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InvisibleSkorpivoMusterion
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Children's Intrinsic Wisdom
    #3150247 - 09/18/04 12:12 AM (13 years, 11 days ago)

Characteristics of Being-Cognition and Deficiency-Cognition of the World:

State of Being: B-Cognition. [Spiritual]

State of Deficiency: D-Cognition. [Egoic]

B-Cognition

1.) Seen as whole, as complete, self-sufficient, as unitary, Either Cosmic Consciousness, in which whole cosmos is perceived as single thing with oneself belonging in it; or else the person, object, or portion of the world seen is seen as if it were the whole world, i.e., rest of the world is forgotten. Integrative perceiving of unities. Unity of the world or object perceived.

D-Cognition

1.) Seen as part , as incomplete, not self-sufficient, as dependent upon other things.

______

B-Cognition

2.) Exclusively, fully narrowly attended to; absorption, fascination, focal attention; total attention. Tends to de-differentiate figure and ground. Richness of detail; seen from many sides. Seen with ?care,? totally, intensely, with complete investment. Totally cathected. Relative importance becomes unimportant; all aspects equally important.

D-Cognition

2.) Attended to with simultaneous attention to all cause that is relevant. Sharp figure-ground  differentiation. Seen imbedded in relationships to all else in world, as part of the world. Rubricized; seen from some aspects only; selective attention and selective inattention to some aspects; seen casually, seen only from some point of view.

______

B-Cognition

3.) No comparing [in Dorothy Lee?s sense]. Seen per se, in itself, by itself. Not in competition with anything else. Sole member of the class (in Hartman?s sense).


D-Cognition

3.) Placing on a continuum or within a series; comparing, judging, evaluating. Seen as a member of a class, as an instance, a sample.

______

B-Cognition

4.) Human-irrelevant.

D-Cognition

4.) Relevant to human concerns; e.g., what good is it, what can it be used for, is it good for or dangerous to people, etc.

______

B-Cognition

5.) Made richer by repeated experiencing. More and more perceived. ?Intra-object richness.?

D-Cognition

5.) Repeated experiencing impoverishes, reduces richness, makes it less interesting and attractive, takes away its demand-character. Familiarization leads to boredom.

______

B-Cognition

6.) Seen as unneeded, as purposeless, as not desired, as unmotivated perceiving. Perceived as if it had no reference to the needs of the perceiver. Can therefore be seen as independent, in its own right.

D-Cognition

6.) Motivated perceiving. Object seen as need-gratifier, as useful or not useful.

______

B-Cognition

7.) Object-centering. Self-forgetful, ego-transcending, unselfish, disinterested. Therefore, it-centered. Identification and fusion of perceiver and perceived. So absorbed into the experience that self disappears, so that whole experience can be organized around the object itself as a centering point or organizing point. Object uncontaminated and unconfused with self. Abnegation of the perceiver.

D-Cognition

7.) Organized around ego as a centering point, which means projection of the ego into the percept. Perception not of the object alone but of the object-mixed-with-the-self-of-the-perciever.
______

B-Cognition

8.) The object is permitted to be itself. Humble, receptive, passive, choiceless, undemanding. Taoistic, nonintereference with the object or percept. Let-be acceptance.

D-Cognition

8.) Active shaping, organizing, and selecting by the perceiver. He shifts it, rearranges it. He works at it. This must be more fatiguing than B-cognizing, which probably is fatigue-curing. Trying, striving, effort, Will, control.
______

B-Cognition

9.) Seen as end in itself, self-validating. Self-justifying. Intrinsically interesting for its own sake. Has intrinsic value.

D-Cognition

9.) A means, an instrument, not having self-contained worth but having only exchangeable value, or standing for something else, or a ticket to some other place.
______

B-Cognition

10.) Outside of time and space. Seen as eternal, universal. ?A minute is a day; a day is a minute.? Disorientation of perceiver in time and space, not conscious of surroundings. Percept not related to surroundings. Ahistorical.


D-Cognition

10.) In time and space. Temporal. Seen in history, and in the physical world.
______

B-Cognition

11.) The characteristics of Being are perceived as values of Being.

D-Cognition

11.) D-Values are means-values, i.e., usefulness, desirability-undesirability, suitability for a purpose. Evaluations, comparisons, condemnations, approvals, or disapprovals, judgments upon.

______

B-Cognition

12.) Absolute [because time-less and spaceless, because detached from the ground, because taken per se, because rest of world and history all forgotten]. This is compatible with the perception of process and shifting, alive organizations within the perceptions ? but it is strictly within the perception.


D-Cognition

12.) Relative to history, to culture, to characterology, to local values, to the interests and needs of man. It is felt to be passing. Depends on man for its reality; if man were to disappear, it would disappear. Shifting from one syndrome to another as a whole, i.e., it is now a bit in this syndrome, now a bit in that syndrome.

______

B-Cognition

13.) Resolution of dichotomies, polarities, conflicts. Inconsistencies seen to exist simultaneously and to be sensible and necessary, i.e., to be seen as a higher unity or integration, or under a superordinate whole.


D-Cognition

13.) Aristotelean logic, i.e., separate things seen as dissected and cut off and quite different from each other, mutually exclusive, often with antagonistic interests.

______

B-Cognition

14.) Concretely [and abstractly] perceived. All aspects at once. Therefore ineffable [to ordinary language]; describable, if at all, by poetry, art, etc., but even this will make sense only to one who has already had same experience. Essentially aesthetic experience [in Northrop?s sense]. Nonchoosing preferring or selecting. Seen in its suchness [different from the concrete perception of young children, of primitive adults, or of brain-injured people because it coexists with abstract ability].

D-Cognition

14.) Only abstract, categorized, diagrammatic, rubricized, schematized. Classifying. ?Reduction to the abstract.?

______

B-Cognition

15.) The idiographic object; the concrete, unique instance. Classification impossible [except for abstracted aspects] because sole member of its class.


D-Cognition

15.) Nomothetic, general, statistical lawfulness.

______

B-Cognition

16.) Increase of dynamic isomorphism between inner and outer worlds. As the essential Being of the world is perceived by the person, so also does he concurrently become closer to his own Being, and vice versa.


D-Cognition

16.) Decreased isomorphism.

______


B-Cognition

17.) Object often perceived as sacred, holy, ?very special.? It ?demands? or ?calls for? awe, reverence, piety, wonder.

D-Cognition

17.) Object ?normal,? every-day, ordinary, familiar, nothing special, ?familiarized away.?

______


B-Cognition

18.) World and self [not always] seen as amusing, playful, comic, funny, absurd, laughable; but also as poignant. Laughter [which is close to tears]. Philosophical humor. World, person, child, etc., seen as cute, absurd, charming, lovable. May produce mixed laughing-crying. Fusion of comic-tragic dichotomy.

D-Cognition

18.) Lesser forms of humor, if seen at all. Serious things quite different from amusing things. Hostile humor, humorlessness. Solemnity.

______


B-Cognition

19.) Noninterchangeable. Not replaceable. No one else will do.



D-Cognition

19.) Interchangeable. Replaceable.




In innocence; i.e., to the innocent, everything moves toward becoming equally probable; everything is equally important; everything is equally interesting. The best way to try to understand this is to see it through the eyes of the child. For instance, to the child the word importance doesn?t mean anything at first. That which catches the eye, anything that glitters or happens to strike the eye by accident is as important as anything else. There seems to be only rudimentary structuring and differentiation of the environment [what comes forward as figure and what recedes into the background as ground].

If one expects nothing, if one has no anticipations or apprehensions, if in a certain sense there is no future, because the child is moving totally ?here-now,? there can be no surprise, no disappointment. One thing is as likely as another to happen. This is ?perfect waiting,? and spectatorship without any demands that one thing happen rather than another. There is no prognosis. And no prediction means no worry, no anxiety, no apprehension or foreboding. Any child?s reaction to pain, for instance, is total, without inhibition, without control of any kind. The whole organism goes into a yell of pain and rage. Partly this can be understood as a concrete reaction to the concrete here-now moment. This is possible because there is no expectation of the future, hence no preparation for the future, no rehearsal or anticipation. Neither is there any eagerness when the future is unknown. [?I can?t wait]. There is certainly no impatience.

In the child there is a total unquestioning acceptance of whatever happens. Since there is also very little memory, very little leaning on the past, there is little tendency in the child to bring the past into the present or into the future. The consequence is that the child is totally here-now, or totally innocent one could say, or totally without past or future. These are all ways of defining further concrete perception, B-cognition [of the child], and also the occasional B-cognition of the sophisticated adult who has managed to achieve the ?second na?vet?.?

This is all related to my conception of the creative personality as one who is totally here-now, one who lives without the future or past. Another way of saying this: ?The creative person is an innocent.? An innocent could be defined as a grown person who can still perceive, or think, or react like a child. It is this innocence that is recovered in the ?second na?vet?,? or perhaps I will call it the ?second innocence? of the wise old man who has managed to recover the ability to be childlike.

Innocence on the behavioral side is unself-conscious spontaneity when absorbed or fascinated; i.e., lack of self-awareness, which means loss of self or transcendence of it. Then behavior is totally organized by fascination with the interesting world outside the self, which then means ?not trying to have an effect on the onlooker,? without guile or design, without even being aware that one is an object of scrutiny. The behavior is purely experience and not a means to some interpersonal end.

Thank you for taking the time to read this. :heart:


--------------------
Coffee should be black as hell, strong as death, and sweet as love.


Edited by SkorpivoMusterion (09/18/04 12:59 AM)


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OfflineStinky
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Registered: 08/31/04
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Re: Children's Intrinsic Wisdom [Re: SkorpivoMusterion]
    #3150321 - 09/18/04 12:40 AM (13 years, 11 days ago)

Very interesting post. This makes me want to go back to the days of my childhood knowing how much I should cherish it. Of course that is a contradiction... if I could be aware of how much importance my child-like spontaneity and innocence held, it wouldn't be the real thing. Its a real bitch of a paradox. I'm looking forward to my golden days of "second innocence" though.


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InvisibleSkorpivoMusterion
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Re: Children's Intrinsic Wisdom [Re: Stinky]
    #3152559 - 09/19/04 12:32 AM (13 years, 10 days ago)

if I could be aware of how much importance my child-like spontaneity and innocence held, it wouldn't be the real thing.

If by the 'real thing' you mean unadulterated child-like innocence and creativity, then yes perhaps you could say that. However, I would say that such intrinsic qualities are enhanced when one also possesses higher intelligence and deeper maturity as well. It's just a shame some people who have gained that particular end of that spectrum, lose sight and forget the other end of the spectrum, and end up spending a substantial amount of their energy and life vehemently substituting for such deficiencies.

I would like to point out in relation to this subject, why I enjoy indulging in hallucinogenic mushrooms. The one major reason I love to engage in psychedelic trips is that it forces me into the Now -- the intensely alive state that is free of time, free of problems, free of mundane mechanical thinking, free of the burden of personality, and so on -- depending on the strength of dosage, of course.
It's truly such a mystifying and enriching experience to fully bring forth that inner energy that is obscured by the ego when sober and 'spiritually unconscious', which creates such an awe of everything around me, just like that of a child as I described above. Time almost seems to slow down to a halt, everything becomes magnified in detail, I delve into intense and absolute utter fascination into even the smallest of a single object, colors become more bright and vibrant, energy can be felt within and without, a glimpse of how the timeless can transform my perceptions takes place... I become aware of something invisible that I feel is the essence of that tree, its inner spirit. Somehow I feel that I am a part of that. I realize now that I hadn't truly seen the tree before, just a flat and dead image of it.
When in such psychedelic trips, I feel inner-intense JOY emanating from within.. of almost tear-inducing magnitude. It brings out the Being-cognition within me. This, is what I love, about the experience of shrooms.

However, in respect of balance, allow me to clarify that I don't advocate the dependency of such external sources to bring out what is already inherently yours and you. This state of enlightenment can be achieved, right here and Now, from within.

:heart:


--------------------
Coffee should be black as hell, strong as death, and sweet as love.


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