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OfflineHagbardCeline
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Can plants think? New research opens a window to the minds of plants
    #3864858 - 03/03/05 10:23 PM (12 years, 7 months ago)

I know some of you might not like this source, I just got the link off WIRED!, but this isn't something I think the naysayers would normally object to. I haven't ever read enough of their stuff to really have proper opinion about their credibility.

USA
from the March 03, 2005 edition

New research opens a window on the minds of plants
By Patrik Jonsson | Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor
RALEIGH, N.C. ? Hardly articulate, the tiny strangleweed, a pale parasitic plant, can sense the presence of friends, foes, and food, and make adroit decisions on how to approach them.

Mustard weed, a common plant with a six-week life cycle, can't find its way in the world if its root-tip statolith - a starchy "brain" that communicates with the rest of the plant - is cut off.
(Photograph)
SMARTS? The field of plant neurobiology is finding signs of intelligence across the flora spectrum.
ROBERT HARBISON - THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR/FILE



The ground-hugging mayapple plans its growth two years into the future, based on computations of weather patterns. And many who visit the redwoods of the Northwest come away awed by the trees' survival for millenniums - a journey that, for some trees, precedes the Parthenon.

As trowel-wielding scientists dig up a trove of new findings, even those skeptical of the evolving paradigm of "plant intelligence" acknowledge that, down to the simplest magnolia or fern, flora have the smarts of the forest. Some scientists say they carefully consider their environment, speculate on the future, conquer territory and enemies, and are often capable of forethought - revelations that could affect everyone from gardeners to philosophers.

Indeed, extraordinary new findings on how plants investigate and respond to their environments are part of a sprouting debate over the nature of intelligence itself.

"The attitude of people is changing quite substantially," says Anthony Trewavas, a plant

biochemist at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland and a prominent scholar of plant intelligence. "The idea of intelligence is going from the very narrow view that it's just human to something that's much more generally found in life."

To be sure, there are no signs of Socratic logic or Shakespearean thought, and the subject of plant "brains" has sparked heated exchanges at botany conferences. Plants, skeptics scoff, surely don't fall in love, bake souffl?s, or ponder poetry. And can a simple reaction to one's environment truly qualify as active, intentional reasoning?

But the late Nobel Prize-winning plant geneticist Barbara McClintock called plant cells "thoughtful." Darwin wrote about root-tip "brains." Not only can plants communicate with each other and with insects by coded gas exhalations, scientists say now, they can perform Euclidean geometry calculations through cellular computations and, like a peeved boss, remember the tiniest transgression for months.

To a growing number of biologists, the fact that plants are now known to challenge and exert power over other species is proof of a basic intellect.

"If intelligence is the capacity to acquire and apply knowledge, then, absolutely, plants are intelligent," agrees Leslie Sieburth, a biologist at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City.

For philosophers, one of the key findings is that two cuttings, or clones, taken from the same "mother plant" behave differently even when planted in identical conditions.

"We now know there's an ability of self-recognition in plants, which is highly unusual and quite extraordinary that it's actually there," says Dr. Trewavas. "But why has no one come to grips with it? Because the prevailing view of a plant, even among plant biologists, is that it's a simple organism that grows reproducibly in a flower pot."

But here at the labs on the North Carolina State campus, where fluorescent grow-rooms hold genetic secrets and laser microscopes parse the inner workings of live plants, there is still skepticism about the ability of ordinary houseplants to intellectualize their environment.

Most plant biologists are still looking at the mysteries of "signal transduction," or how genetic, chemical, and hormonal orders are dispersed for complex plant behavior. But skeptics say it's less a product of intelligence than mechanical directives, more genetic than genius. Some see the attribution of intelligence to plants as relative - an oversimplification of a complex human trait.

And despite intensifying research, exactly how a plant's complex orders are formulated and carried out remains draped in leafy mystery.

"There is still much that we do not know about how plants work, but a big part of intelligence is self-consciousness, and plants do not have that," says Heike Winter Sederoff, a plant biologist at N.C. State.

Still, a new NASA grant awarded to the university to study gravitational effects on crop plants came in part due to new findings that plants have neurotransmitters very similar to humans' - capable, perhaps, of offering clues on how gravity affects more sentient beings. The National Science Foundation has awarded a $5 million research grant to pinpoint the molecular clockwork by which plants know when to grow and when to flower.

The new field of plant neurobiology holds its first conference - The First Symposium on Plant Neurobiology - in May in Florence, Italy.

The debate is rapidly moving past the theoretical. In space, "smart plants" can provide not only food, oxygen, and clean air, but also valuable companionship for lonely space travelers, say some - a boon for astronauts if America is to go to Mars. Research on the workings of the mustard weed's statolith, for example, may one day yield a corn crop with 1-3/8 the gravitational force of Earth.

Some Earth-bound farmers, meanwhile, see the possibility of communicating with plants to time waterings for ultimate growth. A new gene, Bypass-1, found by University of Utah researchers, may make that possible.

Still, it can be hard for the common houseplant to command respect - even among those who study it most closely.

"When I was a postdoc, I had a neighbor who watched me buy plants, forget to water them, and throw them out, buy them and throw them out," says Dr. Sieburth. "When she found out I had a PhD in botany, I thought she was going to die."

http://www.csmonitor.com/2005/0303/p01s03-usgn.html


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I keep it real because I think it is important that a highly esteemed individual such as myself keep it real lest they experience the dreaded spontaneous non-existance of no longer keeping it real. - Hagbard Celine


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OfflineMadweed420shroom
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Re: Can plants think? New research opens a window to the minds of plants [Re: HagbardCeline]
    #3866791 - 03/04/05 09:10 AM (12 years, 7 months ago)

I smoke lots of DMT i'd tell you that rocks think.

Everything is.


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sadsappysucker said:
i want to ram my fat dick in hankys pooper




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OfflineFirstAvailable
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Re: Can plants think? New research opens a window to the minds of plants [Re: Madweed420shroom]
    #3866833 - 03/04/05 09:31 AM (12 years, 7 months ago)

Yea, WIRED is a pretty credible source. They had a good article a while back on a new treatment for opiate addiction.


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Offlineagr8fulchick
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Re: Can plants think? New research opens a window to the minds of plants [Re: HagbardCeline]
    #3866878 - 03/04/05 10:04 AM (12 years, 7 months ago)

We've known that plants are intelligent for a long time, we just can't figure out how it all works. Shows our limitations as humans! Many plants respond to pain (poking and cutting) as well as music (classical v. heavy metal) and such things. We'll figure it out someday, and then will the vegetarians think!?


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Life's a journey. Take the scenic route.

        :sun: :heart: :heart: :sun:


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Offlinebmarley3434
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Re: Can plants think? New research opens a window to the minds of plants [Re: agr8fulchick]
    #3867524 - 03/04/05 01:45 PM (12 years, 7 months ago)

yes there is intelligence there its obvious.. reminds me of sheldrakes morphogenetic field.. but my questions are what is the root of this intelligence, what previously has came from that source of intelligence (language,technology or maybe every thought we ever have), and what can now be extracted from it at this present time such as technological advancements unknown to us(techno-shamanism.


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www.returntonature.us - wild foods blog


OM


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OfflineHagbardCeline
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Re: Can plants think? New research opens a window to the minds of plants [Re: FirstAvailable]
    #3868694 - 03/04/05 05:41 PM (12 years, 7 months ago)

It was only linked off of WIRED. The Christian Science Monitor was the source.


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I keep it real because I think it is important that a highly esteemed individual such as myself keep it real lest they experience the dreaded spontaneous non-existance of no longer keeping it real. - Hagbard Celine


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Invisiblezee_werp
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Re: Can plants think? New research opens a window to the minds of plants [Re: HagbardCeline]
    #3868951 - 03/04/05 06:32 PM (12 years, 7 months ago)

There was something similar mentioned in the book 'Supernature' by Lyall Watson, which was published sometime in the 60s or 70s as I recall.

What had happened was there was some guy who worked with lie detector equipment, those electronic sensors. He was doing a casual experiment on the rubber plant in his office when he had nothing much to do. He wanted to see if he could measure the rate at which the water traveled up the plant by attaching the sensors to a leaf. He did this and watered the plant but saw no changes in the graph. Then he decided to try dipping the leaf into a cup of hot water. Again, nothing.

At that point, he decided to try burning the plants leaf with a match. At the exact moment that he decided to burn it, the graph showed an abrupt and sustained change in activity.

So the story went on to describe how he went on to design an experiment around it, which had a few different elements. On of the ones I can remember was this one where they got everyone out of the room (to avoid any kind of interference) and they set up this little device beside the plant, which would drop live brine shrimp into boiling water right beside the plant. The crazy thing was they found that the plant would show a response each time a brine shrimp was killed, but if one that was already dead was dropped in, no response occured.

Anyway they went on to claim that the plant had even grown to recognise the dudes presence (the guy who first did the experiment on it).

I'm not sure if Lyall Watson is reputable or not, he sure does have a lot of books on 'pop science' type things out, but a lot of the stories in them seem kind of far out.


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Offlinebmarley3434
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Re: Can plants think? New research opens a window to the minds of plants [Re: zee_werp]
    #3869289 - 03/04/05 07:48 PM (12 years, 7 months ago)

the secret life of plants talks about just about every man and ever experiment they ever did on plants being conscious.. http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/0060915870/ref=sib_dp_pt/002-2490749-1110460#reader-link


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www.returntonature.us - wild foods blog


OM


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OfflineLocus
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Re: Can plants think? New research opens a window to the minds of plants [Re: HagbardCeline]
    #3872097 - 03/05/05 08:34 AM (12 years, 7 months ago)

yeah, it's interesting stuff, plants are cool :smile:


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The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing. One cannot help but be in awe when he contemplates the mysteries of eternity, of life, of the marvelous structure of reality. It is enough if one tries merely to comprehend a little of this mystery every day. Never lose a holy curiosity. ~ Albert Einstein
"Fear is the great barrier to human growth." ~ Dr. Robert Monroe



~~~*Dosis sola facit venenum*~~~

*Check my profile to listen to my music* :smile:


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Offlinedelta9
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Re: Can plants think? New research opens a window to the minds of plants [Re: zee_werp]
    #3872135 - 03/05/05 08:56 AM (12 years, 7 months ago)

Plants to Polygraphs, it was an experiment by Clive Backster in the 1960s.


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delta9


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