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InvisibleCureCat
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Re: Psilocybe Cyanofriscosa [Re: auweia]
    #6339291 - 12/06/06 03:00 AM (14 years, 10 months ago)

Mhmm... but you've seen the P.E. strain??? Well, it is a selectively bred strain, which cannot multiply in outdoor conditions, due to it's propensity for sterility. However, that is a good example, that HUGE variation can be achieved, and chance may not favour the emergence of an unlikely strain, however, coincidence does occur, and can spread, if against the odds, circumstance supports it.


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Invisiblemjshroomer
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Re: Psilocybe Cyanofriscosa [Re: CureCat]
    #6339539 - 12/06/06 07:07 AM (14 years, 10 months ago)

In 1983, A large collection of P. cyanofribrilosa and P. cyanescens were collected along I-5 Highwaty between Eureka=Arcada, Ca. I mean over a 100 pound collections was found growing alongside of I-5 on both sides of the highway in alder mulch and stems and twigs and broken branches.

But agioan if it is new it will be posted by Guzman or others eventually. With all of these years this mushrooms has been collected and many on deposit, why would someone not take care of it. It takes 2-6 years now for papers to be published in some journals and 6 months in others..

My new paper on Pegleriana form SE Asia is just being submitted. and is only a few pages.

However my large 100 paper of 2002 with Guzman and Gartz took three and a half years after submission to appear.

mj Besides being 900 miles from the PNW tp Frisco, remember there are cyans there and ther have been found some stuntzii's and P. fimetaria inthe same region and some reports of liberty caps at times or a similar macroscopice species, also common in the PNW/

mj


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Re: Psilocybe Cyanofriscosa [Re: mjshroomer]
    #6339786 - 12/06/06 11:00 AM (14 years, 10 months ago)

mj, I've heard this mistake got famous from people, so you should know if nobody told you. I-5 doesn't run through Eureka, it's hwy 101. I-5 is 100 miles east in Yreka to Medford.

Also, Eureka is more PNW habitat than it is in the Bay Area. For example, liberty caps grow in Eureka, but not down here. It rains twice as much in Eureka than in SF. Cyans grow down here, and Eureka and PNW tho. But Eureka is still 400 miles away from here

also, I read a reference about fibrillosa having hairs at the base of the stipe somewhere. Never seen that. btw, 1980 was the year of discovery, yes?...referenced in the Azurescens paper posted here > http://www.shroomery.org/forums/showflat.php/Cat/0/Number/6339539/Main/6320418#Post6339539

you know what's really weird about this, Stamets is saying that azures closely resemble cyanofibrillosa but that azures get alot bigger than fibs. But I bet these fibs down here get alot bigger than azurescens.

trippy, no?


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Re: Psilocybe Cyanofriscosa [Re: auweia]
    #6342691 - 12/07/06 12:30 AM (14 years, 10 months ago)

no disrespect but wtf does guzman have to do with anything??? Why do people get all excite4d whne his name is brought up and what has he done lately


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Re: Psilocybe Cyanofriscosa [Re: tahoe]
    #6342791 - 12/07/06 12:57 AM (14 years, 10 months ago)

Quote:

tahoe said:
no disrespect but wtf does guzman have to do with anything??? Why do people get all excite4d whne his name is brought up and what has he done lately




He is the leading expert on the genus Psilocybe.

http://www.stainblue.com/guzman.htm


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Re: Psilocybe Cyanofriscosa [Re: CureCat]
    #6342834 - 12/07/06 01:12 AM (14 years, 10 months ago)

well i saw 2 different species at the fair that were macroscopicaly different. One was called ps fib and the other was the supposedly the cyclone/friscosaa species. Now the thing that we are calling friscosas and the thing this guy was calling a fib were the same thing. Now this so called friscosa looked different then what we have been calling friscosas. Last yewar at the fqair i was tolds that this new species had been sent out to guzman and he said it was closer to a cyan then a fib but wasnt either. Now this mushroom that this guy said was a friscosa looked more like auweias richmond find. And acording to the pics of the real fibs up north our real fibs or what ever they are look nothing like them. Last year at the fair 2 people said that they were the first to find the new species by the ocean, one claiming to find it the year before and the other claiming to find it last year. This year at the fair someone else said that they found the first fib 5 years ago. Its just all to confusing and i would like to see some pics of this other species that i saw over this weekend.

I believe peter knows this guy james that showed me both mushrooms but i dont know if he agrees that they are differnt. If he does then the pics of what we all are posting as friscosas are not the friscosa/cyclone but rather the fib. I have a cloned fib or what we have been calling friscosa on agar right now and it isnt showing signs of spiraling. its only about the size of a quarter so i wont know for sure until it gets bigger. here it is


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Re: Psilocybe Cyanofriscosa [Re: tahoe]
    #6343092 - 12/07/06 02:39 AM (14 years, 10 months ago)

I wonder if the cyclone effect is consistent with the Bay Area Psilocybe shown in Paul Stamets book, or if it is it appears sporadically... I suspect it is incidental, but I am not sure.


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Re: Psilocybe Cyanofriscosa [Re: CureCat]
    #6343244 - 12/07/06 04:16 AM (14 years, 10 months ago)

Quote:

CureCat said:
I wonder if the cyclone effect is consistent with the Bay Area Psilocybe shown in Paul Stamets book, or if it is it appears sporadically... I suspect it is incidental, but I am not sure.




very good question!


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Re: Psilocybe Cyanofriscosa [Re: sui]
    #6343464 - 12/07/06 07:59 AM (14 years, 10 months ago)

that's weird, cause the cyclone type here that stamets printed in his book looks like the friscosas here we've been posting, not the Richmond find..Waylit even scanned photos of that here > http://forums.mycotopia.net/showthread.php?t=16394

that's the one that's common here now that the Fair is calling Fibs?

Tahoe > Now the thing that we are calling friscosas and the thing this guy was calling a fib were the same thing. Now this so called friscosa looked different then what we have been calling friscosas.

and Stamets never noticed this discrepency at the fair?


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Invisiblemjshroomer
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Re: Psilocybe Cyanofriscosa [Re: tahoe]
    #6343640 - 12/07/06 10:13 AM (14 years, 10 months ago)

Tahoe, this is who Dr. Gaston Guzman is!

Quote:


Dr. Gaston Guzman -- mycologist, taxonomist, explorer, author and anthropologist -- is the world's foremost authority on the genus Psilocybe, having discovered and authored more than half of the known neurotropic species. He also is a leading authority on the indigenous peoples of Mexico, and their divinatory and medicinal uses of the sacred mushrooms.

Dr. Guzman was born in Xalapa, Veracruz, in 1932. His interest in mycology began in 1955 while a graduate student at the National Polytechnic Institute, in Mexico City. Up to that point the Institute's collection of fungi had been poorly maintained and he resolved to begin cataloging an entire new collection of specimens. In the summer of that year, Dr. Guzman conducted his first field work in the forests near Mexico City, where he found myriad species about which little was known. This inspired him to declare mushrooms as the topic of his professional thesis and he vowed to someday write a book on Mexican mushrooms.

In 1957, Dr. Guzman was invited on an expedition -- led by noted mycologist Dr. Rolf Singer -- to study neurotropic mushrooms in the Huautla de Jimenez region. Dr. Guzman was already familiar with the region, having collected there in 1953 (while in the employ of Syntex Laboratories) medicinal plant specimens belonging to the Dioscorea genus. Dr. Guzman had read with enthusiasm R. Gordon Wasson's Life article published in 1957 and he was delighted to have the opportunity to return to the Huautla region to study the hongos mágico. On the last day of the expedition, Dr. Singer and Guzman met Wasson in a small village near Huautla; Wasson was in the region conducting research and it was from this chance meeting that he and Dr. Guzman formed a close friendship that would last nearly thirty years. This meeting also resulted in Dr. Guzman's later friendship with Wasson's colleagues Roger Heim and Richard Evans Schultes.

In 1958, through his Indian contacts, Dr. Guzman learned of the Aztec word teotlaquilnanacatl. This word is used by the Indians of the Sierra de Puebla region to describe the sacred mushrooms; translated it means "the mushrooms that paint" (referring to the mushrooms' visionary properties). This is noteworthy because the Spanish chronicler Bernardino de Sahagun in 1555 stated that the Aztec name for the sacred mushrooms was teonanacatl. However, it seems that the word teonanacatl is no longer used by the Indians [Guzman, letter to author 1999]. Also in 1958, Dr. Guzman published his first paper on a blue-staining Psilocybe species and the first paper on the ecology of neurotropic fungi. This work was followed by other papers in which he revised the known hallucinogenic species of Mexico and described new habitats and species. The professional thesis of Dr. Guzman, presented in 1959, fulfilled the requirements for a degree in biology. The subject of the thesis was a study of the known neurotropic fungi of Mexico, their taxonomy, cultural uses, ecology and distribution. The thesis was reviewed by a professional jury and Dr. Guzman was awarded an honorary distinction. Dr. Guzman dedicated his thesis to his teacher Rolf Singer, as well as to Wasson, Heim and Teofilo Herrera, who all aided him in conducting his research.

In 1979, Dr. Guzman, along with Stephen H. Pollock, described a new entheogenic mushroom found by them in the Naolinco region of the State of Veracruz. This species was named Psilocybe wassoniorum in honor of Wasson and his wife Valentina.

Dr. Guzman's masterpiece, a world monograph titled The Genus Psilocybe: A Systematic Revision of the Known Species Including the History, Distribution and Chemistry of the Hallucinogenic Species, which he began in 1957, was published in 1983 by J. Cramer of Vaduz, Germany. This definitive work was made possible through a grant Dr. Guzman received from The Guggenheim Memorial Foundation of New York, on the recommendation of Richard Evans Schultes.

In 1993, Dr. Guzman, together with mycologists Victor M. Bandala and John W. Allen, described a new neurotropic mushroom, Psilocybe samuiensis, from Koh Samui, Thailand. This is the first blue-staining mushroom reported from Thailand and is the first species of the Section Mexicana to be reported from outside the Americas. Also described by Dr. Guzman were several new bluing species from Australasia: Psilocybe australiana, Psilocybe eucalypta, Psilocybe tasmaniana and Psilocybe aucklandii (the first three in collaboration with the preeminent Scottish mycologist Dr. Roy Watling, the last with Chris King of New Zealand). From South America, Dr. Guzman described more than ten neurotropic species including Psilocybe brasiliensis, Psilocybe columbiana, Psilocybe meridiensis, Psilocybe antioquiensis and others. From the U.S.A., Dr. Guzman described Psilocybe stuntzii from Washington (in collaboration with Jonathan Ott); Psilocybe tampanensis from Florida (in collaboration with Stephen Pollock); and Psilocybe weilii from Georgia (in collaboration with Fidel Tapia and mycologist Paul Stamets). Currently, Dr. Guzman has several papers in press, describing new species from Mexico, U.S.A., and Spain, as well as a checklist of all the known Psilocybe species in Europe. Also in progress (published) is a book on the worldwide distribution of the neurotropic fungi, in collaboration with John W. Allen and Jochen Gartz.

In his "Supplement to the monograph of the genus Psilocybe," published in 1995 by J. Cramer, Berlin (and dedicated to Professor Meinhard Moser), Dr. Guzman revised all the species described after his world monograph, and also described several new species and updated the keys for identification of the sections and species.




Currently he is revising his book. THe original book was $100.00 new so this time around it will be quite more.

I expect a copy for my work with Guzman. We still have some species which may or may not make the new book.

Next month he will began work on Shroomey Dan's Ohiop mushrooms for which Iposted some sem images.

Here is the title cover from his 1st Edition of the genus Psilocybe.

He has also published other books, all in Spanish of Mexican toxic, edibles and poisonous shrooms of the forests and mountains of Mexico.



mj


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Invisiblemjshroomer
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Re: Psilocybe Cyanofriscosa [Re: auweia]
    #6343688 - 12/07/06 10:31 AM (14 years, 10 months ago)

Auweia said
Quote:


you know what's really weird about this, Stamets is saying that azures closely resemble cyanofibrillosa but that azures get alot bigger than fibs. But I bet these fibs down here get alot bigger than azurescens.




Paul spends 99999.99999% of his time in his lab and at his farm, He rarely gets out for urban shroom hunting. Of course he has his chantrelle and matsutake spots so he goes there, but he does not walk around neighborhoods or local parks looking for new species of Psilocybe. So he is more or less a lab rat enthusiast.

HE is also very busy and rarely has time to talk to outsiders from his farm or to peoeple he has known for years. However, when attending a local mycological Society meeting or a conference he will discuss most things with strangers. But never from his farm.

I have a letter form Paul in 1990 asking me if I had heard of Panaeolus azurescens. I had no idea what he was talking about. WE in Oregon and Washington always referred to them as Psilocybe astoriensis. That was the name I was going to give it with Gartz.

In that very year I took Gartz, brought him from Germany to America for the first time since the wall came down, he had never been outsid eof Leipzig, Germany until we went shrooming together for three weeks. I was paid quite a bit of funds from the German Scientific Foundation. I took him hunting in Washingtron, Portland, AStoria/Hammond, Florence, Eugene and finally to Salem and Lake Detroit, Oregon.

Prior to that, Steven Peele of the Florida Mycology Research Center called them Astoria Ossip. He had no idea what they were.

But then when I took Gartz to meet Paul and to borrow a slide projector for our lectures at Breittenbush, He and Paul wrote the paper behind my back and published the mushroom as Psilocybe azuresecens. Also azure is the name of one of Paul's sons. One of my three childrens name is Teona (short for Teonanacatl).

The definite umbo or protrude on the cap of azurescens resembles a sombrero of sorts so it can easily be distinguished from the wavy caps of P. cyanecens, although some azures can become wavy in age as do some cubes.

Thus is the way of some mycologists.

I caught gartz selling postcards of my photos in Europe without informing me he was making money off of my loaned photos. He credited the package with five images by me but there were 11 of my images inthe cards. If I had not gone to Amsterdam and saw them for sale in shops inthe city I would never have known he was doing that

I also caught him selling European versions my CD's which he was a partial co-author of with his name as first author and me as co-author on the European editions of the book.

So much for that.

But Paul rarely goes shrooming/.

btw. The azures and cyanofibrilosa were first brought to the publics attention by me and a friend at a Breittenbush annual shroom show in the early 1980s.

mj


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Re: Psilocybe Cyanofriscosa [Re: mjshroomer]
    #6343978 - 12/07/06 12:04 PM (14 years, 10 months ago)

Quote:

CureCat said:
Quote:

tahoe said:
no disrespect but wtf does guzman have to do with anything??? Why do people get all excite4d whne his name is brought up and what has he done lately




He is the leading expert on the genus Psilocybe.

http://www.stainblue.com/guzman.htm




Quote:

mjshroomer said:
Tahoe, this is who Dr. Gaston Guzman is!

Quote:


Dr. Gaston Guzman -- mycologist, taxonomist, explorer, author and anthropologist -- is the world's foremost authority on the genus Psilocybe, having discovered and authored more than half of the known neurotropic species. He also is a leading authority on the indigenous peoples of Mexico, and their divinatory and medicinal uses of the sacred mushrooms.

Dr. Guzman was born in Xalapa, Veracruz, in 1932. His interest in mycology began in 1955 while a graduate student at the National Polytechnic Institute, in Mexico City. Up to that point the Institute's collection of fungi had been poorly maintained and he resolved to begin cataloging an entire new collection of specimens. In the summer of that year, Dr. Guzman conducted his first field work in the forests near Mexico City, where he found myriad species about which little was known. This inspired him to declare mushrooms as the topic of his professional thesis and he vowed to someday write a book on Mexican mushrooms.

In 1957, Dr. Guzman was invited on an expedition -- led by noted mycologist Dr. Rolf Singer -- to study neurotropic mushrooms in the Huautla de Jimenez region. Dr. Guzman was already familiar with the region, having collected there in 1953 (while in the employ of Syntex Laboratories) medicinal plant specimens belonging to the Dioscorea genus. Dr. Guzman had read with enthusiasm R. Gordon Wasson's Life article published in 1957 and he was delighted to have the opportunity to return to the Huautla region to study the hongos mágico. On the last day of the expedition, Dr. Singer and Guzman met Wasson in a small village near Huautla; Wasson was in the region conducting research and it was from this chance meeting that he and Dr. Guzman formed a close friendship that would last nearly thirty years. This meeting also resulted in Dr. Guzman's later friendship with Wasson's colleagues Roger Heim and Richard Evans Schultes.

In 1958, through his Indian contacts, Dr. Guzman learned of the Aztec word teotlaquilnanacatl. This word is used by the Indians of the Sierra de Puebla region to describe the sacred mushrooms; translated it means "the mushrooms that paint" (referring to the mushrooms' visionary properties). This is noteworthy because the Spanish chronicler Bernardino de Sahagun in 1555 stated that the Aztec name for the sacred mushrooms was teonanacatl. However, it seems that the word teonanacatl is no longer used by the Indians [Guzman, letter to author 1999]. Also in 1958, Dr. Guzman published his first paper on a blue-staining Psilocybe species and the first paper on the ecology of neurotropic fungi. This work was followed by other papers in which he revised the known hallucinogenic species of Mexico and described new habitats and species. The professional thesis of Dr. Guzman, presented in 1959, fulfilled the requirements for a degree in biology. The subject of the thesis was a study of the known neurotropic fungi of Mexico, their taxonomy, cultural uses, ecology and distribution. The thesis was reviewed by a professional jury and Dr. Guzman was awarded an honorary distinction. Dr. Guzman dedicated his thesis to his teacher Rolf Singer, as well as to Wasson, Heim and Teofilo Herrera, who all aided him in conducting his research.

In 1979, Dr. Guzman, along with Stephen H. Pollock, described a new entheogenic mushroom found by them in the Naolinco region of the State of Veracruz. This species was named Psilocybe wassoniorum in honor of Wasson and his wife Valentina.

Dr. Guzman's masterpiece, a world monograph titled The Genus Psilocybe: A Systematic Revision of the Known Species Including the History, Distribution and Chemistry of the Hallucinogenic Species, which he began in 1957, was published in 1983 by J. Cramer of Vaduz, Germany. This definitive work was made possible through a grant Dr. Guzman received from The Guggenheim Memorial Foundation of New York, on the recommendation of Richard Evans Schultes.

In 1993, Dr. Guzman, together with mycologists Victor M. Bandala and John W. Allen, described a new neurotropic mushroom, Psilocybe samuiensis, from Koh Samui, Thailand. This is the first blue-staining mushroom reported from Thailand and is the first species of the Section Mexicana to be reported from outside the Americas. Also described by Dr. Guzman were several new bluing species from Australasia: Psilocybe australiana, Psilocybe eucalypta, Psilocybe tasmaniana and Psilocybe aucklandii (the first three in collaboration with the preeminent Scottish mycologist Dr. Roy Watling, the last with Chris King of New Zealand). From South America, Dr. Guzman described more than ten neurotropic species including Psilocybe brasiliensis, Psilocybe columbiana, Psilocybe meridiensis, Psilocybe antioquiensis and others. From the U.S.A., Dr. Guzman described Psilocybe stuntzii from Washington (in collaboration with Jonathan Ott); Psilocybe tampanensis from Florida (in collaboration with Stephen Pollock); and Psilocybe weilii from Georgia (in collaboration with Fidel Tapia and mycologist Paul Stamets). Currently, Dr. Guzman has several papers in press, describing new species from Mexico, U.S.A., and Spain, as well as a checklist of all the known Psilocybe species in Europe. Also in progress (published) is a book on the worldwide distribution of the neurotropic fungi, in collaboration with John W. Allen and Jochen Gartz.

In his "Supplement to the monograph of the genus Psilocybe," published in 1995 by J. Cramer, Berlin (and dedicated to Professor Meinhard Moser), Dr. Guzman revised all the species described after his world monograph, and also described several new species and updated the keys for identification of the sections and species.








That is SO totally what I linked to! Rrgh!!


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InvisibleCureCat
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Re: Psilocybe Cyanofriscosa [Re: mjshroomer]
    #6343982 - 12/07/06 12:08 PM (14 years, 10 months ago)

Quote:

mjshroomer said:
But then when I took Gartz to meet Paul and to borrow a slide projector for our lectures at Breittenbush, He and Paul wrote the paper behind my back and published the mushroom as Psilocybe azuresecens.

I caught gartz selling postcards of my photos in Europe without informing me he was making money off of my loaned photos.  He credited the package with five images by me but there were 11 of my images inthe cards. If I had not gone to Amsterdam and saw them for sale in shops inthe city I would never have known he was doing that

I also caught him selling European versions my CD's which he was a partial co-author of with his name as first author and me as co-author on the European editions of the book.

So much for that.





This Gartz fellow sounds like a total dick wad!!! :shake:


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Re: Psilocybe Cyanofriscosa [Re: CureCat]
    #6344191 - 12/07/06 01:26 PM (14 years, 10 months ago)

Quote:

CureCat said:
I wonder if the cyclone effect is consistent with the Bay Area Psilocybe shown in Paul Stamets book, or if it is it appears sporadically... I suspect it is incidental, but I am not sure.




I've put various fibs/friscosas on agar, none of them demonstrated the spiraling effect. These were done multispore, I suspect paul found a substrain thru isolation which he called the cyclone psilocybe.


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Re: Psilocybe Cyanofriscosa [Re: WaylitJim]
    #6344203 - 12/07/06 01:30 PM (14 years, 10 months ago)

Yeah, that was my guess...


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Re: Psilocybe Cyanofriscosa [Re: mjshroomer]
    #6344221 - 12/07/06 01:34 PM (14 years, 10 months ago)

Yeah, I heard that before the Stamets doesn't go shrooming much anymore, which is why I think Peter Werner is doing collections around here now. I know he goes out and looks, and I bet those others at the fair do too. Ironically, they're both connected to the same MSSF and now there seems to be a disconnect even there.

Ok so at the fair they're saying this is the cyclone

and these are the fibs


The top one is what Tahoe thought were Azures, and I wasn't sure, I just know I never saw those before, and they're strong. Peter just posted and said they are NOT azures, and not part of the cyanescens complex, but might be stuntzii or subaeruginosa. I just think they're too strong to be stuntzii, tho they do have a veil remnant on the stem. Not a ring like stuntzii, just a faint remnant of one > http://www.shroomery.org/forums/showflat.php/Number/6322247#Post6322247

The bottom one is what most people call the cyclone one, and is in Mycelium Running, and is the common one now. But Peter is sayng these are closer to cyanescens than to fibrillosa, and I think he said Guzman thinks that too > http://www.shroomery.org/forums/showflat.php/Number/6322343#Post6322343

As far as the top one, all I can say is I checked the transplants I did last year, and all of them look very healthy (the mycelium)..They just haven't popped yet, so maybe soon.

Pretty soon I hope we're going to get more and better photos. Sorry to hear about some of this stuff with Stamets and Gartz, etc, MJ...I've heard this before with other people too. There's one guy here who's a commercial grower, knew Stamets for 20 years or so, and they haven't talked in awhile.

You know what I think?..I think a place like this will eventually become much more valuable than any of the periodic books that come out, for no other reason that it appears the changes are happening too rapidly for the books now, at least here. And at least here people can post tons of photos, rather than one or two that's been posted up until now. No such thing as too many photos, and that's never going to be worse than too few photos.

Even better, there's instantaneous peer review. What can takes years in book form takes minutes here. I'll bet those folks at the MSSF have a putie and are online. Peter's the only one I've seen here willing to post.

Other than here, there's the one display at the fair, one photo in Mycelium Running, a couple photos online, and that's it. A real dearth of info, except for here....and one other forum so far


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InvisibleCureCat
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Re: Psilocybe Cyanofriscosa [Re: auweia]
    #6344299 - 12/07/06 01:55 PM (14 years, 10 months ago)

Quote:

auweia said:
You know what I think?..I think a place like this will eventually become much more valuable than any of the periodic books that come out, for no other reason that it appears the changes are happening too rapidly for the books now, at least here. And at least here people can post tons of photos, rather than one or two that's been posted up until now. No such thing as too many photos, and that's never going to be worse than too few photos.

Even better, there's instantaneous peer review. What can takes years in book form takes minutes here. I'll bet those folks at the MSSF have a putie and are online. Peter's the only one I've seen here willing to post.





I agree completely, however, I give those reasons as why I find the internet as a whole, so valuable.

People at the fair kept asking me where I learned what I know, and seemed astonished when I told them that everything I know is from the internet and personal experience.
I keep in mind, however, that many of the folks at the fair are older, and not savvy with the internet.

I tell them that the internet is a great resource, because the information available is not limited, and that it can be corrected and updated in a blink of an eye, rather than taking years for some books to publish new editions.


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Invisiblemjshroomer
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Re: Psilocybe Cyanofriscosa [Re: CureCat]
    #6344519 - 12/07/06 02:55 PM (14 years, 10 months ago)

Yes Cure Cat,

The mj shroom world site has over 5,000 photos of 55 species of psilocybian mushroms. The largest collection ont he internet.

However, there are still people her ewith five to 100 post giving advice to newbies to eat something they do not know what the mushroom is or they say things like, That looks like a stuntzii?

Oh well.

I am now back to work and off this subject for a while.

I am still revising the Bibliography of entheogenic mushrooms. Since 2002 publication I have now added more than 700 new refferences to the book. Most with annotations. and more than 756 photographs, plus a possible 2000 new additional images in a seprate gallery inthe book.

Plus Cactu's paper on his Jalisco mushrooms,
Shroomy Dan's on his Ohio species, a paper on P. pegleriana in press with guzman, and the alrge 130 page paper on SOutheast Asian actives. plus oneon the samuiensis and still i need to do more SEM work this spring to finish them off.In October of next year I retire form shrooms and will go live on a tropical shroom island with my favorite Quai arena.


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Invisibleauweia
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Re: Psilocybe Cyanofriscosa [Re: mjshroomer]
    #6344632 - 12/07/06 03:34 PM (14 years, 10 months ago)

Quote:

mjshroomer said:
Yes Cure Cat,

The mj shroom world site has over 5,000 photos of 55 species of psilocybian mushroms. The largest collection ont he internet.




yeah, just not much regarding these mystery mushrooms in the Bay Area..people travel the globe to the far corners of the world and get and document the tiniest most obscure psilocybes that most people will never see, but they can't make it here to a major metro area and document something that grows like weeds in places...go figure

I hope you're not saying I'm telling newbies to eat these, because I've said numerous times that both of these new species are not good for newbies and to stick with cyans. In fact, by insisting these are cyanofibrillosa is saying that these ARE well defined and IS recommending them to newbies

poor little mongrel mushroom.....the Rodney Dangerfield of the psilocybe world


Edited by auweia (12/07/06 04:20 PM)


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InvisibleWaylitJim
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Re: Psilocybe Cyanofriscosa [Re: auweia]
    #6344772 - 12/07/06 04:29 PM (14 years, 10 months ago)

Quote:

auweia said:
Ok so at the fair they're saying this is the cyclone...





I took some specimens from my Friscosa patch to the fair. Everyone I talked to ID'd them as Fibs, except this fellow 'James' who called them cyclones. It was nice to meet Peter Werner, he had some cyans with him and we talked for awhile. Auweia, peter told me the species you found might be P. subaeruginascens, not subaeruginosa. They're often confused.


Edited by WaylitJim (12/07/06 04:37 PM)


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