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Offlineprophesee
Stranger
Registered: 09/21/04
Posts: 61
Last seen: 12 years, 4 days
Essays for prints
    #3459026 - 12/07/04 12:00 PM (12 years, 6 days ago)

Hey who wants to write a (3) 1,000 word essays by wensday night? ill send prints and  This Watch :smile:.  This is a college level essay, but doesnt need to be great, it's only a sophomore class. Anyways the topic is teenage apathy, and one essay is a causal essay, on is a language essay, and one is a problem solution.


The Causal Argument  This assignment is rooted in chapter 8 of your textbook, in which causality is defined as referring to ?a relationship between events in which a later event somehow explains an earlier one? (499).  Your text also emphasizes that the claim must assert that one event caused or influenced another; in other words, it?s not a claim of existence, as your text explains in the comparison of the following two statements:  ?The king died and then the queen died,? and ?The king died, and so the queen died? (499).  Pay attention to this distinction as you write your claim and the argument that supports it. Your claim should mention the cause or causes you are nominating and/or suggest the significance of the cause.  A complete causal explanation will name several causes; each can then be taken up in turn in separate sections of your paper.  Your claim should also specify the most important cause. 

Also, be careful not to allow your claim to overstate the case that you actually make.  If you are calling for change, make sure that the argument involves a cause that can actually be changed.  Consider which parts of your claim can plausibly be assumed and which will need support.  Remember, as always, to keep your audience and purpose in mind as you shape your argument. 

There are some common structures for writing causal arguments, and they are listed below.  Your argument may take any of these forms or a combination of them. 
Structure 1. For detailing all the causal links in an event
? Introduction of topic/event to be discussed and the problem or controversy surrounding it
? Summarize your thesis: claim and main reasons (causes)
? Delineate each link in the chain of causality for your event and discuss how each link works with the others to produce the next effect as well as the eventual (final) effect. Remember to identify causes as remote/immediate, precipitating/contributing, or necessary/sufficient and to explain why they are labeled so.
? Conclude your argument by restating your thesis and summarizing the point(s) of your argument
Structure 2. For use when you wish to examine how a number of possible causes have contributed to an event or what different results may arise from different acts upon the same event. Explores a number of causes/consequences and tries to place a relative value on each.
? Introduction of topic/event to be discussed and the problem or controversy surrounding it
? Divide the body of your paper into separate section, each dealing with only one of the possible causes/consequences. Begin discussing the possible causes or possible consequences, and organizing your discussion with the most important causes/consequences first and the least important or most surprising last. Remember to identify causes as remote/immediate, precipitating/contributing, or necessary/sufficient and to explain why they are labeled so.
? Conclude your argument by restating your thesis and summarizing the point(s) of your argument
Structure 3. For explaining a cause/consequence that your audience will (or may) not expect, one they may find surprising; arguing for the unusual or extraordinary. Explores a number of causes/consequences and seeks to reject those the audience may accept as the most valid in favor of one that is more unusual or surprising.
? Introduction of topic/event to be discussed and the problem or controversy surrounding it
? Begin discussing the usual causes/consequences, the ones your audience is most likely to assume as causes/consequences. In a separate section devoted to each usual cause/consequence, explore and reject each one
? Introduce the more unusual cause/consequence that you feel is a valid one; argue for your choice by discussing why you feel that this cause/consequence is more valid than the usual ones.
? Conclude your argument by restating your thesis and summarizing the point(s) of your argument
Structure 4. When you wish to persuade your audience to change their minds about a particular, accepted cause/consequence. This is the most common argument structure.
? Introduction of topic/event to be discussed and the problem or controversy surrounding it
? Summarize and explain the causal argument put forward by the opposing side. Refute it.
? Introduce your own causal argument, discuss, and explain why the audience should consider your argument more valid than the one they are assumed to hold.
? Conclude your argument by restating your thesis and summarizing the point(s) of your argument
Note: your argument structure may also take the form of a combination of any of the above structures.
Here are some questions to ask about as you formulate your argument: 
? Will the opposition find any weaknesses in your explanation of the causal links?
? Will the opposition find any weaknesses in your use of empirical evidence? Will they question your interpretation of facts, statistics, and data? If you use a survey or experiment as evidence, will they question the findings, methods, or the design of the survey or experiment?
? Will the opposition argue that a relationship you have demonstrated between data and cause is weak or that you have not shown the existence of a causal link strongly enough? Might there be exceptions to the relationship you have tried to establish? Might there be other possibilities of cause that you have not mentioned?
? Will the opposition argue that the relative weight given to the causes in your chain should be different?
Let these peer-review questions guide you as you finalize your argument: 

? Has the causal argument maintained a clear, consistent audience and purpose?  Who is the audience, and what is the purpose of the argument?  Does the argument do anything that might confuse or alienate this audience, such as assuming familiarity with a subject that its audience is not acquainted with or spending too much time explaining a common occurrence?  Does the purpose seem to vary through the course of the argument?  If so, how should the purpose be made more consistent? 

? Will the audience agree that the effect exists?  If an event, a condition, or a trend is the subject of the investigation, will the audience agree that such an effect is real? 

? Does the arguer provide an appropriate structural framework?  Which framework or model is the arguer using?  Does it work with the subject and purpose of the investigation?  Why or why not?  If not, what other choice might be better?

? Will the audience agree that agency is believable--that there is a connection between the cause and the effect?  Does the arguer assume agency?  If so, is that assumption appropriate--does the assumption of agency agree with natural or physical laws or with a typical view of human nature?  If not, is the claim for agency plausibly supported?  If not, how could it be? 

? Is there enough support to convince the audience that a particular cause operated as claimed?  How is the argument supported?  Do you see any areas where the support is weak?  How might it be strengthened?  Does any piece of supporting evidence fail to convince you?  What can be done to make it more convincing?  Are any pieces of evidence missing? 

? Are there any obvious problems with the argument that would make it easy to refute?  Does the arguer ignore something obvious?  Is there a problem in the argument?s logic?  If so, what can be done to solve the problem? 

? Is the argument clear and effectively organized?  Does the argument move in a logical manner from beginning to end?  What might be done differently to make the causal argument more effective?


The Language Argument.  This assignment is rooted in chapter 9, in which the following information is found: 

Some disputes in a community may arise over the meaning of words.  Other disputes may revolve around deciding what language is appropriate for the community . . . Claims
about how language should be used are closely related to claims about experience and
claims about value and will usually be supported by reasons that are statements about
experience or about values. . . Arguments about language use are not just about individual
words; they are about metaphors as well. 

This assignment asks you to discuss and understand the language, jargon, terminology, labels, and metaphors surrounding LSU?s Flagship Agenda. This will be accomplished by examining documents within the LSU community as well as local articles from local newspapers.  It also might involve researching other Flagship universities.  Identify the troublesome terms within this discourse community, and consider their denotations and connotations.  Any and all of the key concepts covered in chapter 9 come into play in this assignment, including denotation, connotation, euphemism, doublespeak, synonyms, criteria and match, formal definition, etymology, operational definition, and negation. 

Any of the essays in chapter 9 may be used as structural templates. 



The Problem Solution Argument  This assignment is rooted in chapter 11, and it requires you to identify and isolate one problem within the area of the Flagship Agenda.  You may approach this two ways:  Either identify a problem in the LSU community and argue for a solution within the Flagship Agenda or identify a problem within the Flagship Agenda and argue for a feasible solution.  What you may not do is claim the Flagship Agenda as a whole as a solution to a sweeping problem within this University.  The steps are to 1) analyze the problem, 2) analyze possible solution, and 3) identify how the action or actions will be carried out.  These items are discussed in your textbook on page 713.


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OfflineProdijal_Son
slowmaster

Registered: 07/20/02
Posts: 1,573
Loc: derby city
Last seen: 7 years, 8 months
Re: Essays for prints [Re: prophesee]
    #3459065 - 12/07/04 12:13 PM (12 years, 6 days ago)

I'm afraid cold hard cash would be the only meduim suitable for trade here. 3,000 words is like 6 pages. That's some work. I just now saw the watch. Anyways, the time you spent on making this post you could have written a page.


Edited by Prodijal_Son (12/07/04 12:14 PM)


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Invisiblegdman
badger, badger,badger...
Male User Gallery

Registered: 12/10/02
Posts: 16,286
Loc: Dancing In the Streets
Re: Essays for prints [Re: prophesee]
    #3459094 - 12/07/04 12:23 PM (12 years, 6 days ago)

:lol: that's funny, seriously I think you should do your own work, especilly if it's a small class and you have written papers for them before.


--------------------


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Offlinestefan
work in progress

Registered: 04/11/01
Posts: 8,932
Loc: The Netherlands
Last seen: 10 days, 21 hours
Re: Essays for prints [Re: prophesee]
    #3459266 - 12/07/04 01:11 PM (12 years, 6 days ago)

haha do your own homework man :wink:

if you don't feel like doing anything just drop out


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InvisibleHeavyToilet
The Heaviest OfThem All
Male

Registered: 08/06/03
Posts: 9,458
Loc: British Columbia
Re: Essays for prints [Re: prophesee]
    #3459652 - 12/07/04 02:50 PM (12 years, 5 days ago)

Not having to write essays is a priceless thing.

A price cannot be put on it.


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