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Offlinebluhoney
Yes Im a realgirl ,geeesh
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Registered: 05/24/99
Posts: 936
Last seen: 9 years, 9 months
Complete Professional Growing Tek * 1
    #568037 - 03/02/02 10:44 PM (14 years, 9 months ago)

This is a professional outline of how industrial growing takes place. I thought some of you could get a few pointers to use on what ever scale your friends are growing:)bluhoney
Mushroom farming consists of six steps, and although the divisions are somewhat arbitrary, these steps identify what is needed to form a production system.

The six steps are Phase I composting, Phase II composting, spawning, casing, pinning, and cropping. These steps are described in their naturally occurring sequence, emphasizing the salient features within each step. Compost provides nutrients needed for mushrooms to grow. Two types of material are generally used for mushroom compost, the most used and least expensive being wheat straw-bedded horse manure. Synthetic compost is usually made from hay and crushed corncobs, although the term often refers to any mushroom compost where the prime ingredient is not horse manure. Both types of compost require the addition of nitrogen supplements and a conditioning agent, gypsum.

The preparation of compost occurs in two steps referred to as Phase I and Phase II composting. The discussion of compost preparation and mushroom production begins with Phase I composting.

1. Phase I: Making Mushroom Compost

This phase of compost preparation usually occurs outdoors although an enclosed building or a structure with a roof over it may be used. A concrete slab, referred to as a wharf, is required for composting. In addition, a compost turner to aerate and water the ingredients, and a tractor-loader to move the ingredients to the turner is needed. In earlier days piles were turned by hand using pitchforks, which is still an alternative to mechanized equipment, but it is labor intensive and physically demanding.

Phase I composting is initiated by mixing and wetting the ingredients as they are stacked in a rectangular pile with tight sides and a loose center. Normally, the bulk ingredients are put through a compost turner. Water is sprayed onto the horse manure or synthetic compost as these materials move through the turner. Nitrogen supplements and gypsum are spread over the top of the bulk ingredients and are thoroughly mixed by the turner. Once the pile is wetted and formed, aerobic fermentation (composting) commences as a result of the growth and reproduction of microorganisms, which occur naturally in the bulk ingredients. Heat, ammonia, and carbon dioxide are released as by-products during this process. Compost activators, other than those mentioned, are not needed, although some organic farming books stress the need for an "activator."

Mushroom compost develops as the chemical nature of the raw ingredients is converted by the activity of microorganisms, heat, and some heat-releasing chemical reactions. These events result in a food source most suited for the growth of the mushroom to the exclusion of other fungi and bacteria. There must be adequate moisture, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbohydrates present throughout the process, or else the process will stop. This is why water and supplements are added periodically, and the compost pile is aerated as it moves through the turner.

Gypsum is added to minimize the greasiness compost normally tends to have. Gypsum increases the flocculation of certain chemicals in the compost, and they adhere to straw or hay rather than filling the pores (holes) between the straws. A side benefit of this phenomenon is that air can permeate the pile more readily, and air is essential to the composting process. The exclusion of air results in an airless (anaerobic) environment in which deleterious chemical compounds are formed which detract from the selectivity of mushroom compost for growing mushrooms. Gypsum is added at the outset of composting at 40 lbs. per ton of dry ingredients.

Nitrogen supplements in general use today include brewer?s grain, seed meals of soybeans, peanuts, or cotton, and chicken manure, among others. The purpose of these supplements is to increase the nitrogen content to 1.5 percent for horse manure or 1.7 percent for synthetic, both computed on a dry weight basis. Synthetic compost requires the addition of ammonium nitrate or urea at the outset of composting to provide the compost microflora with a readily available form of nitrogen for their growth and reproduction.

Corn cobs are sometimes unavailable or available at a price considered to be excessive. Substitutes for or complements to corn cobs include shredded hardwood bark, cottonseed hulls, neutralized grape pomace, and cocoa bean hulls. Management of a compost pile containing any one of these materials is unique in the requirements for watering and the interval between turning.

The initial compost pile should be 5 to 6 feet wide, 5 to 6 feet high, and as long as necessary. A two-sided box can be used to form the pile (rick), although some turners are equipped with a "ricker" so a box isn?t needed. The sides of the pile should be firm and dense, yet the center must remain loose throughout Phase I composting. As the straw or hay softens during composting, the materials become less rigid and compactions can easily occur. If the materials become too compact, air cannot move through the pile and an anaerobic environment will develop.

Turning and watering are done at approximately 2-day intervals, but not unless the pile is hot (145? to 170?F). Turning provides the opportunity to water, aerate, and mix the ingredients, as well as to relocate the straw or hay from a cooler to a warmer area in the pile, outside versus inside. Supplements are also added when the ricks are turned, but they should be added early in the composting process. The number of turnings and the time between turnings depends on the condition of the starting material and the time necessary for the compost to heat to temperatures above 145?F.

Water addition is critical since too much will exclude oxygen by occupying the pore space, and too little can limit the growth of bacteria and fungi. As a general rule, water is added up to the point of leaching when the pile is formed and at the time of first turning, and thereafter either none or only a little is added for the duration of composting. On the last turning before Phase II composting, water can be applied generously so that when the compost is tightly squeezed, water drips from it. There is a link between water, nutritive value, microbial activity, and temperature, and because it is a chain, when one condition is limiting for one factor, the whole chain will cease to function. Biologists see this phenomenon repeatedly and have termed it the Law of Limiting Factors.

Phase I composting lasts from 7 to 14 days, depending on the nature of the material at the start and its characteristics at each turn. There is a strong ammonia odor associated with composting, which is usually complemented by a sweet, moldy smell. When compost temperatures are 155?F and higher, and ammonia is present, chemical changes occur which result in a food rather exclusively used by the mushrooms. As a by-product of the chemical changes, heat is released and the compost temperatures increase. Temperatures in the compost can reach 170? to 180?F during the second and third turnings when a desirable level of biological and chemical activity is occurring. At the end of Phase I the compost should: a) have a chocolate brown color; b) have soft, pliable straws, c) have a moisture content of from 68 to 74 percent; and d) have a strong smell of ammonia. When the moisture, temperature, color, and odor described have been reached, Phase I composting is completed.

2. Phase II: Finishing the Compost

There are two major purposes to Phase II composting. Pasteurization is necessary to kill any insects, nematodes, pest fungi, or other pests that may be present in the compost. And second, it is necessary to remove the ammonia which formed during Phase I composting. Ammonia at the end of Phase II in a concentration higher than 0.07 percent is often lethal to mushroom spawn growth, thus it must be removed; generally, a person can smell ammonia when the concentration is above 0.10 percent.

Phase II takes place in one of three places, depending on the type of production system used. For the zoned system of growing, compost is packed into wooden trays, the trays are stacked six to eight high, and are moved into an environmentally controlled Phase II room. Thereafter, the trays are moved to special rooms, each designed to provide the optimum environment for each step of the mushroom growing process. With a bed or shelf system, the compost is placed directly in the beds, which are in the room used for all steps of the crop culture. The most recently introduced system, the bulk system, is one in which the compost is placed in a cement-block bin with a perforated floor and no cover on top of the compost; this is a room specifically designed for Phase II composting.

The compost, whether placed in beds, trays, or bulk, should be filled uniformly in depth and density or compression. Compost density should allow for gas exchange, since ammonia and carbon dioxide will be replaced by outside air.

Phase II composting can be viewed as a controlled, temperature-dependent, ecological process using air to maintain the compost in a temperature range best suited for the de-ammonifying organisms to grow and reproduce. The growth of these thermophilic (heat-loving) organisms depends on the availability of usable carbohydrates and nitrogen, some of the nitrogen in the form of ammonia.

Optimum management for Phase II is difficult to define and most commercial growers tend toward one of the two systems in general use today: high temperature or low temperature.

A high temperature Phase II system involves an initial pasteurization period during which the compost and the air temperature are raised to at least 145?F for 6 hours. This can be accomplished by heat generated during the growth of naturally occurring microorganisms or by injecting steam into the room where the compost has been placed, or both. After pasteurization, the compost is re-conditioned by immediately lowering the temperature to 140?F by flushing the room with fresh air. Thereafter, the compost is allowed to cool gradually at a rate of approximately 2? to 3?F each day until all the ammonia is dissipated. This Phase II system requires approximately 10 to 14 days to complete.

In the low temperature Phase II system the compost temperature is initially increased to about 126?F with steam or by the heat released via microbial growth, after which the air temperature is lowered so the compost is in a temperature range of 125? to 130?F range. During the 4 to 5 days after pasteurization, the compost temperature may be lowered by about 2?F a day until the ammonia is dissipated.

It is important to remember the purposes of Phase II when trying to determine the proper procedure and sequence to follow. One purpose is to remove unwanted ammonia. To this end the temperature range from 125? to 130?F is most efficient since de-ammonifying organisms grow well in this temperature range. A second purpose of Phase II is to remove any pests present in the compost by use of a pasteurization sequence.

At the end of Phase II the compost temperature must be lowered to approximately 75? to 80?F before spawning (planting) can begin. The nitrogen content of the compost should be 2.0 to 2.4 percent, and the moisture content between 68 and 72 percent. Also, at the end of Phase II it is desirable to have 5 to 7 lbs. of dry compost per square foot of bed or tray surface to obtain profitable mushroom yields. It is important to have both the compost and the compost temperatures uniform during the Phase II process since it is desirable to have as homogenous a material as possible.

3. Spawning

Mushroom compost must be inoculated with mushroom spawn (Latin expandere = to spread out) if one expects mushrooms to grow. The mushroom itself is the fruit of a plant as tomatoes are of tomato plants. Within the tomato one finds seeds, and these are used to start the next season's crop. Microscopic spores form within a mushroom cap, but their small size precludes handling them like seeds. As the tomato comes from a plant with roots, stems, and leaves, the mushroom arises from thin, thread-like cells called mycelium. Fungus mycelium is the white, thread-like plant often seen on rotting wood or moldy bread. Mycelium can be propagated vegetatively, like separating daffodil bulbs and getting more daffodil plants. Specialized facilities are required to propagate mycelium, so the mushroom mycelium does not get mixed with the mycelium of other fungi. Mycelium propagated vegetatively is known as spawn, and commercial mushroom farmers purchase spawn from any of about a dozen spawn companies.

Spawn makers start the spawn-making process by sterilizing a mixture of rye grain plus water and chalk; wheat, millet, and other small grain may be substituted for rye. Sterilized horse manure formed into blocks was used as the growth medium for spawn up to about 1940, and this was called block or brick spawn, or manure spawn; such spawn is uncommon now. Once sterilized grain has a bit of mycelium added to it, the grain and mycelium is shaken 3 times at 4-day intervals over a 14-day period of active mycelial growth. Once the grain is colonized by the mycelium, the product is called spawn. Spawn can be refrigerated for a few months, so spawn is made in advance of a farmer?s order for spawn.

In the United States, mushroom growers have a choice of four major mushroom cultivars: a) Smooth white - cap smooth, cap and stalk white; b) Off-white - cap scaly with stalk and cap white; c) Cream - cap smooth to scaly with stalk white and cap white to cream; and d) Brown - cap smooth, cap chocolate brown with a white stalk. Within each of the four major groups, there are various isolates, so a grower may have a choice of up to eight smooth white strains. The isolates vary in flavor, texture, and cultural requirements, but they are all mushrooms. Generally, white and off-white cultivars are used for processed foods like soups and sauces, but all isolates are good eating as fresh mushrooms.

Spawn is distributed on the compost and then thoroughly mixed into the compost. For years this was done by hand, broadcasting the spawn over the surface of the compost and ruffling it in with a small rake-like tool. In recent years, however, for the bed system, spawn is mixed into the compost by a special spawning machine which mixes the compost and spawn with tines or small finger-like devices. In a tray or batch system, spawn is mixed into the compost as it moves along a conveyer belt or while falling from a conveyor into a tray. The spawning rate is expressed as a unit or quart per so many square feet of bed surface; 1 unit per 10 ft? is desirable. The rate is sometimes expressed on the basis of spawn weight versus compost weight; a 2 percent spawning rate is desirable.

Once the spawn has been mixed throughout the compost and the compost worked so the surface is level, the compost temperature is maintained at 75?F and the relative humidity is kept high to minimize drying of the compost surface or the spawn. Under these conditions the spawn will grow - producing a thread-like network of mycelium throughout the compost. The mycelium grows in all directions from a spawn grain, and eventually the mycelium from the different spawn grains fuse together, making a spawned bed of compost one biological entity. The spawn appears as a white to blue-white mass throughout the compost after fusion has occurred. As the spawn grows it generates heat, and if the compost temperature increases to above 80? to 85?F, depending on the cultivar, the heat may kill or damage the mycelium and eliminate the possibility of maximum crop productivity and/or mushroom quality. At temperatures below 74?F, spawn growth is slowed and the time interval between spawning and harvesting is extended.

The time needed for spawn to colonize the compost depends on the spawning rate and its distribution, the compost moisture and temperature, and the nature or quality of the compost. A complete spawn run usually requires 14 to 21 days. Once the compost is fully grown with spawn, the next step in production is at hand.

4. Casing

Casing is a top-dressing applied to the spawn-run compost on which the mushrooms eventually form. Clay-loam field soil, a mixture of peat moss with ground limestone, or reclaimed weathered, spent compost can be used as casing. Casing does not need nutrients since casing act as a water reservoir and a place where rhizomorphs form. Rhizomorphs look like thick strings and form when the very fine mycelium fuses together. Mushroom initials, primordia, or pins form on the rhizomorphs, so without rhizomorphs there will be no mushrooms. Casing should be pasteurized to eliminate any insects and pathogens it may be carrying. Also, it is important that the casing be distributed so the depth is uniform over the surface of the compost. Such uniformity allows the spawn to move into and through the casing at the same rate and, ultimately, for mushrooms to develop at the same time. Casing should be able to hold moisture since moisture is essential for the development of a firm mushroom.

Managing the crop after casing requires that the compost temperature be kept at around 75?F for up to 5 days after casing, and the relative humidity should be high. Thereafter, the compost temperature should be lowered about 2?F each day until small mushroom initials (pins) have formed. Throughout the period following casing, water must be applied intermittently to raise the moisture level to field capacity before the mushroom pins form. Knowing when, how, and how much water to apply to casing is an "art form" which readily separates experienced growers from beginners.

5. Pinning

Mushroom initials develop after rhizomorphs have formed in the casing. The initials are extremely small but can be seen as outgrowths on a rhizomorph. Once an initial quadruples in size, the structure is a pin. Pins continue to expand and grow larger through the button stage, and ultimately a button enlarges to a mushroom. Harvestable mushrooms appear 18 to 21 days after casing. Pins develop when the carbon dioxide content of room air is lowered to 0.08 percent or lower, depending on the cultivar, by introducing fresh air into the growing room. Outside air has a carbon dioxide content of about 0.04 percent.

The timing of fresh air introduction is very important and is something learned only through experience. Generally, it is best to ventilate as little as possible until the mycelium has begun to show at the surface of the casing, and to stop watering at the time when pin initials are forming. If the carbon dioxide is lowered too early by airing too soon, the mycelium stops growing through the casing and mushroom initials form below the surface of the casing. As such mushrooms continue to grow, they push through the casing and are dirty at harvest time. Too little moisture can also result in mushrooms forming below the surface of the casing. Pinning affects both the potential yield and quality of a crop and is a significant step in the production cycle.

6. Cropping

The terms flush, break, or bloom are names given to the repeating 3- to 5-day harvest periods during the cropping cycle; these are followed by a few days when no mushrooms are available to harvest. This cycle repeats itself in a rhythmic fashion, and harvesting can go on as long as mushrooms continue to mature. Most mushroom farmers harvest for 35 to 42 days, although some harvest a crop for 60 days, and harvest can go on for as long as 150 days.

Air temperature during cropping should be held between 57? to 62?F for good results. This temperature range not only favors mushroom growth, but cooler temperatures can lengthen the life cycles of both disease pathogens and insects pests. It may seem odd that there are pests which can damage mushrooms, but no crop is grown that does not have to compete with other organisms. Mushroom pests can cause total crop failures, and often the deciding factor on how long to harvest a crop is based on the level of pest infestation. These pathogens and insects can be controlled by cultural practices coupled with the use of pesticides, but it is most desirable to exclude these organisms from the growing rooms.

The relative humidity in the growing rooms should be high enough to minimize the drying of casing but not so high as to cause the cap surfaces of developing mushrooms to be clammy or sticky. Water is applied to the casing so water stress does not hinder the developing mushrooms; in commercial practice this means watering 2 to 3 times each week. Each watering may consist of more or fewer gallons, depending on the dryness of the casing, the cultivar being grown, and the stage of development of the pins, buttons, or mushrooms. Most first-time growers apply too much water and the surface of the casing seals; this is seen as a loss of texture at the surface of the casing. Sealed casing prevents the exchange of gases essential for mushroom pin formation. One can estimate how much water to add after first break has been harvested by realizing that 90 percent of the mushroom is water and a gallon of water weight 8.3 lbs. If 100 lbs. of mushrooms were harvested, 90 lbs. of water (11 gal.) were removed from the casing; and this is what must be replaced before second break mushrooms develop.

Outside air is used to control both the air and compost temperatures during the harvest period. Outside air also displaces the carbon dioxide given off by the growing mycelium. The more mycelial growth, the more carbon dioxide produced, and since more growth occurs early in the crop, more fresh air is needed during the first two breaks. The amount of fresh air also depends on the growing mushrooms, the area of the producing surface, the amount of compost in the growing room, and the condition or composition of the fresh air being introduced. Experience seems to be the best guide regarding the volume of air required, but there is a rule of thumb: 0.3ft/hr when the compost is 8 inches deep, and of this volume 50 to 100 percent must be outside air.

A question frequently arises concerning the need for illumination while the mushrooms grow. Mushrooms do not require light to grow, only green plants require light for photosynthesis. Growing rooms can be illuminated to facilitate harvesting or cropping practices, but it is more common for workers or mushroom farmers to be furnished with miner?s lamps rather than illuminating an entire room.

Ventilation is essential for mushroom growing, and it is also necessary to control humidity and temperature. Moisture can be added to the air by a cold mist or by live steam, or simply by wetting the walls and floors. Moisture can be removed from the growing room by: 1) admitting a greater volume of outside air; 2) introducing drier air; 3) moving the same amount of outside air and heating it to a higher temperature since warmer air holds more moisture and thus lowers the relative humidity. Temperature control in a mushroom growing room is no different from temperature control in your home. Heat can originate from hot water circulated through pipes mounted on the walls. Hot, forced air can be blown through a ventilation duct, which is rather common at more recently built mushroom farms. There are a few mushroom farms located in limestone caves where the rock acts as both a heating and cooling surface depending on the time of year. Caves of any sort are not necessarily suited for mushroom growing, and abandoned coal mines have too many intrinsic problems to be considered as viable sites for a mushroom farm. Even limestone caves require extensive renovation and improvement before they are suitable for mushroom growing, and only the growing occurs in the cave with composting taking place above ground on a wharf.

Mushrooms are harvested in a 7- to 10-day cycle, but this may be longer or shorter depending on the temperature, humidity, cultivar, and the stage when they are picked. When mature mushrooms are picked, an inhibitor to mushroom development is removed and the next flush moves toward maturity. Mushrooms are normally picked at a time when the veil is not too far extended. Consumers in North America want closed, tight, mushrooms while in England and Australia open, flat mushrooms are desired. The maturity of a mushroom is assessed by how far the veil is stretched, and not by how large the mushroom is. Consequently, mature mushrooms are both large and small, although farmers and consumers alike prefer medium- to large-size mushrooms.

Picking and packaging methods often vary from farm to farm. Freshly harvested mushrooms must be kept refrigerated at 35? to 45?F. To prolong the shelf life of mushrooms, it is important that mushrooms "breathe" after harvest, so storage in a nonwaxed paper bag is preferred to a plastic bag.

After the last flush of mushrooms has been picked, the growing room should be closed off and the room pasteurized with steam. This final pasteurization is designed to destroy any pests which may be present in the crop or the woodwork in the growing room, thus minimizing the likelihood of infesting the next crop.

Conclusion

It takes approximately 15 weeks to complete an entire production cycle, from the start of composting to the final steaming off after harvesting has ended. For this work a mushroom grower can expect anywhere from 0 to 4 ? lbs. per square foot; the national average for 1980 was 3.12 lbs. per square foot. Final yield depends on how well a grower has monitored and controlled the temperature, humidity, pests, and so on. All things considered, the most important factors for good production appear to be experience plus an intuitive feel for the biological rhythms of the commercial mushroom. The production system used to grow a crop can be chosen after the basics of mushroom growing is understood.

 


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Information listed here is for entertainment only and is neither real or proven


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InvisibleMikeD
Stranger
Registered: 08/28/01
Posts: 12
Loc: Penisville, Missisippi
Re: Complete Professional Growing Tek [Re: bluhoney]
    #568234 - 03/03/02 03:32 AM (14 years, 9 months ago)

Good job man, you are pretty good at this stuff.


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Offlinebluhoney
Yes Im a realgirl ,geeesh
Female User Gallery

Registered: 05/24/99
Posts: 936
Last seen: 9 years, 9 months
Re: Complete Professional Growing Tek [Re: MikeD]
    #568455 - 03/03/02 11:34 AM (14 years, 9 months ago)

LOL, well, for a GIRL i do pretty good. Seriously though, I'm a female:)bluhoney


 


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Information listed here is for entertainment only and is neither real or proven


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Invisiblesloluva
....

Registered: 12/26/01
Posts: 2,752
Loc: Ohio
Re: Complete Professional Growing Tek [Re: bluhoney]
    #568592 - 03/03/02 02:12 PM (14 years, 9 months ago)

Ummmmmmm........

Yum and YUM!

8 )



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Invisibleluvdemshrooms
Two inch dick..but it spins!?


Registered: 11/29/01
Posts: 33,808
Loc: Lost In Space
Re: Complete Professional Growing Tek [Re: bluhoney]
    #568595 - 03/03/02 02:16 PM (14 years, 9 months ago)

Marry me Blu!


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You cannot legislate the poor into prosperity by legislating the wealthy out of prosperity. What one person receives without working for another person must work for without receiving. The government cannot give to anybody anything that the government does not first take from somebody else. When half of the people get the idea that they do not have to work because the other half is going to take care of them and when the other half gets the idea that it does no good to work because somebody else is going to get what they work for that my dear friend is the beginning of the end of any nation. You cannot multiply wealth by dividing it. ~ Adrian Rogers


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Offlinebluhoney
Yes Im a realgirl ,geeesh
Female User Gallery

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Re: Complete Professional Growing Tek [Re: luvdemshrooms]
    #568699 - 03/03/02 04:41 PM (14 years, 9 months ago)

:smile:bluhoney 


--------------------
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Invisibleluvdemshrooms
Two inch dick..but it spins!?


Registered: 11/29/01
Posts: 33,808
Loc: Lost In Space
Re: Complete Professional Growing Tek [Re: bluhoney]
    #568775 - 03/03/02 05:48 PM (14 years, 9 months ago)

No one ever takes me seriously!  :frown:


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You cannot legislate the poor into prosperity by legislating the wealthy out of prosperity. What one person receives without working for another person must work for without receiving. The government cannot give to anybody anything that the government does not first take from somebody else. When half of the people get the idea that they do not have to work because the other half is going to take care of them and when the other half gets the idea that it does no good to work because somebody else is going to get what they work for that my dear friend is the beginning of the end of any nation. You cannot multiply wealth by dividing it. ~ Adrian Rogers


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Offlinegirlskater
***meow***

Registered: 12/18/01
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Re: Complete Professional Growing Tek [Re: bluhoney]
    #568816 - 03/03/02 06:27 PM (14 years, 9 months ago)

hey girls probably grow some of the best mushrooms  :smile:


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Offlinejimmy_page
Stranger
Registered: 01/10/02
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Re: Complete Professional Growing Tek [Re: bluhoney]
    #568844 - 03/03/02 06:58 PM (14 years, 9 months ago)

damn blu,  from what i can see in those picks- you're fucking HOT.  how about some more w/o the panties on?  hey.  if you got it, flaunt it. :smile:

oh yeah. nice tek too


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hey. as long as my joints burn evenly i'm alright


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OfflineMushyMay
Brian Eno is mypersonal God FNORD

Registered: 02/19/02
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Loc: ACT, Australia
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Re: Complete Professional Growing Tek [Re: jimmy_page]
    #568940 - 03/03/02 08:42 PM (14 years, 9 months ago)

I've never even met a girl that has had shrooms. Well other than a few chicks who have eaten maybe 1 or 2 crappy dried shrooms at parties with little or no effect.

You seem serious about your mushrooms bluehoney. What a great tek. Any tips for small indoor growing? Views on the ol' PF tek?


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MushyMay is a fictional character, as a result any information provided by MushyMay is also fictitious.


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Anonymous

Re: Complete Professional Growing Tek [Re: bluhoney]
    #568951 - 03/03/02 09:15 PM (14 years, 9 months ago)

Wow...you're purty!

And hot!


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Offlinebluhoney
Yes Im a realgirl ,geeesh
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Re: Complete Professional Growing Tek [Re: ]
    #568956 - 03/03/02 09:23 PM (14 years, 9 months ago)

Blu honey straw tek
Items you will need:
Spore syringe
12 pint canning jars (wide mouth)
Pressure cooker
Wheat straw
Whole brown rice
Vermiculite
Perlite
Styrofoam cooler w/ lid
3mil plastic covering
1 fork
lighter
rubber gloves
Lysol
Dust mask
25 gallon Rubbermaid container (clear) w/ lid
thermometer
humidity gauge
light source
4 shoebox sized dark colored container?s
Fishnet laundry bag


Start:
Through out the whole process the area needs to be clean and free from moving air.
Substrate Preparation:
In a large sauce pan, cook completely 4 servings of whole brown rice as per directions. While it is hot, mix in 2 cups of vermiculite real good . Next fill your jars half way up with this mixture. Put the lids on with the rubber side up. Do not tighten them, keep them on very loosely.
Place the jars in your pressure cooker and fill as per directions with water. Pressure cook them at 15 PSI for 45 minutes. Then take the pressure cooker to a VERY clean place. The bathroom works well, just make sure and clean it very good and spray a lot of Lysol in there before taking the cooker in. Let the cooker cool overnight. When you enter the room the next morning wear a hat, dust mask, and rubber gloves, also spray yourself very good with Lysol. Bring with you your spore syringe. Take the syringe and heat the needle until it is glowing red. While its cooling off. Bring in your Styrofoam container and spray it very well with Lysol, then place next to you.
One by one, take the jars out and in one quick motion barely lift the lid just enough to squirt 1 cc in the jar. Quickly close the lid and tighten. Now shake the jars a lot to disperse the spores. Loosen the lid and place in the Styrofoam cooler. Repeat the process for all the jars, make sure to heat the needle in-between jars. Put the lid on the cooler and put it in a warm dark place. After about a week check the jars for growth and also for contaminants. If you find any contaminated jars throw them out immediately.
After the jars become fully colonized leave them alone for another 4 days. Then move to the bulk growing phase.
Wheat Straw preparation:
Get about 4 big hand fulls of wheat straw and put it in a BIG bowl. Take a pair of scissors and chop it up into about two to three inch pieces. (this takes some time but its worth it) Fill your laundry bag with the straw and tie the top. Place the bag in a VERY LARGE pot. Fill with water until the bag is covered. Place a weight of some sorts on the bag to hold it under or else it will float. Heat your water until it almost boils, and keep it here for 1 hour. This is known as pasteurization and gets the germs out, but keeps the protective contaminant barrier coating on the straw. Once cooked, take the bag out and place it in the sink to both cool and drain.
Now get your shoebox growing containers and clean them very good with Lysol and let them dry. Take the containers and pour a thin layer of plain dry vermiculite on the bottom. Next place a thin layer of wheat straw on top of the vermiculite. Now take your fully colonized jars and take the lids off. Take out a fully colonized cake and break pieces up about the size of a quarter and drop them around on top of the straw. Next place a thin layer of straw on top the cake pieces. Then more cake pieces on top of that. Keep repeating these steps until your ?sandwich layered? substrate has been created in all containers. The top layer should be nothing but wheat straw.
Place a small sheet of the 3mil plastic in each container covering the straw. Press down with a lot of weight to squeeze the layers together. With a fork, heat it with a lighter and melt holes all around on the plastic so the mycelia can breathe. Now place these containers back in the dark for about a week to 2 weeks. Keep the temperatures at around 86 degrees.
Fruiting Preparation:
After mycelia has almost covered the top layer of wheat straw, move on to the fruiting stage. Take the plastic covering off all the trays and dis-guard.
Take your 25 gallon Rubbermaid container and wash very good with Lysol and let dry. Then fill with about four inches of wet perlite( take a bag of perlite and fill with one bottle of H20 and water then drain). Now place your containers with straw and mycelia on top of the perlite. Place a thermometer and humidity gauge inside. Now put the top on and place near a light source. The temperature should be in the 70?s for fruiting, but mushrooms are pretty flexible, so a range of 70-90 should be fine. The humidity should stay around 80-90 %. In about 1 or 2 weeks you should see pins starting to form. Now start fanning the Rubbermaid container with its own lid about 4 times a day. If you notice all the humidity is drying off the sides, then lower your fanning some, to 1or 2 a day. After the mushrooms break their veil you can pick them. Make sure to pick all of the aborts as well( small discolored pins that stopped growing).
There you have it, now go have some fun with growing.
Disclaimer: this tek is for informational purposes only and should not be taken seriously.

Now if you want to make compost on a small scale, skip the first part of this and go down to the Mini-tek . Hope all this helps.:)bluhoney
Nitrogen source:
70 pounds of horse manure
50 pounds of chicken manure
50 pounds of cow manure
20 pounds of blood meal
Carbohydrate source:
4 bales of wheatstraw
20 pounds of rice straw
50 pounds of cottonseed meal
Blending and curing items:
80 pounds of gypsum(essential for compost, prevents it from becoming greasy, provides Ca++ ions, a mineral essential to mushroom growth)
20 pounds of Superphosphate(promotes vigorous mycelial growth, but dont use to much it will turn the compost acidic to soon)
20 pounds of sulfate of potash( calcium carbonate)
1 gallon of compost activators.
Directions for use:
Soak the wheat straw for about a week, then drain out water and place in a large dark colored bin. Mix in all other ingrediants evenly and use water as needed to keep it moist not soaked. At about three days the temperature inside the compost will reach very high temps. Thats good, everything is working right. when the temperature begins to fall, turn the pile and mix it up again( around 6 days) do this until the pile turns a rich blackish brown color. Very airy with a lot of texture. My friend let heres cure for 3 months. But This time can be shortened. Depends on how much you have and how you want it cured.
    * Now for the descrete people, here is a mini tek: 5 pounds chicken manure,(reason for chicken is its higher in nitrogen and phosphorous than horse and cow) halfbale of soaked wheatstraw(essential), 1pound bloodmeal, 2 pounds of cottonseed meal. 1 cup of superphosphate, 1 pound of potash, 3 pounds of gypsum,1 8 oz bag of activators.
Both of the above recipies can be altered very much in amounts. You just have to experiment. And remember to check your ph regularly. Try to keep it at around 7-8. This can be done by purchasing a small ph test kit at a pet store . 


--------------------
Information listed here is for entertainment only and is neither real or proven


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InvisibleRoadkill
Retired Shroomery Mod
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Registered: 12/11/01
Posts: 22,598
Loc: Snoqualmie, Wa.
Trusted Cultivator
Re: Complete Professional Growing Tek [Re: bluhoney]
    #569251 - 03/04/02 04:04 AM (14 years, 9 months ago)

What a hotty !!!!

nice gap!!!!!!!!

And smart too.

:wink: 


--------------------
Laterz, Road

Who the hell you callin crazy?
You wouldn't know what crazy was if Charles Manson was eating froot loops on your front porch!


Brainiac said:
PM the names with on there names, that means they have mushrooms for sale.



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Invisibleluvdemshrooms
Two inch dick..but it spins!?


Registered: 11/29/01
Posts: 33,808
Loc: Lost In Space
Re: Complete Professional Growing Tek [Re: bluhoney]
    #569742 - 03/04/02 05:34 PM (14 years, 9 months ago)

A bump for blu. Truly a beautiful and talented woman.


--------------------
You cannot legislate the poor into prosperity by legislating the wealthy out of prosperity. What one person receives without working for another person must work for without receiving. The government cannot give to anybody anything that the government does not first take from somebody else. When half of the people get the idea that they do not have to work because the other half is going to take care of them and when the other half gets the idea that it does no good to work because somebody else is going to get what they work for that my dear friend is the beginning of the end of any nation. You cannot multiply wealth by dividing it. ~ Adrian Rogers


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OfflineHumboldtHort
newbie
Registered: 02/13/02
Posts: 40
Last seen: 12 years, 8 months
Re: Complete Professional Growing Tek [Re: bluhoney]
    #569766 - 03/04/02 06:29 PM (14 years, 9 months ago)



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A gram is better than a damn


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Offlinebluhoney
Yes Im a realgirl ,geeesh
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Re: Complete Professional Growing Tek [Re: HumboldtHort]
    #569918 - 03/04/02 09:54 PM (14 years, 9 months ago)

That site has really good info on growing professionally, sorry I didnt post the link before HumboldtHort:)bluhoney
 


--------------------
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InvisibleTarga
newbie
Registered: 03/29/02
Posts: 41
Re: Complete Professional Growing Tek [Re: bluhoney]
    #596427 - 04/02/02 01:13 PM (14 years, 8 months ago)

Blu:  Are those pics of you, or a friend?  What a tease, posting that second pic! :wink:

Anyway, thanks for the Tek toward the end of the thread, I'm saving that to my hard drive! :smile: 

Umm...the left hand is kind of in a fist...can't see if there's a wedding or engagement ring....darn!  :laugh:


Edited by Targa (04/02/02 01:20 PM)


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Offlinebluhoney
Yes Im a realgirl ,geeesh
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Registered: 05/24/99
Posts: 936
Last seen: 9 years, 9 months
Re: Complete Professional Growing Tek [Re: Targa]
    #596872 - 04/02/02 07:52 PM (14 years, 8 months ago)

Targa, i'll leave that to your imagination....;)bluhoney 


--------------------
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InvisibleRedeyedElf
enthusiast
Registered: 10/30/01
Posts: 245
Re: Complete Professional Growing Tek [Re: bluhoney]
    #596962 - 04/02/02 09:12 PM (14 years, 8 months ago)

My GF has those same panties?

Darling?

hehe
j/k


--------------------
When the walls quit melting, I'll think of a sig


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InvisibleLanaV
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Registered: 10/28/99
Posts: 3,078
Loc: www.MycoSupply.com
Re: Complete Professional Growing Tek [Re: bluhoney]
    #597861 - 04/03/02 07:53 PM (14 years, 8 months ago)



--------------------
Myco Supply - Distributors of Mycological Products
http://www.MycoSupply.com

The Premiere Source for Mushroom Growing Supplies.
Visit us online or call us toll free


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