confused subjects. A little flash definitely pulls out some subtle colors that may be missed otherwise. But only when used in moderation. Substituting flash power for longer exposure times, especially in darker environments, produces terrible results that fall into two main groups (see below, left and right).
Harsh shadows. Distorted colors: I am more guilty than most for failing in that trap of flash overuse for a long period of time. 
Excessive flash No/Less flash



 
Limited range: The flash does not have the power to reach far and creates the feeling of "Kingdom of Darkness" even on a nice  bright day. People fail to understand that larger patches cannot be captured properly using the flash. You've seen people shooting with flash in a stadium, or in the City in the evening... Not a good idea.

Stropharia ambigua
in the Kingdom of Darkness

Clitocybe inversa

Xeromphalina fulvipes -- the strong flash (Left) tends to give reddish cast overall.

8) POOR USAGE OF THE NATURAL LIGHT  Natural light is a great asset. When properly used, that is. Sometimes, particularly early and late in the day the light come slanted towards the subject and tends to bounce off the horizontal surfaces. In other cases the underside of the mushroom may not gain advantage of light that is coming from behind. Here are a few examples of poor choice of natural light.

The top of this Boletus pulcherrimus is overexposed, while the  bottom is underexposed. Not the best time to try to take this kind of shot on a late Fall afternoon.

Early in the morning the light comes under too shallow an angle and reflects off the horizontal surfaces.

Even if the light is muted, the slanted angle of the light early in the morning requires special care on how the specimens are oriented for picture. Things put side by side can shadow each other excessively.

9) SHOOTING UNDER INCANDESCENT LIGHT Most photos made indoors, under "yellow light" are unattractive and of limited use. Sometimes that's unavoidable like in foray/mushroom fair id tables. But if given  a choice one should always strive to choose daylight.

PREFERENCES/SUGGESTIONS/THINGS TO CONSIDER

When reviewing this page with members of the MushroomTalk forum it appeared that the remaining subjects are more a matter of suggestions and preferences than hard necessities. Since the purpose of this page is not to pontificate matters to the extent of meddling with "personal taste", I leave these Sections as something just to "think about".
10) (POOR) CHOICE OF BACKGROUND. Finding a good background for a mushroom photo requires some thought. Cleaning up the scene might be important in many cases in order to have the main subject to contrast nicely. Reviewing the photo helps too. Sometimes what seems like a bad choice, is Ok, and vice-versa

The Red Fir seems to be the natural host for this Cortinarius calochrous, but the fir cone debris are not the best photo background.

It's not just the mixed collection here, but the choice of unnatural background is totally uninspiring
Sometimes collections need to be photographed after being moved from their original location. In general I think that this is a terrible practice, but sometimes there are good reasons for doing so.  Yet, it is still a good idea to preserve a degree of Nature in the photograph.

Following the example of Cortinarius Flora Photographica (CFP) these C. cinnamomeus were photographed against a somewhat neutral, yet natural background.

Here the tiny Hemimycena is moved atop a fallen leaf for some macro lens photography. Natural background always seems better than the artificial.
11) HUMAN MATTERS -- BODY PARTS AND ARTIFACTS. The main motivation for including such in the photo is the desire to show scale.  Yet, I agree with Nathan Wilson (MushroomObserver.org) and Ron Pastorino (SOMA)  that the practice may create less than appealing photographs. In most cases, I believe that scale can be conveyed by well known natural objects, such as cones, leaves, etc. Here are a few examples, make your own choice.

Unnatural objects

1 inch square      Photo: J. Ammirati.
vs.
In this case the moss pretty conveys the scale quite well and the coin rather diverts attention from the Marasmius androsaceus...

Natural object to convey scale -- cones of Douglas Fir (l) and Pinus strobus (r). Clitocybe sp. and Amanita jacksonii

Sometimes we need well known objects to convey scale --  tiny Pholiotina
12) 'IN SITU' vs. CONTROLLED ENVIRONMENT Darvin DeShazer (SOMA, Sci. Adv.) expressed the view that he likes the type of mushroom photography (Roger Phillips and others) where the collections are treated under controlled lighting and uniform background (affecting white balance). This kind of setup is typically indoor, or definitely away from the field. My view couldn't be more to the contrary of that, as I feel that 'In Situ' photography is far preferable. One concern that I have is that many mushrooms undergo color transformation once they are collected. The effects on the hygrophanous, as well as tiny and perishable species has to be dealt with too. Some mushrooms pale out as can be seen in books with that kind of photography. But this is also a matter of preservation technique apparently, as there are examples of excellent indoor photos. Yet, in general, I find such "controlled photos" lacking life, sterile and uninspiring, more like Lab specimens ("frogs in a jar"). I believe that the Natural habitat of the mushroom not only conveys a lot of analytical information, such as the habitat and location specifics, but also has a better artistic components. By setting certain mood, it allows us to enjoy the surrounding environment, which is a major reason for why we go out at the first place. It also helps us set mental notes on where we can find such mushrooms.
Controlled Environment -- not a particularly good photo, but it conveys the general idea. Chlorophyllum brunneum
Mushrooms in the Natural Habitat (In Situ) -- Boletus regius (California) and Boletus frostii
Conveying a sense of the Season and Environment

Fall Coccora (Amanita lanei)

Spring Coccora (Amanita lanei)


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: snoot]
    #9461807 - 12/19/08 02:03 PM (10 years, 4 months ago)

Wow, Im gonna try it.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #9463573 - 12/19/08 08:04 PM (10 years, 4 months ago)

Awesome tutorials Alan, thanks for sharing!


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OfflineUnderTheOak
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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: georgeM]
    #9463868 - 12/19/08 08:59 PM (10 years, 4 months ago)

The top 10 errors... and it counts to 12 :laugh:
A very interesting and helpful thread! :thumbup:


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: UnderTheOak]
    #9465062 - 12/20/08 01:50 AM (10 years, 4 months ago)

a very hearty post alan


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: snoot]
    #9473096 - 12/21/08 04:23 PM (10 years, 4 months ago)

Help, I don't know much about any of the things I have read here today.
I am going out now to try a few things I have learned.

Will someone look at my photos and give me some tips?

http://s546.photobucket.com/albums/hh440/flutterbilady/


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Rikku]
    #9476567 - 12/22/08 05:54 AM (10 years, 4 months ago)

Excellent images riku, well above the standard we usually get here. There's two things that you might want to consider to lift the quality of your pics another notch:
- Pay close attention to focus; especially if you use a small depth of field (a small f/number = large aperture) getting the focus right is crucial.
- Composition. This is the hardest thing for every photographer. Think of what aspect of the mushroom(s) you want to emphasize and figure out how to most effectively frame it. Choose an appropriate viewpoint and decide which parts of the mushroom you want to include or exclude. In clusters of mushrooms, think of which specimens you want in the frame and which ones you don't. If you want to picture the entire cluster, it's usually a good idea to include all of it (don't cut of edges of caps). But keep in mind that there are no conclusive rules for composition, you are the artist!

A final note: I like how you balance available light and flash light. You could consider underexposing the environment a bit (e.g. correct normal exposure at -1 stop; flash exposure not corrected) to put more emphasis on the subject. But again, you are the artist and it's up to you to decide how to get optimal results.

Remember: better a fuzzy photo of a clear concept than a clear picture of a fuzzy concept.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: koraks]
    #9479132 - 12/22/08 06:28 PM (10 years, 4 months ago)

:grin: First I would like to say thank you.
I'm an amateur.
I wish I lived closer to someone that could show me the steps you are referring to,
  (e.g. correct normal exposure at -1 stop; flash exposure not corrected)
I only point and click.
I have a Sony Cyber-shot, thanks to threads I learned about macro.:D
I haven't had the chance to use it yet.
If that small mushroom is still on the tree I will retake it using the setting.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Rikku]
    #9481951 - 12/23/08 08:04 AM (10 years, 4 months ago)

You're welcome. The Internet is loaded with photography tutorials, many of them also covering the subject of exposure in varying degrees of sophistication. This one seems like a good place to start to learn the basics.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: koraks]
    #9483766 - 12/23/08 05:09 PM (10 years, 4 months ago)

Quote:

This one seems like a good place to start to learn the basics.




Wow that is a good article.  Most of the cool and interesting stuff I learned was in this paragraph:


The stops are arranged so that a change of 1 stop lets in half or twice the light of the next setting. A shutter speed of 1/60 second lets in half the light that 1/30 second does, and twice the light of 1/125 second. An aperture of f/8 lets in half the light that f/5.6 does, and twice the light of f/11. If you make the shutter speed 1 stop slower (letting in 1 stop more light), and an aperture 1 full stop smaller (letting in 1 stop less light), the exposure doesn't change. (In all modes other than manual this happens automatically). However, you increase the depth of field slightly and also the possibility of blur from camera or subject movement.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #9487434 - 12/24/08 06:03 AM (10 years, 4 months ago)

The fact that an increase of one f-stop (say, from f/8 to f/5.6) means an in/decrease of twice the amount of light becomes even more logical if you realize that it is in fact a SQRT(2) factor: 5.6 * SQRT(2) = 8. This makes sense since the aperture is a 2-dimensional hole and therefore subject to surface maths.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: koraks]
    #9736587 - 02/04/09 09:40 PM (10 years, 3 months ago)



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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #9938990 - 03/09/09 01:06 PM (10 years, 2 months ago)

I had a bunch of problems getting the flash toned down on my camera... it just won't go low enough to take a good pic on automatic settings. I haven't learned about f stops and what have you, but I plan to learn with the info in this thread.

So, recently I saw a tip online where you take a piece of white paper ( I used a receipt) and cover the flash with it. You can experiment with different thicknesses of paper to get the right filtering effect. You can tape it in place if you want to, but for most people, just holding it in front of the flash while taking the pic works just fine.

It allowed me to finally take good shots, whereas before they were just horribly washed out, and if I turned off the flash, they were horribly dark...  I can't show examples because they aren't mushrooms... and they're candid.

The only other thing that worked passably was backing off the subject, then using zoom, but that is more difficult to get a good shot, and you can't do macro shots like that. Plus, if you zoom in,  you have to hold the camera still or you get a lot of blurring.

Just thought I'd share. I used to get much better macro shots with my Olympus than with my current Canon, but the Canon is a better camera overall. If I learn about f stops and aperture settings, I might get much better macro shots out of this camera too.

Thanks for the info, and hope my tip helps someone else.


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Edited by PinheadX (03/09/09 01:09 PM)


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: PinheadX]
    #9981829 - 03/16/09 03:34 PM (10 years, 2 months ago)

That's a useful piece of advice, pinhead. I've mucked around with paper on the odd occasion as well. It definitely can save the day.

If you want to do it the 'proper' way, look for a setting labeled 'flash exposure compensation' on your camera. Turn it back to -1 or perhaps even -2 stops.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: snoot]
    #9985490 - 03/16/09 11:48 PM (10 years, 2 months ago)

Excellent post, lots of useful information I could not have found elsewhere!


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: bryce76]
    #10102666 - 04/03/09 11:16 PM (10 years, 1 month ago)

A really good camera that you can get for cheap is the Canon A570is

http://shop.ebay.com/?_nkw=canon+a570

It has image stabilization which really helps taking pictures of mushrooms in a dark forest as the sun is going down and all of the other modern canon features.  7 megapixels is a lot, perfect for mushroom work.  Macro is real good. 

I got mine on ebay used for $49, its a great camera for outdoors and works well with my microscope.  They go for about $75 new, here is an auction that ends in 20 hours and probably will probably sell for a good price.

edit: That one sold for $11


Edited by Alan Rockefeller (04/07/09 07:52 PM)


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #10156738 - 04/13/09 10:46 AM (10 years, 1 month ago)

works well w/ your microscope? How do you do that?


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: lqdtrance]
    #10157372 - 04/13/09 01:34 PM (10 years, 1 month ago)

I hold the camera up to the microscope, adjust the fine focus on the scope and press the shutter.

It helps to have the camera set to tungsten white balance.

Also you can zoom in on the camera, sometimes that helps.

One way to get the focus perfect is to use the digital zoom to zoom all the way in and then zoom back out to where the manual zoom takes over (3x usually) and take the pic there.

Also you can turn on manual focus on the camera, doesn't really matter where it it is focused.  That gives you a little zoomed in focus window in the middle of the screen that you can use to adjust the fine focus more accurately.

When choosing a camera for a scope, its important to get a camera that has a small lens.  The big expensive cameras that have large lenses gather more light but they are too big compared to the eyepiece lens, making the image really tiny.  A cheap camera (4 - 7 megapixels) with a small lens works best.



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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #10171311 - 04/15/09 02:42 PM (10 years, 1 month ago)

Awesome. I'll have to try that. Thanks!!


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: lqdtrance]
    #10258219 - 04/29/09 10:06 PM (10 years, 22 days ago)

Nice work Alan..

I'm sure most of you already know this but you can get a coupler for your camera for ~$250.  Richard, the guy who makes these is also a Linux guru and TeX dude - so that should put a smile on Alan's face. 

http://tinyurl.com/cgj57c
(please obfuscate links to the outside world - we don't need bad attention)

If you are wondering about cameras, I just bought a Canon G10.  It will work with Richard's coupler, but more important it is also a phenomenal camera that can shoot Raw.

Best,
a


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: anevsky]
    #10259476 - 04/30/09 12:59 AM (10 years, 21 days ago)

Quote:


I'm sure most of you already know this but you can get a coupler for your camera for ~$250.





There are various couplers available but all they do is hold your camera up to the lens, I can usually do that pretty well without any additional hardware.  It would be nice to have something a bit more stable for long exposures since there isn't much light available at 1000x, but I would be more inclined to make something from an old washing machine instead of spend money on a little holder.

I wonder if could hook up a slave flash to blast the sample with light, that would be hilarious.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #10380751 - 05/22/09 10:07 AM (9 years, 11 months ago)

Thanks for posting these tips!

http://mushroomhobby.com/TOP_10_MISTAKES/index.htm is the direct URL for the helpful top 10 mistakes article. The formatting of the post here was a little messed up and difficult for me to read.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #10436460 - 06/01/09 06:49 PM (9 years, 11 months ago)

Hi AR, I didnt look at your tips prior to taking these but next trip I will. In the mean time some shots that maybe of interest. For me they are enjoyable.

Cheers





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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: snoot]
    #10573376 - 06/25/09 10:30 PM (9 years, 10 months ago)

Hey guys, thought I'd share a little tip I use with the macro mode of cameras. Sometimes it's better to back away from the object your shooting and zoom in while using your auto focus (holding the button halfway until your crosshairs turn red). I get some pretty detailed shots this way, sometimes better than close range macro shots, try it.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: cyanide9]
    #10641280 - 07/08/09 01:11 PM (9 years, 10 months ago)

One problem I seem to be running into lately is lighting.  Typically I don't use a flash and rely on long exposure times since I'm using a tripod.  I'm finding that in a lot of cases in order to get the mushroom to be exposed properly (espeically if the mushroom is ligher in color) the surrounding landscape turns out way to dark or underexposed.

I've read some tips on bringing reflectors and such to use natural lighting, but when I go out on walks I typically have nothing but my daugher on my shoulders, a brown paper bag, a swiss army knife in my pocket and my camera on a small tripod. 

Any suggestions on this issue?


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: ShockValue]
    #10641446 - 07/08/09 01:48 PM (9 years, 10 months ago)

The best and most time consuming solution is to shoot HDR photos - Take one underexposed, one just right and one overexposed, and digitally combine them. 

http://www.flickr.com/groups/hdr/pool/

A more time effective way is to move the mushroom and camera until the differences are not so objectionable.

Also try the flash.

I often have the opposite problem - With a light mushroom on a dark background, the camera wants to way overexpose the mushroom.  To fix this I either use the exposure compensation button [EV +/-], or press the shutter down half way, then block most of the light getting to the mushroom with my hand and press it the rest of the way.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #10641728 - 07/08/09 02:41 PM (9 years, 10 months ago)

I tried messing around with HDR once or twice but came up with some very unnatural looking shots.  I don't mind if they look a little proccessed or adjusted, but mine were just strange.  Probably with more practice I could get it looking good.  I have a good HDR book on hold from the library, but the jerk ahead of me has had it for like 3 weeks past due >:)


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: ShockValue]
    #10642274 - 07/08/09 04:49 PM (9 years, 10 months ago)

Quote:

Typically I don't use a flash and rely on long exposure times since I'm using a tripod.  I'm finding that in a lot of cases in order to get the mushroom to be exposed properly (espeically if the mushroom is ligher in color) the surrounding landscape turns out way to dark or underexposed.




Try to block as much light coming to the mushroom as possible, so the background is lighter by comparison.  Especially white mushrooms need to be in the shadows when you photograph them.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #10645638 - 07/09/09 04:29 AM (9 years, 10 months ago)

Alan's tip of selectively blocking light seems very usable. Other than that, I would still suggest bringing a reflector in the field. Mind you, this needn't be a large or cumbersome contraption. A sheet of paper or a white cloth (garment?) will work quite nicely. There's also a vast selection of dedicated reflector sets that can generally be folded to about pocket size (see e.g. here).

Also, as Alan pointed out, use fill flash where appropriate. If your camera features flash exposure compensation, turn it down to -1 or so for natural looking results. HDR is a potential solution too, but I find it too time-consuming and cumbersome myself, so I always try to light the scene as I shoot the picture, limiting the time I need to spend on post processing. In some cases, however, it's possible (or necessary) to reduce the contrast of a scene in post processing. If you intend to do so, make sure your camera has a RAW recording function. Open the RAW files in a suitable utility (e.g. Adobe Camera Raw) and fool around with the sliders to get a balanced image. JPEGs allow some fiddling as well, but generally offer a more limited dynamic range, so you'll be sooner confronted with blown-out highlights.

Capturing and translating the contrast of a real scene to a good image is the number 1 challenge for photographers and it has been since the very beginning. If you're really interested in this, definitely read up on the zone system.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: koraks]
    #10646282 - 07/09/09 10:42 AM (9 years, 10 months ago)

Thanks for the tips guys. Next time I'm out in the field and have a few minutes to expiriment I'll give it a shot.

HDR is an interesting subject to me, and my camera is capable of both RAW and auto-braketing shots, so I'm going to give this another shot to see if I can't get a reasonably natural looking photo.  Fortunatly I'm a network and systems administrator, so spending a bit of time in front of the computer doesn't deter me :smile:


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: ShockValue]
    #10774861 - 07/31/09 03:43 PM (9 years, 9 months ago)

Ok, in another thread I just wrote something about zoom and aperture on digital compact camera's. I'll include this information here as well:

Macro mode
The macro mode of a compact camera essentially allows the lens to focus at a very close distance, much closer than the normal focusing range. This is done by increasing the distance between the lens and the sensor. So essentially, the macro mode allows the lens to be moved further out of the camera than normal. This method, similar to using extension tubes on a SLR camera, has an important implication:
- For the same magnification, less extension is needed with a short focal length ('zoomed out') than with a long focal length ('zoomed in'). However, the amount of extension available on a compact camera is fixed; i.e., it is the same when zoomed in or zoomed out. The implication is that you can get a larger magnification (more macro) when completely zoomed out.
Note that even working in macro when zoomed out, you retain the wide-angle perspective of a short focal length. I find this particularly pleasing for macro shots. Another advantage of shorter focal lengths is that motion blur is less likely to occur, so you can use longer shutter times handheld.

Zoom and focal length
Zoom is changing the focal length of the lens. A higher number (e.g. 135mm) means you draw the object closer, so to speak (zoom in), while a lower number (zoom out) gives a wider perspective.
Aperture is the opening inside the lens assembly through which the light passes towards the sensor. Now pay attention to this, 'cause it's confusing: a smaller number (e.g. f/2.8) represents a larger lens opening, while a larger number is a smaller opening. A larger opening obviously implies that more light reaches the sensor, hence, you can lower the shutter speed or lower the ISO setting as a result. However, a larger opening (low f/number) also means decreased depth of field, so it makes for blurry backgrounds and only the focal object sharply in focus. Increasing the f/number ('stopping down', as it's also called) increases the depth of field, which means that larger portions of the picture will appear in focus.
For mushroom macro work using a digital compact camera, this whole theory also has one especially relevant implication:
- You generally want to use a large aperture (=small f/number), as mushrooms tend to grow in dark spots and you want to do everything to get as high as possible shutter speeds to prevent motion blur. You noticed that :wink: This also means that you're likely to get nicely blurry backgrounds with only the mushroom in focus. It seems you chose this route, so that's good. On a digicompact, I always use the largest aperture available for mushroom shots.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #12491540 - 05/02/10 01:08 AM (9 years, 19 days ago)

At the risk of blowing my own horn, I wrote an equipment guide in Mycena News a few years back. The two articles can be found with my other MN articles here:

http://www.mykoweb.com/articles/index.html#apm1_9

One difference I have since then is that my opinion of "digital minis" is much lower now than it was a few years ago, at least based on what I've been using. From what I've seen, camera manufacturers used to make some really high functioning digital minis with a host of functions that a skilled "pro-sumer" photographer can make use of. However, about two years ago I "upgraded" from the Nikon CoolPix 4500 to the Nikon Coolpix S10, and I couldn't believe just how dumbed down it was. The only improvements I could see were greater megapixels, lighter weight, and longer battery life. But so many functions were removed: *no* manual focus (which you *need* if you're going to shoot macro in low light), no manual control of aperture and exposure time (only +/- third stops on top of auto exposure), no more possibility of saving as TIFFs, much less RAW, (JPEGs are lossy).

Reading reviews of digital minis, it seems like a line of cameras intermediate between "point and shoot" and digital SLR is increasingly non-existent. More generally, I'll always recommend an actual SLR with a macro lens if you can afford one. I have yet to see a digital viewscreen that is even remotely close to what you get from actually being able to look right through the lens, and most of my best photos have been done on SLR.


Edited by Strophariaceae (05/02/10 01:09 AM)


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Strophariaceae]
    #12491713 - 05/02/10 02:04 AM (9 years, 19 days ago)

Nice article Stroph -

Just a couple of comments.

it makes sense that given the same photographer, that the pics taken with the SLR would be superior.

Canon (maybe others?) do make some pro-sumer models still.  I have the A640 which is a point and shoot, but does have more bells and whistles (including manual mode, etc.)  WIth a firmware hack you can even shoot RAW.

They also make the "G" series cameras, which have almost the same functionality as a DSLR, but crammed into a point and shoot body.  Obviously if you had to choose a DSLR would be better due to the larger sensor and the ability to purchase nice glass, but the G series is capable of some real photography.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: ShockValue]
    #12583873 - 05/18/10 07:48 AM (9 years, 3 days ago)

Howdy all, thanks for the fantastic thread, as I am very new to both mushrooms and photography there is a large amount of information for me to work through here. Hopefully leading to much better shots.  :thumbup:

If you guys get a chance to, it would be greatly appreciated if you could have a quick squizz at the photos I posted here http://www.shroomery.org/forums/showflat.php/Number/12565627 and offer any advise or tips for bringing the scenes to life a little more.

These were shot with a Panasonic lumix DMC-FS3 I have recently upgraded to a Canon Powershot SX 20 IS and hopefully will get out this weekend to give it a good trial run.

Thanks again for the great thread and info.  :laugh:


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: ShockValue]
    #12583918 - 05/18/10 08:20 AM (9 years, 3 days ago)

Quote:

ShockValue said:
it makes sense that given the same photographer, that the pics taken with the SLR would be superior.



Only if said photographer is well-versed in the use of SLR equipment. Your regular run-off-the-mill aspiring enthusiast will fuck up SLR shots due to motion blur, lack of focus (i.e. no understanding of the concept of depth of field), wrong exposure, etc.

Regarding the pro-sumer minis: it seems to me that segment is expanding rather than diminishing. There's dozens and dozens of minis that are very usable for mushroom photography. Also, the quality of EVF's has been on the increase and is now coming in a useful range.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: koraks]
    #12705483 - 06/07/10 10:25 PM (8 years, 11 months ago)

I can't say i've ever used the Macro Mode on my DSLR, as the settings are no different than what can be found/used in Manual Mode. A macro mode will simply fix the settings, which I consider to be slightly restrictive. That being said, I pretty much always shoot in Av Mode and never use a flash.

Dim lighting & no flash is really where a DSLR can shine. Not that i've ever needed to, but where lighting is an issue, there is always the option of bumping the ISO to, say, 800 for a faster shutter speed and hopefully walk away with minimal noise/grain. It is the lens on your DSLR which determines how close you can focus to an object. The minimum focus distance I can get with my Tamron 17-50mm is 27cm, which is useful enough for close stuff for me. cyanide9 sugested something useful, and that is to back away from the subject slightly and zoom in on it. The only thing you will have to keep in mind is that you will probably have a lower shutter speed depending on what camera/lens you are using.

P&S cameras do have a tendency to blow out skies and that is why eliminating a blown out sky all together is always the best option. Frame the subject accordingly and get down low! Another option is too shoot in RAW where you will have more play in the post processing, by this I mean the image won't deteriorate as much with aggressive image editing.

The main problem i've faced with taking photos close up, without a flash & tripod, is the incredibly shallow DOF. My lens can shoot at F2.8, but when getting this close to the subject the part of the image in focus could only be as deep as 3-5mm. I find stopping down to F3.5-F5.6 is a must.

Anyway, I hope this hasn't bored too many. Happy snapping :wink:

This is my favourite mushroom shot of this year so far. Shot at 50mm (75mm in full frame/35mm equiv) F3.5. Sharpened up & sepia cast applied in Lightroom 2.



--------------------
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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #12716784 - 06/09/10 09:27 PM (8 years, 11 months ago)

This is the best tip! I wish I would have read this before my hike but I'm now so obsessed with this "Macro-mode" Can't wait to get out tomorrow and test it on some mushrooms! Thanks.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: bpayne61984]
    #12718784 - 06/10/10 04:42 AM (8 years, 11 months ago)

Do note that this whole business about the macro mode not being relevant is only true for (D)SLR cameras. For regular compact cameras, a macro mode is still a necessity for mushroom photography.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: koraks]
    #12787232 - 06/22/10 10:35 PM (8 years, 10 months ago)

Shooting macro gets you better bokeh, however I have noticed that some mushroom shots fair better if you skip the macro and just use a bigger f stop and manually focus.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Mrs.trigger]
    #12899054 - 07/14/10 07:09 PM (8 years, 10 months ago)

ZOMG the macro! finally my shrooms look purty!!!

lots'o'thankzorz dude!!


--------------------
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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Shroomasauraus Rex]
    #13021382 - 08/08/10 01:44 PM (8 years, 9 months ago)

Hey everyone,

i live in san diego and one of my friends sent me these photos of a mushroom she found...can i get an id? I am still a little new to this and i would feel safer if i had some community opinions...thanks



--------------------
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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: ShadowYogi]
    #13021456 - 08/08/10 02:05 PM (8 years, 9 months ago)

This is the wrong thread. Start your own thread for an ID request and include all the information it asks for.

That said... your mushrooms looks like a Macrolepiota or Chlorophyllum.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: TimmiT]
    #13062383 - 08/17/10 02:24 AM (8 years, 8 months ago)

Ive got some mushroom pictures I took in West seattle last November.
Fly Agaric and psilocybe cyanescens in here I believe.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/28779352@N00/sets/72157623286886568/


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Theobroma]
    #13062877 - 08/17/10 07:40 AM (8 years, 8 months ago)

Thanks for sharing, lovely!  I wonder if the first one is an emerging Squamanita, but if you don't have photography tips and fancy an ID please start a thread and embed the shots there.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Joie]
    #13202973 - 09/16/10 09:12 AM (8 years, 7 months ago)

Awesome!


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #13804494 - 01/17/11 10:13 PM (8 years, 4 months ago)

Photography has been a hobby for 10 years, the colors can make the pictures come alive. Thanks for the tips. I've never thought of photographing shrooms. I think I'll try.
Thanks


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: morbidangel]
    #14552126 - 06/02/11 08:13 PM (7 years, 11 months ago)

Yay I can post in it again.

Here's some usefull links for you fine folks.

Gimp - Totally awesome and free editing program, which is very intuitive and easy to use.

Picturenaut - Free HDR (High Dynamic Range) program.  Allows the user to combine multiple versions of the same picture with different exposure settings, allowing dark areas of a shot to be lit up fully without creating problems in the lighter areas of a shot.

CombineZP - Free focus stacking software.  Allows combining of multiple versions of the same image taken at different focus distances to allow for a greater depth of field, paticularily useful in macro photography and microscopy.



Cheers.  :mushroom2:


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #15112946 - 09/21/11 06:56 PM (7 years, 7 months ago)

:wink: Always!



--------------------
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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: rev0kadavur]
    #15114538 - 09/22/11 12:23 AM (7 years, 7 months ago)

What is the ID of those red beauties?

Would it have been cheating to take that leaf matter off the one fruit?

;0)

JD


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Javadog]
    #15115445 - 09/22/11 04:21 AM (7 years, 7 months ago)

Quote:

Javadog said:
What is the ID of those red beauties?



Hygrocybe sp. I'd say.

Quote:

Would it have been cheating to take that leaf matter off the one fruit?



No, I wouldn't have considered it cheating.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: koraks]
    #15115988 - 09/22/11 09:23 AM (7 years, 7 months ago)

Cool.  Thanks.

Looking up the genus, I was struck by the fact that most of the
species that have elaborating links were from down under:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Hygrocybe_species

I guess the Aussies are out in front in getting good data into the wiki.

Waxy caps....I might've thought of that...

JD


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: koraks]
    #15118653 - 09/22/11 07:57 PM (7 years, 7 months ago)

Hygrocybe miniata was the closest ID I could make.. im still a little unsure, as there were many different hygrocybes around, including h. coccinea, splendidissima, conica, singeri, cantharellus, virginea, and several others i couldnt quite figure out.. one in particular that was a red cap, yellow stipe fading to green... im sure its hygrocybe.. any clues??


-no its not cheating, but I had so many other pictures to take, some just don't get special treatment!


--------------------
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Edited by rev0kadavur (09/22/11 08:16 PM)


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: rev0kadavur]
    #15136348 - 09/26/11 12:48 PM (7 years, 7 months ago)

So I'm thinking about getting a camera, but I only have about $100. Anyone got any recommendations? I know most cheap digital cameras these days are all loaded with censors and pretty much do all the work for you, is there any brands that aren't like that?


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Ran-D]
    #15136433 - 09/26/11 01:12 PM (7 years, 7 months ago)

The Canon Powershot A1200 or Powershot SD1300 are priced pretty low and take great pictures.  You should be able to find even cheaper used ones on ebay or craigslist. 

In the low end cameras they take away the manual modes (M, AV, P) and just give you automatic, which really sucks.  I almost always shoot in M, AV or P. 

Sorry to hear that they are starting to put censors in cameras.  Do they only censor full nudity or do they refuse to take pics of topless people too?  If technology keeps progressing in this direction, soon you will only be able to photograph edible and poisonous mushrooms and you'll have to use an old camera with no censor to take pictures of active species.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #15136469 - 09/26/11 01:21 PM (7 years, 7 months ago)

Quote:

Alan Rockefeller said:

Sorry to hear that they are starting to put censors in cameras.  Do they only censor full nudity or do they refuse to take pics of topless people too?  If technology keeps progressing in this direction, soon you will only be able to photograph edible and poisonous mushrooms and you'll have to use an old camera with no censor to take pictures of active species.




:lol: You caught my spelling error, I may have had a little too much medicine this morning... :stoned2:


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Ran-D]
    #15137096 - 09/26/11 04:02 PM (7 years, 7 months ago)

Craigslist is a very decent option as well. I buy most of my large purchases on that site now as strange as that might sound. In a few seconds of searching the one for my area I found a Fujifilm Finepix S2800 camera with tripod and small SD card for $90 :thumbup:

Just make sure you meet the person face-to-face, test out/inspect the item thoroughly, and bring a friend with you.


--------------------
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The bulb is the bulb.

The volva is the volva.

They have a very long term realtionship, but they’re “just friends.”


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #15204579 - 10/10/11 12:03 PM (7 years, 7 months ago)

I'm hoping this will help myself and others. I've seen both macroscopic and microscopic images taken that include a measurement guide/key.

Macroscopic: http://agrozoo.net/jsp/Galery_one_image.jsp?id_galery_obfuscated=9932f28a9cab474fa5692162d1c2879a

Microscopic: http://www.shroomery.org/forums/usergallery.php/pid/620077

How does one add an accurate ruler/guide/key thingamajig? Also, are people like Workman using Photoshop to make the multi-image picture above?


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: The Lightning]
    #15207674 - 10/10/11 11:27 PM (7 years, 7 months ago)

The Gimp is good free software for image editing.  It is good for cropping and enhancing mushroom pictures, as well as making composite images.  It does most things photoshop can do and works on mac, linux and windows.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #15260944 - 10/22/11 10:56 AM (7 years, 6 months ago)

thanks for this


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: tgzander]
    #15265852 - 10/23/11 01:33 PM (7 years, 6 months ago)

I just uploaded a bunch of pictures to my computer, went through them all and everything seemed fine. Then I uploaded a few to the Shroomery and they somehow got resized and they're tiny. Now even when I open my documents on my computer they're tiny too. What the fuck happened? :confused:


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Ran-D]
    #15267557 - 10/23/11 07:05 PM (7 years, 6 months ago)

"Now even when I open my documents on my computer they're tiny too."

This suggests that something happened on your system.

Perhaps they were just tiny, and your image viewer expanded them for you?

Good luck,

JD


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Javadog]
    #15267565 - 10/23/11 07:09 PM (7 years, 6 months ago)

Quote:

Javadog said:
"Now even when I open my documents on my computer they're tiny too."

This suggests that something happened on your system.

Perhaps they were just tiny, and your image viewer expanded them for you?

Good luck,

JD




Something weird was happening in my system I agree. It would go back and forth; I'd open them normal size, close it, and re-open and they'd be small.

After a while I opened them at the normal size, and sent them all to another folder and uploaded them from there with success. Still don't really get why that happened though :shrug:


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Ran-D]
    #15306631 - 11/01/11 01:48 AM (7 years, 6 months ago)

What is the best resolution for displaying pictures on this site?


--------------------
May you be filled with loving kindness.
May you be well.
May you be peaceful and at ease.
May you be happy.



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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: maynardjameskeenan]
    #15307155 - 11/01/11 05:06 AM (7 years, 6 months ago)

Depends on what kind of display is being used to view the pictures.  I use images that are 640 or 960 pixels wide.

640 is kind of small but is viewable by everyone.  960 is nice and big but too large for systems with smaller screens.

There is a "max width of offsite images" setting that you can use if images appear too large.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #15320769 - 11/04/11 07:55 AM (7 years, 6 months ago)

I use a maximum dimension (width for landscape, height for portrait) of 700px. I find this is on the small size given today's high-resolution screens. I'd recommend using a maximum dimension of 850-900px; it'll work ok for most screens, although some people will have to scroll the portrait pics.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: koraks]
    #15335878 - 11/07/11 02:18 PM (7 years, 6 months ago)

Great thread, answers questions I didn't even know to ask :crazy:

Here's my unanswered question though,

I have an HP Photosmart digital, model 945.  This camera kicks ass, especially because it has 56x zoom and takes great photos from two feet away and zoomed all the way to 56.  The problem it has (or I have) is that the pictures turn 'cold' or blue and are distorted from 'true color'
example:
First pic no zoom, camera within a foot of subject

Now, at 56x zoom. 


I have the following menu on the camera:
EV compensation
White balance
AE metering
ISO speed
Digital flash
Color (full color)
Resolution
Saturation
Compression
Sharpness
Contrast

What steps can I take to adjust for the max zoom, allowing continuity in color?


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: riverdweller]
    #15335900 - 11/07/11 02:21 PM (7 years, 6 months ago)

Your camera's white balance is obviously thrown way off. In default setting, most cameras automatically choose a white balance to match the quality of the light. But this mechanism is rarely accurate, and almost never matches the intentions of the photographer. In situations like that, you could try manually setting the white balance to match the scene. Usually, pre-sets like 'cloudy', 'shade', 'daylight', 'incandescent' or 'fluorescent' are available. When I shoot mushrooms with a compact camera, I use either 'shade' or 'daylight' 99% of the time.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: koraks]
    #15335924 - 11/07/11 02:26 PM (7 years, 6 months ago)

perfect! thank you koraks.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: riverdweller]
    #15338969 - 11/08/11 02:20 AM (7 years, 6 months ago)

Quote:

riverdweller said:
I have an HP Photosmart digital, model 945.  This camera kicks ass, especially because it has 56x zoom and takes great photos from two feet away and zoomed all the way to 56.  The problem it has (or I have) is that the pictures turn 'cold' or blue and are distorted from 'true color'






You probably want manual white balance.  See your camera's user guide page 44 and carry something white with you when you go mushroom hunting.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #15339676 - 11/08/11 10:01 AM (7 years, 6 months ago)

Thanks Alan, especially for the user's guide. I bought the camera on ebay and it didn't come with one.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: riverdweller]
    #15341114 - 11/08/11 05:58 PM (7 years, 6 months ago)

Even after I re-size my photo's with irfanview and upload them they still come up being expandable thumbnails, how do I correct this? I would like my photo's displayed in full size with no expansion. I have noticed that most of the moderators will have threads with full size photos so I know it can be done. So if you could tell me how you guys are going about uploading and displaying your pictures to make them look so brilliant?


--------------------
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May you be well.
May you be peaceful and at ease.
May you be happy.



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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: maynardjameskeenan]
    #15342947 - 11/09/11 03:58 AM (7 years, 6 months ago)

Host your pictures on mushroomobserver.org.  Right click on the image to get the full URL, then paste that between [img] tags in your posts.

You can change the size of the pics by changing the number in the URL.  640 or 960 are good sizes.

All pictures hosted on shroomery are thumbnails until you click on them.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #15403019 - 11/21/11 03:17 PM (7 years, 5 months ago)

Quote:

Alan Rockefeller said:
You probably want manual white balance.  See your camera's user guide page 44 and carry something white with you when you go mushroom hunting.




Just wanted to thank you again for the info and instructions.  I used the manual white balance feature as per instruction and my photos turned out
much better!
Thanks!


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: riverdweller]
    #15403131 - 11/21/11 03:41 PM (7 years, 5 months ago)

All photos always turn out better with manual white balance.

Unless you shoot in raw and correct it later.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #15403184 - 11/21/11 03:50 PM (7 years, 5 months ago)

This is true :thumbup:


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: koraks]
    #15967376 - 03/19/12 03:20 PM (7 years, 2 months ago)

How do you guys edit out unwanted objects in photos? I've noticed that being done on here a lot lately..

For instance, how would I get the fence out of these pictures?


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Ran-D]
    #15967955 - 03/19/12 05:59 PM (7 years, 2 months ago)

This was just a quick five-minute jaunt in Gimp 2.6:


I used the Clone Tool (little rubber stamp looking thing) which allows you to pick an area of the photo and paint that over whatever you want. For the sky you just press and hold the Control button then click a part of the sky which looks like what the sky should in that spot. Then you use the Heal tool (crossed bandaids) to blend the areas and make it smooth.

The fence area is a little bit trickier, but apply the same concepts. Choose a patch of background within each diamond-shaped fence section to paint over the foreground fence. Then Heal as you would with the sky. As with any Photoshop/Gimp adventure, zooming in and taking your time will give much better results. For the actual metal fence links, choose other fence links as your starting paint. Don't Heal the fence links though.

Let me know if I need to explain myself better. Keep in mind there may be better options as well, but this is how I proceed for not terribly important photos.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Ran-D]
    #15968536 - 03/19/12 08:12 PM (7 years, 2 months ago)

Yeah, use a healing tool in Gimp or Photoshop or some other editing suite that has some sort of retouching tools. Unless you're very skilled with those, you are going to leave noticeable marks on the bird in both pics though. The best way to free your photos of such object is to avoid unwanted objects when you shoot the pics :shrug:


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: koraks]
    #15968823 - 03/19/12 09:15 PM (7 years, 2 months ago)

Quote:

koraks said:
The best way to free your photos of such object is to avoid unwanted objects when you shoot the pics :shrug:





Thirty seconds with the camera will save 20 minutes in the gimp, but I think the feathers on the bird from just above the fence could be successfully cloned over the fence links.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: koraks]
    #15968962 - 03/19/12 09:43 PM (7 years, 2 months ago)

Quote:

koraks said:
The best way to free your photos of such object is to avoid unwanted objects when you shoot the pics :shrug:




That was a pretty tough shot to get, I was practically crawling closer and closer, standing up for a shot would have spooked him for sure.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Ran-D]
    #16009087 - 03/28/12 04:08 PM (7 years, 1 month ago)

are macros made for phone cameras?


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: kingkey24]
    #16009149 - 03/28/12 04:21 PM (7 years, 1 month ago)

Depends on the phone. Sparkle has argued that nearly all phones with a camera will have macro mode. Mine does, but it's a Samsung Epic 4g so fairly new.


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The bulb is the bulb.

The volva is the volva.

They have a very long term realtionship, but they’re “just friends.”


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: kingkey24]
    #16009421 - 03/28/12 05:23 PM (7 years, 1 month ago)

Quote:

kingkey24 said:
are macros made for phone cameras?





Yes.  Some people put a magnifying lens in front of the phone camera, or shoot through a loupe.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #16124426 - 04/22/12 04:02 PM (7 years, 28 days ago)

Lately all my photos have been too large to upload on here, even one at a time. Is this because of a setting on my camera?


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Ran-D]
    #16124455 - 04/22/12 04:13 PM (7 years, 28 days ago)

What megapixel are you shooting at? You could get away with bumping it down I'm sure.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Gravija]
    #16124570 - 04/22/12 04:52 PM (7 years, 28 days ago)

If you crop the photos down a bit that will also decrease the file size. Another option is to change the JPEG settings from very fine to fine, or if you are shooting in RAW format change to very fine JPEG.


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Rod Tulloss said:

The bulb is the bulb.

The volva is the volva.

They have a very long term realtionship, but they’re “just friends.”


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Ran-D]
    #16126933 - 04/23/12 02:39 AM (7 years, 27 days ago)

Quote:

Ran-D said:
How do you guys edit out unwanted objects in photos? I've noticed that being done on here a lot lately..

For instance, how would I get the fence out of these pictures?





I know I'm late giving this suggestion, but if you have access to Photoshop CS5, they did an amazing upgrade to the Spot Healing brush, where if you choose Content Aware Fill you can literally erase your fence line with a sweep of the brush. I had a similar challenge to erase a fence that was in front of a zebra, and this made it so easy. It does all the cloning work for you. This video demonstrates it pretty well.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Ran-D]
    #16127057 - 04/23/12 03:33 AM (7 years, 27 days ago)

Quote:

Ran-D said:
Lately all my photos have been too large to upload on here, even one at a time. Is this because of a setting on my camera?




I still shoot at the highest settings I can, but I normally resize the images once I am finished editing to 1200x800.

You can resize your shots in a lot of programs, I find Gimp really handy though as it is really versatile with it's editing options.....and it's free!


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Stopwhispering]
    #16183819 - 05/05/12 12:10 AM (7 years, 15 days ago)

Thanks Alan good post!!!


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Ran-D]
    #16185482 - 05/05/12 12:24 PM (7 years, 15 days ago)

Quote:

Ran-D said:
Lately all my photos have been too large to upload on here, even one at a time. Is this because of a setting on my camera?




Upload them on MO, then post them here!


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Byrain]
    #16233503 - 05/15/12 05:30 AM (7 years, 5 days ago)

Some quick notes on white balance.

I have noticed many occasions where mushrooms have been hard if not impossible to identify due to pictures taken indoors with traditional incandescent bulbs or "warm white" fluorescent and LED lighting.

The warm temperature of lighting used for domestic purposes is very yellow compared to natural daylight, and usually sits around the 2.7-4000 kelvin mark. We use this temperature range in houses because it is less harsh and makes a home look more inviting/warm.  The downside is that it makes for terrible photographs where the camera is not adjusted accordingly.

There are two ways to negate this problem, either set your camera's white balance to "tungsten" if you are able to, or light it with a more naturaly coloured light source (Either a higher temperature bulb close to 6500 kelvin, or ideally the sun).

If you are using a camera that allows you to choose your white balance setting you should do so as often as possible and ignore the auto setting. White balance can be fixed after the shot, and paticularily well if you are shooting in RAW format, it is normally easier to just get it right from the beginning though.

Example from my own photography.



Incorrect colour - Full auto, with flash.




Getting closer - No flash, long exposure, and "cloudy" setting for white balance.




The best I could get was still not how I saw the mushroom in daylight with this angle.

Here is the actual colour of the pore surface:




This photo was shot was the same settings as the last, and in addition some minor adjustments in Gimp which brought it to exactly the colour I saw.

The example I have given is probably only a good reference to taking more appealing photos, rather than one that accurately shows how poor white balance can throw off colours enough to make ID impossible. I have noticed this mostly occurs with camera phone shots taken under a traditional style lightbulb. I will take some shots and update this in the next day or so to highlight what I am talking about.

Cheers all. :mushroom2:


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Stopwhispering]
    #16356435 - 06/09/12 04:12 PM (6 years, 11 months ago)

This may be answered elsewhere but I am still learning all this stuff. Is it possible to upload to either this site or one of the image hosters directly from the iPhone or do I have to put them on a computer first? Thx in advance


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Jondspops]
    #16356446 - 06/09/12 04:14 PM (6 years, 11 months ago)

You can email from an iphone to a photobucket account, then include the images in your posts here.  Photobucket gives you an email address that includes a PIN, you just send the email and they go into your account.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #16356506 - 06/09/12 04:26 PM (6 years, 11 months ago)

There is so many different kinds of mushrooms out there i dont know where to start, but i strive to know more thanks for the tips though


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: birdbrain92]
    #16358628 - 06/10/12 12:15 AM (6 years, 11 months ago)

Yea makes sense. Didn't even think about emailing them. Thanks!


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #16364533 - 06/11/12 06:59 AM (6 years, 11 months ago)

I want to buy some new lens for my camera, can anyone suggest a good macro lens for under £300??? I have a canon EOS 1100D.

I also want to buy a zoom lens and I've noticed that some zoom lens also offer macro (at less than a 1:1) at certain focal lengths- are these worth buying? Sigma and Tamron both make cheap lens offfering this for under £150.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: hungrygoldfish]
    #16364538 - 06/11/12 07:01 AM (6 years, 11 months ago)

Quote:

hungrygoldfish said:
I want to buy some new lens for my camera, can anyone suggest a good macro lens for under £300??? I have a canon EOS 1100D.

I also want to buy a zoom lens and I've noticed that some zoom lens also offer macro (at less than a 1:1) at certain focal lengths- are these worth buying? Sigma and Tamron both make cheap lens offfering this for under £150.




Have you tried using reversing rings on whichever lens you have, I have not tried them but I hear they work brilliantly well and are very affordable.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Stopwhispering]
    #16364564 - 06/11/12 07:21 AM (6 years, 11 months ago)

I bought one but it was the wrong size- I should have checked first!

What I actually want is Canon MP-E but the price is just silly.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: hungrygoldfish]
    #16364565 - 06/11/12 07:23 AM (6 years, 11 months ago)

This is the one I use it is an excellent lens, but still a bit above your price range.

I am not really sure how the cheaper macro lenses fair tbh. They could be quite good I just don't know.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Stopwhispering]
    #16364864 - 06/11/12 10:24 AM (6 years, 11 months ago)

I've yet to try a reversing ring, but Ive taken quite a few shots with extension tubes. I would save my $ and get a real macro lens, hungry. Specifically the 100mm 2.8 that SW suggested.

From what I can gather, the MP-E would be pretty much useless for all but the very smallest mushrooms. It's begging magnification is 1:1 and it only gets closer from there!


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Stopwhispering]
    #16366464 - 06/11/12 06:12 PM (6 years, 11 months ago)

Quote:

Stopwhispering said:
This is the one I use it is an excellent lens, but still a bit above your price range.





I just bought it! I've been thinking about getting a macro lens for ages now and I'm going to be using it so much anyway.

The next thing on my list to get is a neutral density filter- there seem to be quite a range of prices...


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Gravija]
    #16366596 - 06/11/12 06:52 PM (6 years, 11 months ago)

Quote:

Gravija said:
From what I can gather, the MP-E would be pretty much useless for all but the very smallest mushrooms. It's begging magnification is 1:1 and it only gets closer from there!





I looked at that lens and came to that conclusion as well.  Also with that lens, a ring flash would be required for most mushroom photography since you have to be really close and there isn't always a lot of light in deep woods.  I think a good 50mm or 100mm macro lens would be a better choice.  You don't want _only_ a macro lens though - If you are just going to have one lens, get something like the Canon 18-200 zoom lenses, which are great and versatile as well, with good performance both for macro shots and for more standard zoomed-out photography.  If you already have something like an 18-72mm kit lens, a macro lens would be a good choice.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #16402404 - 06/19/12 09:54 AM (6 years, 10 months ago)

I currently have a Canon 1000 E i believe but the macro isn;'t the best and i'm a broke student so a fancy new lens is out of the question but i've seen some small disc like clip on macro filters.

What i was wondering was if anyone has used them before, i really want to learn more photography before spending 300 on a macro lens.

S&T


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Smokeandtoke]
    #16405437 - 06/19/12 08:55 PM (6 years, 10 months ago)

You might be able to get some good shots with such a setup, but depth of field will likely be very poor meaning obtaining a photo that is not blurry will be more difficult. Also, the photo quality will only be as good as the lens/filter combo you throw on there so if it's poor quality clip-on then your photos will suffer. It might be worth a try though depending on just how cheap you can make it happen. :cheers:


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The bulb is the bulb.

The volva is the volva.

They have a very long term realtionship, but they’re “just friends.”


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #16419967 - 06/22/12 01:07 PM (6 years, 10 months ago)

My macro lens still hasn't arrived yet- getting impatient now :mad:

I did just order a new camera to go with the lens though- it's a Canon EOS 7D!!!


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: hungrygoldfish]
    #16420016 - 06/22/12 01:17 PM (6 years, 10 months ago)

Dammmmmmnnnnn dude. Can't wait to see what that does for your photography! The 7D is bad as hell!


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Gravija]
    #16420332 - 06/22/12 02:43 PM (6 years, 10 months ago)

I got an amazon credit card when I was looking for my macro lens- I just kind of maxed it out, I bought another lens and some filters and stuff with my new camera (Interest free for 13 months) :grin:

I'm really enjoying taking pictures with my camera and editing them etc so I thought why not do it properly...next stage is to get my photoshop skills good.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: hungrygoldfish]
    #16420436 - 06/22/12 03:10 PM (6 years, 10 months ago)

My sister is a professional photographer. She showed me how to use PhotoShop yesterday... So so so cool. Layers are so useful! I've always wanted away to expose particular elements without brightening the entire pic. And the clone tool is just amazing...

I applaud your decision! My wife would decapitate me.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Gravija]
    #16420899 - 06/22/12 04:46 PM (6 years, 10 months ago)

If you have your own money just buy what you want and tell your wife to accept your decision!

I've been using abode lightroom until recently which is also really great but I like using layers in photoshop, I've downloaded quite a few tutorials on it...lynda.com is a good site for tutorials...the photography ones are quite good.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: hungrygoldfish]
    #16420945 - 06/22/12 05:00 PM (6 years, 10 months ago)

:lol: you aren't married, are you? I
'm saving up for it. Wifes a teacher- teacher/student edition ftw!

I'll check out that site, thx for the tip!


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Gravija]
    #16420961 - 06/22/12 05:04 PM (6 years, 10 months ago)

Not married yet but living with my girlfriend (am saving up for it but keep spending my money on camera stuff :smile:).

I just say stuff like: 'when we have children we won't be able to afford to buy expensive stuff so we might as well buy it now we have the chance'...that seems to work :laugh:.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: hungrygoldfish]
    #16421006 - 06/22/12 05:17 PM (6 years, 10 months ago)

If I bought a new camera and my wife/girlfriend got mad about it I would totally kick her to the curb and get a new one.

Life is too short to go through it with subpar photography equipment.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #16421305 - 06/22/12 06:15 PM (6 years, 10 months ago)

My girlfriend was ok when I told her that I bought a new camera I even gave her my EOS 1100D...she's great.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #16421400 - 06/22/12 06:33 PM (6 years, 10 months ago)

Quote:

Alan Rockefeller said:
If I bought a new camera and my wife/girlfriend got mad about it I would totally kick her to the curb and get a new one.

Life is too short to go through it with subpar photography equipment.



:rofl: :lol: I am starting to realize your priories in life :thumbup: :congrats:


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: hungrygoldfish]
    #16421637 - 06/22/12 07:31 PM (6 years, 10 months ago)

Quote:

hungrygoldfish said:
I even gave her my EOS 1100D...she's great.




Smart man :thumbup:

I'm going to upgrade to a t4 later this year. When I do, I'll try to sell my xti to someone here, on the super-cheap.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Gravija]
    #16424134 - 06/23/12 05:15 AM (6 years, 10 months ago)

My new camera just arrived- I ordered it at 16:00 yesterday and it arrived at 10:00 today- now that's fast! However they sent me the wrong type of memory card- I ordered CF and they sent me SD...:mad:

I also don't think that my macro lens is coming anytime soon, I've been waiting ages now and the seller on amazon is getting quite some negative feedback on his page for the last week or so, I sent him an email last night demanding a refund if he hasn't sent it out yet as it's been well over a week since he claimed he sent it and he's obviously lying, I'd rather pay extra and get it directly from amazon and get next day delivery.

Quote:

I'll try to sell my xti to someone here, on the super-cheap.




Sell it for what it's worth, don't cut yourself short, you can use the money to pay for your new camera or some extra equipment. My experience of selling things below market value to help people out has resulted in the other person selling on the equipment for what it's worth and making a profit (this wasn't camera stuff though).


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: hungrygoldfish]
    #16730740 - 08/20/12 12:25 PM (6 years, 8 months ago)

Hey guys... So I see you all have great cameras that put me to shame :frown:
I have a Canon Powershot A3300 IS that I bought last yeah but I'm not at all impressed with the Macro. I only bought it because I was using my Gf's Canon Powershot A460, which is old as the hills, but takes great macro shots. I assumed a newer powershot would be better. :facepalm:
Her old poweshot has a setting called super-macro which I guess may be the difference!
Do any of you know a decent Camera that I can use for P.Semilanceata photos, without buying a Macro lense for it? I'm really hoping to stay in the 200$ range so an SLR is outta my league... any help is appreciated... even if it's just some tips to help me use my A3300 because my macro are always blurry!

(If you would like me to start my own thread Please delete this... I've done that before but thought I may get more responses here)

Thanks in advance to anyone who offers suggestions :grin:


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Liberty King]
    #16730778 - 08/20/12 12:32 PM (6 years, 8 months ago)

The difference between a blurry shot with your current camera (and many others) may be the difference in the physical distance from the mushroom collection.

Every collection requires adjustments.

Try standing three feet from the collection, and adjust the zoom to two different settings. See which works best.

Then try standing four feet from the collection, and again switch the zoom.

Also, always shoot with the flash on, unless the flash is blurry.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: The Lightning]
    #16732216 - 08/20/12 04:57 PM (6 years, 8 months ago)

Quote:

Liberty King said:
So I see you all have great cameras that put me to shame :frown:
I have a Canon Powershot A3300 IS that I bought last yeah but I'm not at all impressed with the Macro.




I use the exact same camera, I've found that the quality is surprisingly good for such a cheap camera. I even had somebody ask what kind of lens I was using :lol:

Quote:

gsharpnolack said:
The difference between a blurry shot with your current camera (and many others) may be the difference in the physical distance from the mushroom collection.

Every collection requires adjustments.

Try standing three feet from the collection, and adjust the zoom to two different settings. See which works best.

Then try standing four feet from the collection, and again switch the zoom.

Also, always shoot with the flash on, unless the flash is blurry.




With this specific camera I actually avoid using the zoom and the flash, but then I'm just going by which pictures of mine have turned out better I have little to no knowledge of how cameras are designed to function.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Ran-D]
    #16734487 - 08/20/12 11:35 PM (6 years, 8 months ago)

you guys should try using a wide angle lens at minimum focusing distance. A telephoto or macro lens is only gonna give you a very narrow frame of view and is gonna result in boring shots that you can get with any camera/lens + cropping.

Here is an example of a mushroom shot with a fisheye. This is not my shot but illustrates well the shot I would try and get. The wide angle at minimum focusing distance allows you to get the mushroom to be "in your face" and clearly draws the viewers attention to it but at the same time allows the viewer to see a very large amount of background and really puts everything into context.



some pocket cameras can get plenty wide. Just go as wide as you possibly can, get as close as you possibly can, and choose the most interesting angle without shooting directly into the sun.


Edited by b0ngman (08/20/12 11:38 PM)


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: b0ngman]
    #16734539 - 08/20/12 11:45 PM (6 years, 8 months ago)

If you have an SLR I would not hesitate to buy this Rokinon fisheye. You will be able to get the shot above + a fisheye is a fantastically fun lens (especially while tripping... lol). A lot of people have trouble with spending $500 on a fisheye from The big names. This fisheye lens is made by a Korean company that owns Rokinon and Samyang. They produce all manual focus lenses for 1/4 to 1/2 of the Nikon/Canon counterpart.

The good thing about a fisheye its infinity focusing distance is 2 feet... so whenever your subject is beyond 2 feet focusing is cake. Also, your DSLR means you have infinite film basically so no worries if the focus is off in your first shot.

Here is that fisheye, it's legit:

http://www.amazon.com/Rokinon-FE8M-C-F3-5-Fisheye-Canon/dp/B002LTXQUE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1345520432&sr=8-1&keywords=rokinon+8mm+fisheye


Edited by b0ngman (08/20/12 11:46 PM)


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Ran-D]
    #16777920 - 09/02/12 08:17 PM (6 years, 8 months ago)

Rite on guys thanks for the input.. I'm just waiting for the lib season to start here, it's close though, I saw frost here this morning! I'll check back once I have some pics to critic!


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Liberty King]
    #16781923 - 09/03/12 04:51 PM (6 years, 8 months ago)

b0bgman, wide angle macro shots are definitely cool! Good advice right there.

Now for the iffy details: that minimum focus distance tends to be a bit of an issue with ultra wide angle/fisheye lenses. Yes, the hyperfocal distance is usually quite near, especially at the closest focus point. But...only 1/3 of your depth of field is in front of the focal spot, the other 2/3 are beyond it. In practice, that means that even with a small aperture setting (and hence the huge amount of diffraction that is inherent to any very short lens), you won't get tack sharp images. Unless, of course, your mushroom is really big, like the one in the example pic you posted.

Easy, you say! Just use an extension tube and shorten the focus distance even further! Yeah, true, but imagine you're using a 12mm lens, which on a cropfactor dSLR gives a nice and 'wide' perspective. Imagine you also have a 12mm extension tube. That means the reporduction size is 1:1. Yes, that's why I took 12mm focal length and a 12mm extension tube: it makes the math easier :wink: In layman's terms, this means that your amanita that you wanted to creep up to will be way too large - it will drop outside the frame on all sides. Plus, you need to creep up to your mushroom so your lens literally touches the mushroom. Apart from composition issues, this also brings all sorts of problems with shadows and whatnot with it. So with an extension tube, you will probably miss out on the focus distance that you would ideally use with mushrooms, which is something like 3-6 inches with most mushrooms and a really wide lens (12-14mm).

Is there an alternative? Yes, a screw-on macro lens. But that will bring an enormous amount of vignetting with a very wide lens.

To be honest, I haven't found a satisfactory solution for this yet. Maybe exactly the right combination of lens and extension tube will work. Or use a screw-on filter and take cropping into account when framing the shot so you can work around the vignetting.

Of course, for web purposes such as the image posted here, just about anything will do. But for a really good image, I haven't solved this puzzle yet. I'm open to suggestions on this. I must say that I haven't personally used the lens you link to. But with a minimal focus distance of 30cm/ca. 2ft and the huge vignetting (it's an 8mm fisheye after all), I'm not too sure I'd shell out the $250 or so to try it on for size.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: The Lightning]
    #16919860 - 09/27/12 12:39 PM (6 years, 7 months ago)

Alrite guys it's me again... "Mr. Can't take a picture to save his life" :facepalm:
Day one of Liberty Cap Hunting was almost a bust because of technical issues lol

I own a "Powershot A3300 IS" which takes alright pics but I have never been happy with the Macro, In order ta get a semi clear shot I have to be farther from the mushroom than I like...



I usually resort back to using my GF's "Powershot A460" which is old and clunky but has a setting for "Super Macro" which has captured some of my better Lib pics. Today however everything looked fine while taking the pic but once it was taken it was just an over exposed bright light.
I turned off the flash and played with the ISO settings but still no luck... So then I restored it back to the Factory settings and still the same issue... like this



I go on my annual Lib Vacation in a week so I'm kind of freaking out.. I'm hoping I can solve an issue or get a good recommendation for a good Macro Cam for around 200$ I realize a really good camera is out of this range but I'm hoping to find something comparable to the A460's Super Macro setting!

Any help is welcomed and thank you in advance!


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Liberty King]
    #16919900 - 09/27/12 12:47 PM (6 years, 7 months ago)

Your camera doesn't have manual focus, but the macro can focus 3cm from the lens, which is easily close enough.  It might be focusing on the grass instead though.  You might have luck getting the camera to focus on something like your hand about 5 cm away by pressing down the shutter half way, then move the camera 5cm from the mushroom and press the shutter down the rest of the way.

Regarding the a460, it appears to be broken.  Maybe you can get it to expose correctly with manual mode?  http://www.kenrockwell.com/canon/compacts/a460.htm implies that there is some kind of manual mode trick.

Did you try a hard reset as described in http://www.justanswer.com/video-camera-repair/51i5g-help-please-canon-powershot-a460-sudden.html ?

It appears that lots of people have had your problem.  Not sure if any of them solved it...


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #16919956 - 09/27/12 01:00 PM (6 years, 7 months ago)

Thanks Alan... as usual you're the man lol
I'll try some of those but I fear the A460 prob is broken!

The "hand focus" then move the cam trick sounds promising though because I do believe it is focusing in on the grass instead of the mushroom... It takes beautiful pics of other species but P.Semilanceata are such a small dulled color mushrooms it can be very tricky to get them good focus!

Thanks again.... and I'm sure you have a spectacular Camera yourself but any suggestion or things to look for that you would suggest?


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Liberty King]
    #16919966 - 09/27/12 01:02 PM (6 years, 7 months ago)

A camera with manual focus and manual shooting mode would help you a lot.  I always take pics in M now.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Liberty King]
    #16920389 - 09/27/12 02:34 PM (6 years, 7 months ago)

What mode are you shooting in with the AS3300(Program, Live, Automatic...)? Obviously Program is the best because it allows for the most control, but if you are having trouble with that try the Live mode. It makes things much simpler but still allows you to easily control the brightness and saturation of your photo.

Also, are you using a tripod? Even a small cheap one helps, I've found them at the dollar store.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: kingkey24]
    #17324684 - 12/03/12 04:02 AM (6 years, 5 months ago)
Log in to view attachment

\DUDE IM HAVING TROUBLE POSTING PICS IM NEW I AM ALL OF A SUDDEN OBBSESED WITH MUSHROOMSA LOVE EVERYTHING ABOUT EVERYTHING TO DO WITH THEM PLEASE HELP I HAD A COUPKLE OF ??? TO .THANKS


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Bluest cheese]
    #17326552 - 12/03/12 02:49 PM (6 years, 5 months ago)

If you click the "Pics" link at the top of every page, a new tab will
open in which you will find an "upload" link.

Select this link and specify the files to be uploaded.

Once you have the photos in your Pics, then you can copy the URL
that you need to paste into posts by just clicking on the image name.

Good luck,

JD

P.S. NO NEED TO SHOUT  :0)


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Javadog]
    #17416141 - 12/19/12 10:32 AM (6 years, 4 months ago)

wow i love your tips.thanks for sharing


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: jamescorn01]
    #18058048 - 04/04/13 04:50 PM (6 years, 1 month ago)

I have struggled to find a good solution to underexposing the top of the stipe and the gills when photographing mushrooms. The biggest transformation in my mushroom photography recently came from following The Thinker's (or was it vjp's?) advice about making a small light reflector out of scrap cardboard wrapped in aluminum (that's aluminium for you 'cross-the-pond wankers) foil with the shiny side out. Simply place the reflector where it sends light up underneath the mushroom and angle it up or down to shine on the stipe and gills/pore surface. No more underexposing the dark areas of the mushroom! This will also force you to more carefully choose your composition so you find the best light as well as to avoid the reflector showing up in all of your shots. Using the reflector and operating the camera at the same time can be tricky, so having a tripod and sometimes using the timer function are very useful.

You can also purchase a ready-made reflector but where's the fun in that?


Here is an example from before using a reflector in which the stipe and gills are strongly underexposed due to being shaded by the cap:



But now look at the difference with a bit of reflected light:





I hope this helps!


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: suchen]
    #18058398 - 04/04/13 06:00 PM (6 years, 1 month ago)

:brilliant:

:manofapproval: :fuckinawesome:

Thanks for sharing.  That last photo is perfect.  :0)

JD


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Javadog]
    #18399517 - 06/10/13 11:05 PM (5 years, 11 months ago)

When I first started shooting mushrooms, I would always stop down to around f32 to get the deepest DOF, but now I'm understanding that most lenses are sharpest around f8, and image quality suffers at these small apertures. Lately I've trying to shoot no higher than f16, and I've been getting sharper shots, but I'm wondering if it is worth the shallower DOF. Any advice?


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: o8u]
    #18399545 - 06/10/13 11:08 PM (5 years, 11 months ago)

Yes! If you have to stop down lower than f 10 to get your entire subject in focus then you are TOO CLOSE TO YOUR SUBJECT. Back off of it until the entire thing is in focus at f 10 or lower. This is much easier with a camera that has a screen and liveview as you can zoom the screen and manually focus your lens.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Gravija]
    #18399596 - 06/10/13 11:14 PM (5 years, 11 months ago)

Wow, thanks man. Right now I'm feeling :facepalm3: about my overreliance on tiny apertures. It sounds like I should probably be shooting with my 70-300 lens instead of my 18-55.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: o8u]
    #18399618 - 06/10/13 11:18 PM (5 years, 11 months ago)

Bring both and use whichever focal plane works best for the shot. If you want your pic to turn out roomy, with a sense of spaciousness then shoot at 30mm. If you want your shot to turn out tight on your subject shoot at 50-80mm. If you want your photo to turn out flat and landscapey then shoot at 100+.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Gravija]
    #18399645 - 06/10/13 11:21 PM (5 years, 11 months ago)

Damn man I have so much to learn about all this, how do you guys do it? Seriously, all this information is overwhelming for me.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Ran-D]
    #18399678 - 06/10/13 11:26 PM (5 years, 11 months ago)

I'll tell you how I do it- I beg vjp and thinker to share their sage wisdom with me. Without those guys I'd still be shooting like a n00b. Enjoy learning to shoot, it is exciting and rewarding.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Gravija]
    #18399702 - 06/10/13 11:29 PM (5 years, 11 months ago)

I enjoy the act of learning to shoot, I've just never been able to read instructions and do something. I'm definitely a hands on learner.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Gravija]
    #18400122 - 06/11/13 12:26 AM (5 years, 11 months ago)

Hmm, I have a lot of experimenting to do and a lot to learn. I was thinking that a longer focal length would give a deeper DOF, but according to this article, the difference is pretty much negligible. Thanks again for all your help Gravija :bow2:


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: o8u]
    #18400129 - 06/11/13 12:27 AM (5 years, 11 months ago)

Quote:

o8u said:
Thanks again for all your help Gravija :bow2:




Seconded :thumbup:


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Gravija]
    #18403133 - 06/11/13 03:26 PM (5 years, 11 months ago)

Quote:

Gravija said:
Yes! If you have to stop down lower than f 10 to get your entire subject in focus then you are TOO CLOSE TO YOUR SUBJECT.



I beg to differ. Don't you think about composition and perspective first and then work out the settings on your camera that would achieve the result you're looking for?

Quote:

Back off of it until the entire thing is in focus at f 10 or lower.



But that will also change the composition. See above. While you have a point, you're simply making a different photograph - one that may have the DoF you're looking for, but a different composition.

As to the subject of diffraction: it's obviously a real effect, but only a problem if you intend to view 100% crops a lot or if you intend to print on relative large formats. Especially in macro work, a smaller aperture (and the associated diffraction) with a large depth of field is usually a better tradeoff than a bigger aperture and a smaller DoF. Of course, YMMV.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: koraks]
    #18403191 - 06/11/13 03:37 PM (5 years, 11 months ago)

I went out and shot this



at the 11 different stops my lens could do in aperture priority mode. Even at higher than 100% magnification, I really couldn't see much difference in sharpness between f8 and f22. Outside that window, image quality noticeably suffered, but I wound up deciding the f16 shot looked the best.

:shrug:


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: koraks]
    #18403868 - 06/11/13 05:53 PM (5 years, 11 months ago)

Quote:

koraks said:

I beg to differ. Don't you think about composition and perspective first and then work out the settings on your camera that would achieve the result you're looking for?





No need to beg! I'll happily differ with you on this point. Of course one must compose one's shot. Typically, I frame my shot so the picture I want fills my entire, un-zoomed screen. Then, I apply some simple geometry to determine the position of the lens that will result in my shot occupying 2/3 or less of my screen. In post, I crop the photo as needed to achieve the frame I originally composed. The loss in image quality is negligible. I do use a pretty nice macro lens though.

Quote:

koraks said:
As to the subject of diffraction: it's obviously a real effect, but only a problem if you intend to view 100% crops a lot or if you intend to print on relative large formats. Especially in macro work, a smaller aperture (and the associated diffraction) with a large depth of field is usually a better tradeoff than a bigger aperture and a smaller DoF. Of course, YMMV.




How is a defracted, blurry image ever a better trade off than a pristine sharp picture full of detail? Why do macro photogs spend countless hours focus stacking, if a shot at F32 is a better alternative? To get a macro picture at f32 you must increase your iso or decrease your shutter speed, dramatically increasing chromatic aberrations. Is this an acceptable price to pay for a defracted shot?

Thanks for participating in this conversation, koraks. Your input is always appreciated.


08u- That last Mycena shot is great! Something I noticed though( this is something I have an enormous problem with myself) is that there is a bunch of plant matter, leaves and sticks and such, in the background of the shot, distracting the eye from your subject. I've started keeping long tweezers in my camera bag for cleaning stuff like that out of the frame.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Gravija]
    #18403943 - 06/11/13 06:07 PM (5 years, 11 months ago)

Quote:

o8u said:
at the 11 different stops my lens could do in aperture priority mode. Even at higher than 100% magnification, I really couldn't see much difference in sharpness between f8 and f22. Outside that window, image quality noticeably suffered, but I wound up deciding the f16 shot looked the best.





I find my shots look the best around f/16 as well.  For macro work, they look best at around f/22. 

I try to arrange the shot so I can use the largest aperture possible, but when I am with lots of people I just leave it at f/16 and flash everything.


Quote:

Gravija said:
How is a defracted, blurry image ever a better trade off than a pristine sharp picture full of detail?




The diffraction loss is pretty small even at f/32 unless you are heavily cropping.

Quote:

Why do macro photogs spend countless hours focus stacking, if a shot at F32 is a better alternative?




They have too much time on their hands.


Quote:

To get a macro picture at f32 you must increase your iso or decrease your shutter speed, dramatically increasing chromatic aberrations. Is this an acceptable price to pay for a defracted shot?




Usually it is.  Part of your subject being out of focus is a much worse defect than diffraction introduces.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #18403975 - 06/11/13 06:13 PM (5 years, 11 months ago)

You don't have to have part of your subject out of focus, you can increase your distance from the subject in order to utilize a larger aperture.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #18403998 - 06/11/13 06:16 PM (5 years, 11 months ago)

Quote:



The diffraction loss is pretty small even at f/32 unless you are heavily cropping.





We are talking about the difference in sharpness between f10 and f16+ here. The difference in sharpness and loss of light is huge on my lens, but you use an L series :shrug:


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Gravija]
    #18404062 - 06/11/13 06:31 PM (5 years, 11 months ago)

Right now I have the Canon EFS 18-200 on my camera, I'll have to try the same shot with this lens and my L series 100mm with all possible DOF's, and then make the 64 images into an animated gif.  And make another at 100% size, which will show a lot more difference.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #18404089 - 06/11/13 06:40 PM (5 years, 11 months ago)

That would be awesome.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Gravija]
    #18406201 - 06/12/13 01:52 AM (5 years, 11 months ago)

Quote:

Gravija said:
08u- That last Mycena shot is great! Something I noticed though( this is something I have an enormous problem with myself) is that there is a bunch of plant matter, leaves and sticks and such, in the background of the shot, distracting the eye from your subject. I've started keeping long tweezers in my camera bag for cleaning stuff like that out of the frame.




Wow, it's funny how you can miss what's right in front of you. The shot would definitely look better with a less busy background. Tweezers are going in the kit :super:

I've also been using a tinfoil reflector like suchen recommended, and it's made a huge difference in the quality of my shots. I haven't really delved into flash lighting, but recently I've been using some white sew-on velcro as a diffuser for my pop up and it looks way less harsh. I've also heard a strategically sliced ping pong ball or translucent white film canister will do the job, and this ringflash emulator looks promising...


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Gravija] * 1
    #18406818 - 06/12/13 05:17 AM (5 years, 11 months ago)

Quote:

Gravija said:
No need to beg! I'll happily differ with you on this point. Of course one must compose one's shot. Typically, I frame my shot so the picture I want fills my entire, un-zoomed screen. Then, I apply some simple geometry to determine the position of the lens that will result in my shot occupying 2/3 or less of my screen. In post, I crop the photo as needed to achieve the frame I originally composed. The loss in image quality is negligible. I do use a pretty nice macro lens though.



Well, everyone has his/her own way of working. I personally try to compose in such a way that I don't need to crop later on - then again, I generally don't like to spend much time in the digital darkroom anyway.
Btw, especially if you have a nice macro lens, diffraction shouldn't be much of an issue.

Quote:


How is a defracted, blurry image ever a better trade off than a pristine sharp picture full of detail? Why do macro photogs spend countless hours focus stacking, if a shot at F32 is a better alternative?



Because at large magnification, even f/32 or f/64 simply doesn't offer enough DoF, so they can only resort to focus stacking. Try shooting a tiny bug at 3:1 magnification and get its entire body in focus - you'll find that even the tiniest aperture that you can set on any macro lens will still only get its head in focus. The need to do focus stacking has very little (if anything) to do with diffraction. The process of focus stacking itself will introduce more artifacts than the slight unsharpness of diffraction caused by a typical macro lens.

Quote:

To get a macro picture at f32 you must increase your iso or decrease your shutter speed, dramatically increasing chromatic aberrations.



Chromatic aberration has nothing to do with shutter speed or ISO.
Also, every macro photographer knows that flash or a tripod (with motionless subjects) are the only ways to get a tack sharp picture. Your statement makes me believe that you are confusing diffraction with motion blur.

If you're shooting at tiny apertures and you see unsharpness in an image resized for web use or smaller prints (say, 8x10), then odds are you're looking at motion blur, misfocus or simply a still too shallow DoF instead of diffraction - assuming you are using a DSLR. In a compact camera, diffraction can be more of a real-life problem due to the smaller sensors, short focal lengths and the associated tiny aperture dimensions.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: koraks]
    #18409298 - 06/12/13 05:58 PM (5 years, 11 months ago)

So high Iso doesn't introduce green and red aberrations to an image as a result of noise? Small apertures don't result in softer focus?
Am I reading those statements right?


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Gravija]
    #18409463 - 06/12/13 06:33 PM (5 years, 11 months ago)

Perhaps we are talking about chroma noise instead of chromatic aberration?


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: suchen]
    #18410034 - 06/12/13 08:41 PM (5 years, 11 months ago)

how do color balance and contrast look to you guys?



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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Gravija]
    #18411782 - 06/13/13 02:33 AM (5 years, 11 months ago)

Quote:

Gravija said:
So high Iso doesn't introduce green and red aberrations to an image as a result of noise?



That's right. Yellow/red and cyan/blue fringing are optical artifacts that are the result of the fact that diffraction in a lens is dependent on the wavelength of the light.

Quote:

Small apertures don't result in softer focus?



A bit, depending on the physical size of the aperture. The longer the lens, the less diffraction becomes an issue. A typical macro lens is 100mm ~ 200mm and diffraction tends to be only minor at those focal lengths, even at e.g. f/32. On wide angle lenses, the problem is much more pronounced, since a shorter lens will naturally also have a physically smaller aperture.

Really, think about composition, preventing motion blur, good lighting, proper focus, depth of field etc. etc. etc. and then at the end of the line if there's really *nothing* left you could optimize, only then start worrying about diffraction. Unless you are using a digital compact camera (like I said before), they generally don't offer decent image quality beyond f/8, but that is (again) linked to their tiny sensors and ridiculously short focal lengths.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: The Thinker]
    #18412076 - 06/13/13 04:55 AM (5 years, 11 months ago)

Quote:

The Thinker said:
how do color balance and contrast look to you guys?






I'm not sure I'm qualified to judge balance and contrast, but that's a very professional and crisp photograph!

It is complemented by the background selected, as well as the ruler and species label. Well done!


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: The Lightning]
    #18415723 - 06/13/13 09:57 PM (5 years, 11 months ago)

so I'll assume colors or contrast aren't wildly off at least? can I get more input from people on anything they don't like about that pic? I'm not a puss so please try to bash it. serious scrutiny will help me get better, compliments won't. but thank you for the comments lightning

I know about the shadows but not worried about that atm


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: The Thinker]
    #18415810 - 06/13/13 10:15 PM (5 years, 11 months ago)

I would probably have a lot more input if I'd ever seen this species before in person. The picture is well lit. It seems homogeneously detailed, which is great for this type of picture. There seem to be three dominant shades of yellow, did you intend to highlight this variability? My only real complaint is that the binomial name isn't italicized:lol:


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: The Thinker]
    #18415827 - 06/13/13 10:19 PM (5 years, 11 months ago)

I can't blow the photo up, so I will say that right now it is difficult in some areas to see the contrast between bright yellows and whites on the Mitrula. Yellow and white mushrooms are inordinately difficult to capture well. Perhaps try slightly darker exposure for slightly more contrast?


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They have a very long term realtionship, but they’re “just friends.”


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: The Thinker] * 1
    #18417467 - 06/14/13 06:14 AM (5 years, 10 months ago)

Quote:

The Thinker said:
so I'll assume colors or contrast aren't wildly off at least? can I get more input from people on anything they don't like about that pic?



It's really quite well done and better than you'd usually get on the internet. If you're looking for points to improve your future work, here's some you can take into account:

- the yellows seem to be posterized; this usually is the result of either overexposure or digitally compressed dynamic range. You can try to expose a little bit shorter (e.g. -0.5 stop exposure compensation) and shoot in raw instead of jpeg (if you haven't done so). Another cause for posterized colors is the use of a badly balanced light source; regular light bulbs tend to posterize reds and yellows, while cfl's do the same thing to greens and yellows. The light of dusk or dawn may do the same thing, but less pronounced. For pictures like this, you'd ideally use flash.

- the sharpening you applied is too aggressive. Try to apply less sharpening or use a different radius (if you sharpen with unsharp mask).

It's a decent picture as it is; with the above two issues corrected (which may actually be possible if you have a correctly exposed RAW file), it would be really good.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: koraks]
    #18417983 - 06/14/13 11:19 AM (5 years, 10 months ago)

Quote:

Gravija said:
I would probably have a lot more input if I'd ever seen this species before in person. The picture is well lit. It seems homogeneously detailed, which is great for this type of picture. There seem to be three dominant shades of yellow, did you intend to highlight this variability? My only real complaint is that the binomial name isn't italicized:lol:



I call these "studio" shots. this is my second time attempting one but I don't like them as much as in-situ shots. they can show a lot more features you can't always compose in the field though. optimally I would have several constant lights from all angles set up but I just put these on a grey card and triggered my flash at different angles during the cam exposure. I meant to highlight stages of growth and color, especially the pinkish one. I've noticed some people think pinkish Mitrula = probable M. lunulatospora ID but micro for several of these different looking forms, all growing together, fit M. elegans

Quote:

suchen said:
I can't blow the photo up, so I will say that right now it is difficult in some areas to see the contrast between bright yellows and whites on the Mitrula. Yellow and white mushrooms are inordinately difficult to capture well. Perhaps try slightly darker exposure for slightly more contrast?



here's a slightly bigger one. http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7440/9030202912_9c28d47cc4_o.jpg
I tried to get you a 4000 x something pixel one but flickr kept timing out

Quote:

koraks said:
It's really quite well done and better than you'd usually get on the internet. If you're looking for points to improve your future work, here's some you can take into account:

- the yellows seem to be posterized; this usually is the result of either overexposure or digitally compressed dynamic range. You can try to expose a little bit shorter (e.g. -0.5 stop exposure compensation) and shoot in raw instead of jpeg (if you haven't done so). Another cause for posterized colors is the use of a badly balanced light source; regular light bulbs tend to posterize reds and yellows, while cfl's do the same thing to greens and yellows. The light of dusk or dawn may do the same thing, but less pronounced. For pictures like this, you'd ideally use flash.

- the sharpening you applied is too aggressive. Try to apply less sharpening or use a different radius (if you sharpen with unsharp mask).

It's a decent picture as it is; with the above two issues corrected (which may actually be possible if you have a correctly exposed RAW file), it would be really good.



what do you mean by too aggressive? harsh/unlike you would see in person? I used 0.5 pixel radius but probably too much strength on it. could posterized colors have resulted from my use of luminance too?

thanks a lot guys. I'll definitely look into your comments
also does anyone see a weird red cast over the picture? I didn't yesterday but today I do


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: The Thinker]
    #18418122 - 06/14/13 11:59 AM (5 years, 10 months ago)

Thinker, have you tried sharpening just the luminosity channel? I've had mixed results...


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Gravija]
    #18419313 - 06/14/13 05:18 PM (5 years, 10 months ago)

don't think so. do you use photoshop? would it be the setting in camera raw under the detail tab that says luminance detail? not sure I've ever messed with that slider but when I reduce luminance noise that setting automatically gets bumped up to 50/100 from 0/100


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: The Thinker]
    #18419768 - 06/14/13 07:06 PM (5 years, 10 months ago)

No, I use gimp. Sometimes I will duplicate my image, convert it from rgb to lab, sharpen the l channel, convert back and merge. Here's a cool article that has a couple of sharpening tips for shop-

http://www.tipsquirrel.com/luminosity-sharpening-3-ways/


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: The Thinker]
    #18420196 - 06/14/13 08:46 PM (5 years, 10 months ago)

Quote:

The Thinker said:
I tried to get you a 4000 x something pixel one but flickr kept timing out





:thumbup::thumbup:

The only reddish hue I see is in the sporocarp directly above the 10cm mark, but I think that is natural.

I believe what koraks is saying about posterization is the concept I was going for in my explanation about loss of contrast in the color areas. Shooting in RAW and perhaps mucking about with the highlights slider, the recovery slider, or a tiny touch to the exposure slider might help? Not sure if those exact sliders exist in Camera Raw as they do in Lightroom 3.


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The bulb is the bulb.

The volva is the volva.

They have a very long term realtionship, but they’re “just friends.”


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: The Thinker]
    #18422002 - 06/15/13 06:01 AM (5 years, 10 months ago)

Quote:

The Thinker said:
what do you mean by too aggressive? harsh/unlike you would see in person? I used 0.5 pixel radius but probably too much strength on it.



When resizing to ca. 20% of the original image size, I generally use a 0.3px radius and, say, 150% sharpening. I find that beyond this (either figure) tends to result in oversharpening as visible by the jagged edges and the granular look on the background in your image.

Quote:


could posterized colors have resulted from my use of luminance too?




I think the yellows are simply overexposed which could very well be the case if you did multiple zaps with the flash gun. I assume your camera can display RGB histograms? Watch those when making shots like these to see that you're not clipping any channels.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #18993914 - 10/18/13 03:43 AM (5 years, 6 months ago)

I need to build this (well, something functionally equivalent to this): http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:78071


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: canid]
    #18995348 - 10/18/13 02:15 PM (5 years, 6 months ago)

All that thing does is hold the phone in front of the eyepiece.  If you are used to doing it manually, it would be a nice thing to have.  If you are ever in san francisco or oakland, there are hacker spaces where you can go to use 3d printers for free. 

But its not really the best solution for microscope photos because the eyepiece converts the light into a form visible to your eye, then the lens in your camera phone converts it back again to the other form  before it hits the sensor.  The more lenses you have the more distortion you get, and also any speck of dust on any of the lenses will turn up in your photos as black spots.

A better solution is to couple the light coming to the eyepiece more directly to the ccd of a camera.  This can be done with a dslr microscope adaptor from microscopenet.com, or you could take apart an old camera (one with a broken zoom would be perfect) and use a couple lenses to focus the light directly on to the sensor. 

A 3d printer is a good thing to use to print the 23mm eyepiece adaptor and various parts you would need to hold it together, or you could take apart an old eyepiece and use a bunch of epoxy to make it all solid.



Regarding mushroom photography tips, I have been meaning to bump this thread to share a few things that I have learned recently.  These are for my canon 60d, other dslr's probably have equivelent features.

If taking a pic of a white mushroom, always turn on highlight tone priority.  This makes it so the colors of the mushroom don't get blown out so easily, and you can expose the whole frame more.  Without it if you turn down the exposure so much that the white mushroom is not blown out, the background and other stuff will be pretty dark.

If you are taking a picture of a dark mushroom, turn on the auto lighting optimizer to strong.  This does the exact opposite of highlight tone priority, and affects the shadows.  You'll get more detail in the shadows.

Always use reflectors to bounce a little but of light back up into the upper gills and stem of the mushroom.  Don't bounce too much light though, or your photos will end up looking like Taylor Lockwoods.

Here is the reflector I use.  It is cheap and awesome, and you can use the white diffuser on the inside if your mushrooms happen to be in direct sunlight.  Much better than carrying around a white umbrella.    Get 2 of them.  I got mine cheaper on ebay. Always bring some pretty girl(s) along to hold your reflectors, otherwise you will find that you often need either an easel or 4 hands to get your shot right.  http://www.amazon.co.uk/Ex-Pro-Photographic-Light-Reflector-Collapsible/dp/B000RGPUKM

If you don't feel like setting up a reflector or did not bring anything with a light color, you can use the flash, but turn it down a whole lot to around -2 or -3 so you don't get harsh shadows.    If you must use the flash at full power, turn the camera on its side or upside down so the gills and upper stem aren't in a harsh shadow.

Always use the largest aperture you can to get all of the mushroom(s) in focus for best clarity.  It is best to error on the side of an aperture too small, because the diffraction blur is much less bad than the blur caused by having part of the mushroom out of focus.  If you are going to have part of the mushroom out of focus, make sure it is the part furthest away from the camera.  If you use a tripod and dslr you can precisely determine how small of an aperture you need.  Some people use the DOF preview button for this, but a better way is just to take a picture and then look at it closely.  Make sure you adjust the focus perfectly in the middle of the depth of field that you want, then close the aperture until everything in your subject is in focus.  You can also hold down the DOF preview button and with the other hand change the aperture, preferably in live view mode while zoomed in to either the front mushroom or the back mushrom.  Still I have better luck just taking a picture and then adjusting a few things and take another and another until the shot is perfect.  Then delete all the first ones and keep just the perfect one.

That is one reason a tripod is important - not only does it eliminate motion blur, it also keeps the camera in exactly the same place so you can precisely set the depth of field.  If you hand hold the camera, it will be moving back and fourth between shots and you will need to shoot with a smaller aperture to make up for this impreciseness.  When I handhold I always overestimate the f-stop on purpose to give me a bit of wiggle room, and usually flash the mushroom to make up for the lack of light due to a small aperture.

One last thing, if you have a dslr and you use flash, get a ring flash!  They are awesome for macro shots and not so awesome for mushrooms that are more than 8 feet away or so.  I use the $100 ring flash from ebay and amazon, the phoenix smartflash 46c or something.  It has cheap construction but works great, and I have been carrying it in my backpack for 4 months and it has not broken.  Any electronics that can withstand that kind of abuse has my respect.

One last tip, when doing taxonomic shots don't forget to cut one of the mushrooms in half to show the context, and after you are done taking the shots, take one more with potassium hydroxide on the gills, stem, cap and context.  Since you can't do koh reactions with dried material, you'll be glad you spent the extra 30 seconds to do this later when you try to id your mushroom.

Finally, save your mushrooms in a paper bag and write the photo number that the camera assigns the picture on the bag.  That way you will not have to wonder which dried collection goes with which photo.  Also write anything that is not obvious from the photos on the bag, such as the nearby trees, odor, taste, cap texture, elevation, gps coordinates and perhaps the range of physical dimensions of the mushrooms in the collection.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #18995930 - 10/18/13 04:35 PM (5 years, 6 months ago)

All that Highlight Tone Priority does is underexpose your image by slowing the ISO and then digitally lifting the darkest spots during processing. That's why the lowest you can set your ISO to is 200 when you have HTP set to on. I think it is better to shoot in raw and underexpose the image, if I must, and fix it in post. HTP and ALO are only really useful if you shoot in jpg and don't plan on any post production.

Personally, I have no problem carrying a white diffusion umbrella around. I have a loop of fabric on my shoulder bag that I sheathe it in when I'm not using it and I just stake it in the ground or log when I need to soften the highlights. I'm on my second $5 umbrella, I think I'll spend ten on my next one. They probably wouldn't break if I stopped using them to carry big mushrooms that won't fit in my tackle boxes.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Gravija]
    #18996046 - 10/18/13 05:04 PM (5 years, 6 months ago)

But since I don‘t own a computer and don't plan on post processing, htp is a good idea for white mushrooms, right? 

I did like my white umbrella, and good point about being able to stake it.  Mine was shredded to the point where people would laugh at me when I used it.    I plan to get another, but they are super hard to find in Mexico.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #18996089 - 10/18/13 05:15 PM (5 years, 6 months ago)

Yes, both of those features are especially useful to someone in your position. I want hot Mexican chicks to hold my reflector.


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #18996640 - 10/18/13 07:43 PM (5 years, 6 months ago)

3d printers are great, and I want one, but I've got a milling machine.

[edit: woops, wrong thread]


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Attn PWN hunters: If you should come across a bluing Psilocybe matching P. pellicolusa please smell it.
If you detect a scent reminiscent of Anethole (anise) please preserve a specimen or two for study and please PM me.


Edited by canid (10/29/13 07:45 AM)


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: canid]
    #19064766 - 10/31/13 07:27 PM (5 years, 6 months ago)

the iPhone app "camera plus" has a decent macro capability and currently costs $0.99


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: happyfunguy]
    #20049555 - 05/28/14 02:25 AM (4 years, 11 months ago)



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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Alan Rockefeller]
    #21424463 - 03/17/15 11:31 PM (4 years, 2 months ago)



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Invisibleo8u
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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: lusk217]
    #21424522 - 03/17/15 11:42 PM (4 years, 2 months ago)

It's a non-active coprinoid. Compare to Coprinellus micaceus. For ID requests, you'll want to create a new thread. This one is for photography discussion, not mushroom identification.


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OfflineTamedher
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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: o8u]
    #21535478 - 04/12/15 01:58 AM (4 years, 1 month ago)

Thanks im new to this , please help!! how do i post an ID forum ??


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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Tamedher]
    #21535606 - 04/12/15 02:57 AM (4 years, 1 month ago)



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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: o8u]
    #22178488 - 09/02/15 04:50 PM (3 years, 8 months ago)

Hello,
I'm looking some advise on buying a camera for photographing mushrooms.

I am considering buying a Nikon D5200 DSLR camera. I should point out that I am very much an amateur photographer, and I only have experience with ordinary digital point and shoot cameras, so this is a new venture for me.

I have found an offer on a website for one complete with an 18-55mm VR lens kit for £279.99 which seems like a good deal considering my local catalogue shop sells the same package for £399.

Or, I could just buy the camera, body only, for £221.99 and buy a lens separately. However, I don't know anything about lenses so I need advise on one to buy. I am thinking maybe the Nikon 35mm f1.8G AF-S DX wide aperture lens which is available for £116.99, which they say is suitable in low-light conditions. Would this be a good deal, or should I consider something else?


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How to add a picture to a post


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Offlineyrninja
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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Duggstar]
    #22182953 - 09/03/15 02:53 PM (3 years, 8 months ago)

great advice on mush photography, thanks


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OfflineAlan RockefellerM
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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Duggstar]
    #22183652 - 09/03/15 06:03 PM (3 years, 8 months ago)

Quote:

Duggstar said:


I am considering buying a Nikon D5200 DSLR camera.





Excellent choice of camera body.  The flip out screen is great for mushrooms.

For a lens for mushrooms, get a Nikon 60 mm micro lens.  For people / other things, the kit lens you linked above is ok.  Not great, but it works.  Maybe just get the body and the 60mm lens, and get more lenses later if you decide that you need them.

Also get a tripod, manfrotto is a good brand but there are many others.  I have one like this, and also a ball head:  http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/733656-REG/Vanguard_ALTA_PRO_264AT_Alta_Pro_264AT_4_Section.html



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Invisiblekoraks
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Re: Mushroom Photography Tips [Re: Duggstar]
    #22186785 - 09/04/15 10:07 AM (3 years, 8 months ago)

If you're on a budget, get a body and an 18-55 kit lens. It'll be usable for general purpose photography and to some extent for mushrooms as well (provided they're not too tiny). If you have more cash, the 60mm Nikkor is a really nice lens and also well-suited for portraits, but not of much use for general purpose photography as you'll find yourself wanting for more wide-angle. If you're on a tight budget but you do want to be able to focus a little closer, consider buying the kit lens plus a set of extension tubes (3rd-party ones with digital contacts are a good choice) or alternatively a close-up filter, although the extension tubes will provide better image quality.

In terms of bang for the buck (and provided you want a new camera and don't want to pursue the second hand option), a new entry-level body + kit lens is impossible to beat.

An alternative to the 60mm macro lens would be a 50/1.8 (non-macro) lens with a macro 'filter'/screw on lens or a set of extension tubes to aid in close-range focusing. It's a bit less costly than the real macro lens (and of course a bit more of a compromise), but capable of excellent images.

If you go for the 18-55VR kit lens, you may get away shooting mushroom macros handheld at higher ISO's (but with higher noise levels, obviously). If you opt for the 60mm nikkor or the 50/1.8, you'll need a tripod. For the possible best results, a tripod is required in any scenario. Look for a tripod that allows you to position the camera as close to the ground as possible. Some cheaper tripods don't allow the legs to be spread out to almost horizontal position; avoid these as they're virtually useless for mushroom photography.


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