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InvisiblePrisoner#1
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Planting Guide, long but well worth the read *pics*
    #3872990 - 03/05/05 03:18 PM (12 years, 3 months ago)

Spring is coming and most of us will be starting gardens for food crops, start
your planning now in order to maximize space, minimize the use of fertilizers
and eliminate the use of pesticides. There are many plants that grow well
togetherand others that dont, some work well for the improvement of flavor, soil
as well as pest and disease resistance, one thing I've learned over the years,
pests prefer a less healthy plant

Although generaly not used as food crops, some plants are quite vital for
attracting/repelling various insects

NASTURTIUMS: This plant is one I consider to be vital, use it as a
barrier around tomatoes, radishes, cabbage, cucumbers, and under fruit trees.
Deters wooly aphids, whiteflies, squash bug, cucumber beetles and other pests of
the curcurbit family. Great trap crop for  aphids (in particular the black
aphids) which it does attract, onces the plant has attracted a large
number of aphids, just uproot the plant and burn it.

Nastursiums prefer poor soil with low moisture and no fertilizer, some fruit
growers that planting nasturtiums every year in the root zone of fruit trees
allow the trees to take up the pungent odor of the plants and repel bugs. It has
no taste effect on the fruit. The leaves, flowers and seeds are
all edible and wonderful in salads.



STINGING NETTLES: The flowers attract bees. Sprays made from these are
rich in silica and calcium. Nettles improve the disease resistance of most
plants. Leaving the mixture to rot, it then makes an excellent liquid feed.
Comfrey improves the liquid feed even more. Hairs on the nettles' leaves contain
formic acid which "stings" you. For those with a cow or two for milking,
Stinging Nettle is excellent for a feed/grazing addition, it really gives the
milk a wonderful sweet flavor



MARIGOLDS: (Calendula): Given a lot of credit as a pest deterrent. Keeps
soil free of bad nematodes; supposed to discourage many insects. Plant freely
throughout the garden. The marigolds you choose must be a scented variety for
them to work. One down side is that marigolds do attract spider mites and slugs.

French Marigold (T. Patula) has roots that exude a substance which spreads
in their immediate vicinity killing nematodes. For nematode control you want to
plant dense areas of them. There have been some studies done that proved this
nematode killing effect lasted for several years after the plants were These
marigolds also help to deter whiteflies when planted around tomatoes and can be
used in greenhouses for the same purpose. Whiteflies hate the smell of
marigolds. Mexican marigold (T.  minuta) is the most powerful of the insect
repelling marigolds and may also overwhelm weed roots such as bind weed and is
said to repel the Mexican bean beetle and wild bunnies, Be careful it can
have an herbicidal effect on some plants like beans and cabbage.




GERANIUMS:Repels cabbage worms and Japanese beetles, plant around grapes,
roses, corn, and cabbage. White geraniums are said to draw Japanese beetles to
feast on the foliage which in turn kills them.



CHRYSANTHEMUMS: C. coccineum kills the bad root nematodes, it's a good
alternative to marigold. It's flowers along with those of C. cineraruaefolium
have been used as botanical pesticides for centuries (pyrethrum). White
flowering chrysanthemums repel Japanese beetles.



MORNING GLORIES: They attract hoverflies, hover flies eat aphids. Plus
if you want a fast growing annual vine to cover something up morning glory is an
excellent choice, plus we all know the additional benefits of morning glories. :grin:



BEE BALM: (Oswego, Monarda) this wild flower is great for attracting
beneficial insects and bees of course it does tend to get powdery mildew.



GERMAN/ROMAN CHAMOMILE: Improves flavor of cabbages, cucumbers and
onions. Host to hoverflies and wasps. Accumulates calcium, potassium and sulfur,
later returning them to the soil. Increases oil production from herbs. Leave
some flowers unpicked and German chamomile will reseed itself. Roman chamomile
is a low growing perennial that will tolerate almost any soil conditions. Both
like full sun. Growing chamomile of any type is considered a tonic for anything
you grow in the garden.


CLOVER: Clover attracts many beneficial insects. Useful planted around
apple trees to attract predators of the woolly aphid and Long used as a green
manure when tilled into the ground at the end of the growing season



DAHLIAS:  repel nematodes



FOUR-O'CLOCKS: These are like magnets for japanese beetles which then
dine on the foliage. The foliage is toxic to them, plant somewhere away from
your food crops to avoid the beetles attacking your dinner. It is important
to mention that Four O"clocks are also poisonous to humans. Please be careful
where you plant them if you have children.



LARKSPUR: A member of the Delphinium family, larkspur will attract
Japanese beetles. They dine and die! Larkspur Like Four-O-Clocks are poisonous
to humans as well, plant carefully with children.


LAMIUM Spotted Deadnettle, This will repel potato bugs which is a plague
for many gardeners


LAVENDER: Exelent Repellant for fleas and moths. Prolific flowering
lavender nourishes many nectar feeding and beneficial insects. Use dried sprigs
of lavender to repel moths. Start plants in winter from cuttings, setting out in spring.


LEMON BALM: Sprinkle throughout the garden in an herbal powder mixture to
deter many bugs. Lemon balm has citronella compounds that make this work: crush
and rub the leaves on your skin to keep mosquitoes away. Lemon Balm is also
great for warding off squash bugs


POACHED EGG PLANT: sweetly fragrant native plant, you can expect great
resistance to weather, poor soil, and other hardships that slow down "imports",
Grow poached egg plant with tomatoes, they will attract hover flies butterflies
and bees, great for pllination of your crops.



WORMWOOD: Keeps animals out of the garden when planted as a border. An
excellent deterrent to most insects. A tea made from wormwood will repel cabbage
moths, slugs, snails, black flea beetles and fleas effectively. The two best
varieties for making insect spray are Silver King and Powis Castle. Adversely
Powis castle attracts ladybugs which in turn breed directly on the plant. Silver
Mound is great as a border plant and the most toxic wormwood. Note: As
wormwood actually produces a botanical poison do not use it directly on food crops.



thats all for the time being, I have some more seed to start in order to get my
garden going this year, I'll be adding a great deal more later today (I hope)
most of it being herbs and veggies. hopefully this  little bit helps you see
how a well planned garden needs less maintainence and provide better foods for your table


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Offlinekadakuda
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Re: Planting Guide, long but well worth the read/ [Re: Prisoner#1]
    #3874476 - 03/05/05 09:49 PM (12 years, 3 months ago)

good stuff man. i too LOVE to have nasturtiums around. one of my favourtie "look at" garden plants. i dont eat much of it, but in the spring/summer/fall it makes up a very large portion of my lizards diets. great stuff and very healthy.

id jsut liek to add that monring glories, depending on species, grow incredibly fast and often choke out other plants. i have dug up literally 30+ feet of root from a single plant. these things can spread fast (their roots go deep, far, and pop up new plants everywhere), and often twist around other plants to reach better light (often killing that plant). anyway i would jsut be sure to keep their roots controlled as much as possible.


--------------------
The seeds you won't sow are the plants you dont grow.


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InvisibleWorld Spirit
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Re: Planting Guide, long but well worth the read/ [Re: Prisoner#1]
    #3874527 - 03/05/05 09:57 PM (12 years, 3 months ago)

:thumbup:


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InvisibleRipple
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Re: Planting Guide, long but well worth the read/ [Re: Prisoner#1]
    #3874575 - 03/05/05 10:04 PM (12 years, 3 months ago)

Wonderful Post man!

Morning glories tend to take over the garden by August though! They just vine all over the dam place, and I have space constraints, so planting barrier type plants would take up vital space. How large does Nasturtium get?


--------------------
The bus came by and I got on that's when it all began!



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InvisibleWorld Spirit
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Re: Planting Guide, long but well worth the read/ [Re: Prisoner#1]
    #3874669 - 03/05/05 10:24 PM (12 years, 3 months ago)

It would be cool if there was a high-grade picture of each plant next to the description.
/nudge nudge  :wink:


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InvisiblePrisoner#1
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Re: Planting Guide, long but well worth the read/ [Re: Ripple]
    #3875119 - 03/06/05 12:13 AM (12 years, 3 months ago)

Quote:

Ripple said:
How large does Nasturtium get?




nastursiums and geraniums are usualy fairly compact, a little pruning will still
achieve the same result and keep the plants small. I'm trying to accomodate
those with container gardens as well as people like myself that will be doing
10+ acres this year, how big an area are you working with and are you soil or
container growing... I may be able to help you come up with a good plan.


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InvisiblePrisoner#1
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Re: Planting Guide, long but well worth the read/ [Re: World Spirit]
    #3875122 - 03/06/05 12:15 AM (12 years, 3 months ago)

Quote:

Enter said:
It would be cool if there was a high-grade picture of each plant next to the description.
/nudge nudge  :wink:





I was actualy planning on doing just that, I even put it in but deleted that
paragraph so as to not get everyones hopes up too quit, I wouldnt want you guys
thinking I was competent.


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InvisiblePrisoner#1
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Re: Planting Guide, long but well worth the read/ [Re: kadakuda]
    #3875147 - 03/06/05 12:23 AM (12 years, 3 months ago)

Quote:

kadakuda said:
id jsut liek to add that monring glories, depending on species, grow incredibly fast and often choke out other plants.  i have dug up literally 30+ feet of root from a single plant.




well, luckily I have a tractor to work with, 65HP of morning glory killing machine!

if you noticed, I mentioned its good as a cover, not something to use in with
your food crops, it's also great for a border, attract bees, hoover flies and
parasitic wasps and you are going to increase your yeilds and reduce aphids
like they say, the flowers are sweeter in the other side of the Ipomoea  :wink:


they are good for erosion control and other problems that we have here in the
south, they introduced Kudzu for that reason and it turned out to be a bigger
foe than friend.


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Offlinekadakuda
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Re: Planting Guide, long but well worth the read/ [Re: Prisoner#1]
    #3875324 - 03/06/05 01:19 AM (12 years, 3 months ago)

Quote:

Prisoner#1 said:
well, luckily I have a tractor to work with, 65HP of morning glory killing machine!





:lol:!!!!


--------------------
The seeds you won't sow are the plants you dont grow.


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OfflineKerr
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Re: Planting Guide, long but well worth the read/ [Re: kadakuda]
    #3875363 - 03/06/05 01:31 AM (12 years, 3 months ago)

What I find with Morning Glories is that it is too hot here during the day and the blooms get limp and die the same day. We did have them in direct sun till about 1:00pm, this year I think I will give them a bit if shade in order to save those beautiful blooms :smile:


--------------------
"Easy going and organic thoughts bent on self experimentation and knowledge and growth for the betterment of self and those around us"
-Playdo the philosophiser


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InvisibleToolTroll
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Re: Planting Guide, long but well worth the read/ [Re: Kerr]
    #3877031 - 03/06/05 01:46 PM (12 years, 3 months ago)

RyanKerr - That's why they're called "morning" glories. :smile: When mine are in full bloom, one reason to drag my ass out of bed in the morning is to see the blue and purple blooms before they succumb to the daytime. But they are an invasive plant.

Prisoner #1 - Great post, thanks for the information. A lot of those plants are new to me and I'll have to look into. I haven't had much luck with nasturtiums, maybe I've been overfeeding them? And I love marigolds, they are the first plant I grew as a child. Memory-laden blossoms, and I love orange in my garden. Can't wait for the update, I'm picking out seeds to start this week and can use some ideas. So far I'm gonna plant tomatoes(suprise!!!), allysum, calendula, celosia, petunias, lemon balm, and new this year Orange Paper Lanterns, Crape Myrtle, and Aster. Of course these are just the "6-8 weeks before frost" plants. Anyway, thanks and watch out for the kudzu! :peace:


--------------------
"This whole idea that different is bad, that a change in consciousness is in itself harmful, is really one of the fundamental problems inherent in the drug war.” - Rick Doblin
my cactus collection
You vote with your dollars. Everyday. Vote responsibly.


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Offlinekadakuda
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Re: Planting Guide, long but well worth the read/ [Re: ToolTroll]
    #3877061 - 03/06/05 01:56 PM (12 years, 3 months ago)

its just not a garden without a couple perrenial vines in my eyes :wink:


--------------------
The seeds you won't sow are the plants you dont grow.


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Offlinenamaste
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Re: Planting Guide, long but well worth the read/ [Re: kadakuda]
    #3877134 - 03/06/05 02:18 PM (12 years, 3 months ago)

or a few Mamoth Sunflowers, they also bring a lot of bees who let me pet them.

Great post Prisoner, you have given us many ideas :tongue2:


--------------------


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InvisibleRipple
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Re: Planting Guide, long but well worth the read/ [Re: Prisoner#1]
    #3877868 - 03/06/05 05:05 PM (12 years, 3 months ago)

My main Garden is 10 x 25 feet and gets full sunlight, I have a strip on the side of the house that is 4 x 50 feet and gets partial sunlight that I use to start out seedlings before transplanting, and use for lettuce and a few other vegetables that do not require a lot of sunlight during the hot summer months.

Last year I planted squash in the low sun area and only yielded a small amount of fruit even though the plants flourished and had many flowers.

I use the flowers for cooking so it was fine.

I planted cucumbers, string beans, Tomatoes and peppers in the main garden. The cucumbers and string beans against the fence so the vines had something to climb on.

I usually plan it out on paper so I would love any help in planning, it's half the fun! :smile:


--------------------
The bus came by and I got on that's when it all began!



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OfflineKerr
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Re: Planting Guide, long but well worth the read/ [Re: ToolTroll]
    #3878485 - 03/06/05 06:29 PM (12 years, 3 months ago)

So the blooms only do stay a short while, I had just seen some last summer that had alot more blooms than mine and wondered if theirs were staying and not dropping off :smile: Thanks for clearing it up


--------------------
"Easy going and organic thoughts bent on self experimentation and knowledge and growth for the betterment of self and those around us"
-Playdo the philosophiser


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Re: Planting Guide, long but well worth the read/ [Re: Kerr]
    #3887872 - 03/08/05 04:59 PM (12 years, 3 months ago)

This should be sticky until the spring!


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InvisiblePrisoner#1
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Re: Planting Guide, long but well worth the read/ [Re: ToolTroll]
    #3888481 - 03/08/05 06:57 PM (12 years, 3 months ago)

Quote:

ToolTroll said:
Prisoner #1 - Great post, thanks for the information.  I haven't had much luck with nasturtiums, And I love marigolds, they are the first plant, So far I'm gonna plant tomatoes(suprise!!!)




I already have mine started, dropped some seeds in trays last week and I've got
a few sprouts coming up this morning. I also did some carrots and artichokes,
hopefully we keep the warm weather so they dont get frost damage when I put them
out... with your tomatoes, put out some basil and some carrots, the basil does
well with them in the garden and in the pot...  :grin: the long taproot on the
carrot helps to pull nutrients from down deep and make sure you compost anything
that you arent harvesting, and always try and keep tomatos planted where tomatos
were.


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OfflineKerr
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Re: Planting Guide, long but well worth the read/ [Re: Prisoner#1]
    #3888561 - 03/08/05 07:18 PM (12 years, 3 months ago)

I have also got quite a few things coming up now under a flourescent bulb. Nasturtiums, Sunflowers, Wild and Commercial Tobacco, Passion Flower, Morning Glories(Heavenly Blues and Flying Saucers, Amaranthus, Columbine, Peanuts, Peppers and some various houseplants, like Ivy, Vicks plant cuttings, Jade plants and Mother of Thousands. Happy Gardening :smile:


--------------------
"Easy going and organic thoughts bent on self experimentation and knowledge and growth for the betterment of self and those around us"
-Playdo the philosophiser


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InvisiblePrisoner#1
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Re: Planting Guide, long but well worth the read/ [Re: Ripple]
    #3888649 - 03/08/05 07:32 PM (12 years, 3 months ago)

Quote:

Ripple said:
My main Garden is 10 x 25 feet and gets full sunlight, I have a strip on the side of the house that is 4 x 50 feet and gets partial sunlight that I use to start out seedlings before transplanting, and use for lettuce and a few other vegetables that do not require a lot of sunlight during the hot summer months.





thats actualy a pretty good sized garden, with your lettuce, try interplanting
some green onion, lettuce helps them out, I usualy put the onions out first
and then as they mature I'll pull every other one for table/cooking use and
put my lettuce in the empty spaces

something that benefits your lettuce is your cucumbers, strawberries and carrots, if you throw some radishes in with the lettuce you'll have the
absolute best radishes ever.


Quote:

Last year I planted squash in the low sun area and only yielded a small amount of fruit even though the plants flourished and had many flowers.
I use the flowers for cooking so it was fine.
I planted cucumbers, string beans, Tomatoes and peppers in the main garden. The cucumbers and string beans against the fence so the vines had something to climb on.




as I mentioned, planting basil and tcarrots with your tomatos really helps all three out, just make sure you dont put cabbage, potatoes or fennel out with them, they give off something that causes the tomatoes to do very poorly, and
tomatoes make potatoes more susceptable to potatoe blight. Adding asparagus, in near them they protect the asparagus from beetles you can also put onions, chives, garlic, the garlic protects them from spider mites.

avoid planting corn (I noticed you didnt have it listed) near your tomatos, the
corn earworm looks just like the tomato fruit worm, the also seem to attract the
pests, planting corn will give you a good alternative to using the fence as a
trellis, corn loves nitrogen and the pole beans can provide all they can handle,
planting your cucumbers, squash, a few mellons or peas with the corn is
beneficial to all of them, the vines of the peas and beans make use of the
stalks and make picking easier. the vines from the cucumbers and the pumpkins
keep out critters like raccoons, and cut down on birds and such. add some
marigolsd and nastursiums through out your garden and they should rid you of
aphids and japanese beetles, the corn also helps to shade the mellons, cucumbers
and squash. the vines and leaves also do a bit to provide a mulch of sorts
incase the weather gets a bit dry.

try planting things like peppers between some of the taller plants, they serve
as a wind break for the peppers and the peppers give off an enzyme that helps
with most plants with strong rooting.

I hope this helps you maximixe your space a little more, I knew a guy that made
about $5000 a season on a 1/4 acre lot by planting like this


edit: toss a few sunflowers out with the corn as well, it should draw more
insects to polinate the corn and increase your yeild.


Edited by Prisoner#1 (03/08/05 07:35 PM)


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InvisiblePrisoner#1
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Re: Planting Guide, long but well worth the read/ [Re: Kerr]
    #3888742 - 03/08/05 07:51 PM (12 years, 3 months ago)

Quote:

RyanKerr said:
I have also got quite a few things coming up now under a flourescent bulb. Nasturtiums, Sunflowers, Wild and Commercial Tobacco, Passion Flower, Morning Glories(Heavenly Blues and Flying Saucers, Amaranthus, Columbine, Peanuts, Peppers and some various houseplants, like Ivy, Vicks plant cuttings, Jade plants and Mother of Thousands. Happy Gardening :smile:




passion flower grows here like a weed, until I found this site, I never knew it
was anything more, hell, I cant even find one now that I know the secret.
use those sunflowers for the morning glories, you'll get more blooms and you
may want to dead head them to keep the place from being over run.

I just started about 90 tomatos, an ass load of carrots, and some artichokes
I also have 23 little mimosa hostilis that are doing well. I'm about to start my
peppers and a host of other stuff including kiwis... all mine is simply testing
to see whats most suitable to certain areas of my yard... hopefully next year
I'll have cold enough weather to start getting fruit trees set out, no one
will ship them unless they're dormant and it hasnt been cold enough to keep them
dormant the last 2 years.


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