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OfflineMystiq_Shaman
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Registered: 07/10/04
Posts: 404
Loc: North Calotte
Last seen: 12 years, 1 month
Ledum palustre (marsh tea)
    #2943793 - 07/30/04 09:13 AM (12 years, 4 months ago)

I was searching for plants that can be used for insect bits when i came across this plant. The description says it has a strong smell and taste. It also say that vikings used it when they brewed beer to make it stronger. And that in larger amounts have hallucinating effects. This plant grows everywhere here. So i figured it would be worth more research.

I was thinking if they brewed it in beer, did the beer have hallucinating effects. Maybe you can make extract. And then you have the safety about ingesting this plant.


So does anyone know anything about the use of this plant?



Edited by Mystiq_Shaman (07/31/04 12:45 PM)


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OfflineAneglakya
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Re: Ledum palustre - need info [Re: Mystiq_Shaman]
    #2943861 - 07/30/04 10:00 AM (12 years, 4 months ago)

We need to knwo the active constituents and their solubility. This is pretty interesting.

I have found numerous references to Clary Sage (salvia sclearea) having strong sedative/narcotic affects. They would also add it to beer to increase the intoxicating effects. I have some of the essential oil but haven't done much more than enjoy the aroma.


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OfflineMystiq_Shaman
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Registered: 07/10/04
Posts: 404
Loc: North Calotte
Last seen: 12 years, 1 month
Re: Ledum palustre - need info [Re: Aneglakya]
    #2943903 - 07/30/04 10:44 AM (12 years, 4 months ago)

I found out the common name is wild rosemary.

homeopathic use of ledum : http://www.abchomeopathy.com/r.php/Led
plant profile: http://plants.usda.gov/cgi_bin/plant_profile.cgi?symbol=LEPAD

---
INTRODUCTION

Ledum palustre L. subsp. decumbens (Ait.) Hulton is treated as a synonym of Ledum palustre (Ait.) Lodd (1). It has been found in Asia, Europe and North America. The leaf of Ledum palustre subsp. decumbens is used in traditional Chinese medicine for infection and inflammation. It was once added to their beer to make it more intoxicating by German. The leaves are also used as marsh tea, which is considered abortifacient, diaphoretic, diuretic, emetic, expectorant, lactagogue, narcotic, pectoral and vulnerary. It is also used as a remedy for arthrosis, bronchitis, bug bites, chest ailments, cold, cough, dysentery, dyspepsia, eruptions, fever, gout, itch, leprosy, malignancies, rheumatism, sore throat and whitlows. Korean use the leaves to treat female disorders. Homeopaths use them for acne, gout, intercostal neuralgia, rheumatism and skin ailments (2). The sprouts of Ledum palustre shows bacteriostatic activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which is freshly isolated from drug-resistant and drug sensitive patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis forms and against laboratory strains. The infusions of Ledum palustre enhance the bacteriostatic properties of antituberculous drugs, as evidenced by a high efficiency in treated animals. It may be used in the multi-modality treatment of patients with tuberculosis (3). Ledum palustre L. extract can increase the survival rate of lethal dose irradiation on mice, thus has radioprotective effect (4). The extract of Ledum palustre and Archangelica officinalis protects the experimental animals from the injury to both the gastrointestinal tract and the hemopoietic system (5). The extract protects reproductive capacity of male mice from gamma-radiation to give normal offsprings (6). Raw material from the plants may be used to produce antitussive and expectorant drugs (7). The essential oil of Ledum palustre, both from Siberian and European, shows anti-inflammatory effect (8). More than 70 compounds were isolated from the essential oil of Ledum palustre (9), including new terpenoids lepalox (p-mentha-18,10-dien-3,9-oxide), lepaxone (3,10-hydroxygermacr-4 (14)-en-8-one) (10), and bicyclo-(2.1.0)-hex-3-en-5-isopropyl-2-one (11). Coumarin glucosides, esculetin 6-O-beta-D-[6'(3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl)] glucoside, fraxin and esculin were isolated from the aerial parts of Ledum palustre (12). Since a preliminary antifungal test on the MeOH extract of Ledum palustre L. subsp. decumbens (Ait) Hulton showed reasonable activity, to identifiy the bioactive ingredients, the 70% MeOH extract of the leaves was chromatographed and the structures of the purified compounds were elucidated mainly by one and two-dimensional NMR experiments. Compound 1 is a new natural product, the known compound 2, is reported from a natural source for the first time. Both compounds exhibited antifungal activity against pathogenic moldes and yeasts, as well as a reasonable cytotoxic activity against KB cells.

Read the whole thing here: http://www1.tums.ac.ir/daru/Daru4Volume7No4_1999/Danesh.htm


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OfflineAneglakya
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Re: Ledum palustre - need info [Re: Mystiq_Shaman]
    #2943945 - 07/30/04 11:05 AM (12 years, 4 months ago)

Very cool.

I would like to say though.. that when researching a plant, if you find Homeopathic uses .. dont take them too seriously because they use a tiny tiny amount and there usually isn't much science (if any ) to back it up at all. Go with the hard data and facts.. use the Lore as a means to investigate the science though, for instance, if you hear that shamans are powdering magnolia leaves and snorting them as a 'mild dope' , find out what alkaloids are in magnolia.. then move on to study the pharmacology of said alkaloids.. then maybe check the merck and try to make an extraction. Be sure you are 100% aware of any toxicity involved here before you even consider bioassay... bioassay can be very dangerous for the misinformed.


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OfflineMystiq_Shaman
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Registered: 07/10/04
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Re: Ledum palustre - need info [Re: Aneglakya]
    #2947918 - 07/31/04 11:18 AM (12 years, 4 months ago)

yeah :smile: Thanks for the advice. I know nothing about homeopathic medicine.
Note; wild rosemary is also the common name for Rosmarinus officinalis often used in aromatherapy.

I found this poem about this plant on some webpage :smile:

The Marsh-tea flower
Mist floats over the marsh
and borders disappear
making everything seem close together.
The intoxinating scent of the marsh-tea flower
makes the elves dance.

-----------------
Trapper's tea (Ledum gladulosum) is similar in most respects to L. gorenlandicum, but is easily differentiated byits whitish-hairy (vs. rusty-hairy in L. groenlandicum) leaf undersides. Both species occupy similary habitats; Labrador tea (L. groenlandicum) is the common species in Alaska, B.C. and western Washington, and trapper';s tea is the common species in the Washington Cascades and Oregon, where it occurs from the coast to high in the mountains. Trapper's tea is known to be toxic in concentrated doses, but interior peoples use this species as a beverage tea, apparently without ill effect.
Northern Labrador tea (Ledum palustre spp. decumbens, also known as L. decumbens) is a smaller, sprawling to erect shrub with reddish hairs on stems, leaf undersides and flowers...
All three contain toxic alkaloids known to be poisonous to livestock, especially sheep...
It [the tea] is said to be relaxing, and for some people, to cause drowsiness, possibly due to the potentially toxic glycosides present in the leaves. Others feel no such effects from it or find it prevents drowsiness."
----------

L. PALUSTRE (Marsh Tea, Marsh Cistus,Wild Rosemary, Wild Rosmarin, Rosmarinus Sylvestris [This species is used in Homeopathy.- EDITOR.], Porsch, Sumpfporsch, Finne Th?) grows in swamps and wet places of northern Europe, Asia, and America, and on the mountains of southern districts. The leaves are reputed to be more powerful than those of L. latifolium, and to have in addition some narcotic properties, being used in Germany to make beer more intoxicating. The leaves contain a volatile oil, including ledum camphor, a stearopten, with valeric and volatile acids, ericolin, and ericinol. The tannin is called leditannic acid.
------------------
http://plantsdatabase.com/b/Ericaceae/Ledum/
^^^
Ok, I have some confusion when it comes to the common name marsh tea. plantsdatabase.com calls it wild rosemary and calls Ledum groenlandicum for marsh tea and also swamp tea and Labrador Tea.

Lots of people, many kids, on northern reservations here and west into Montana, can show you what they call "swamp tea" though there are two different plants that different kids will show you. Only one of these is what was the traditional swamp tea, Muskeegobug, Ledum glandulosum, or Laborador Tea as its main common English name. The other was known as Odigadimanido, a special gift of the spirit or Manido powers. That's Ceanothus ovatus, or New Jersey Tea in its common English name.
http://www.kstrom.net/isk/food/swamp.html
-------------------







Edited by Mystiq_Shaman (07/31/04 01:05 PM)


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InvisibleStonehenge
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Re: Ledum palustre - need info [Re: Mystiq_Shaman]
    #2948605 - 07/31/04 03:06 PM (12 years, 4 months ago)

I just saw live rosemary plants in the grocery store. I almost bought one. It was pretty expensive though, a whole $1.69 for a good sized healthy plant. I like the smell. I don't know, I might pick one up.


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OfflineAneglakya
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Re: Ledum palustre - need info [Re: Stonehenge]
    #2948660 - 07/31/04 03:16 PM (12 years, 4 months ago)

They are extremely common. We have a lot in our garden. We grill our chicken with it. Very yummy.


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InvisibleStonehenge
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Re: Ledum palustre - need info [Re: Aneglakya]
    #2949368 - 07/31/04 06:04 PM (12 years, 4 months ago)

Does anyone use it to get high besides vikings?


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OfflineMystiq_Shaman
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Registered: 07/10/04
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Re: Ledum palustre - need info [Re: Stonehenge]
    #2949884 - 07/31/04 09:59 PM (12 years, 4 months ago)

my conclusion so far is that this plant most likely dont have any recreational value, but it is still very intresting and i am going to do more research on it, and post what i find intresting here.

it seems it was the teutonic, not the vikings, that used this in their beer (small detail).

I asked my grandmother about this plant and she told me that fishermen used this plant as a tobacco replacement (it can be found on small islands up the coast here) when the urge for tobacco was big and there was no tobacco around.

looking for taxonomy report of this plant but it is not easy to find


Edited by Mystiq_Shaman (08/02/04 08:29 AM)


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OfflineMystiq_Shaman
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Registered: 07/10/04
Posts: 404
Loc: North Calotte
Last seen: 12 years, 1 month
Re: Ledum palustre - need info [Re: Mystiq_Shaman]
    #2974771 - 08/07/04 08:05 AM (12 years, 3 months ago)

well dudelidoo after careful asking people around here i found out that one person still use it combined with alcohol at least :laugh:

he told me he have addet this plant together with other herbs in the "wine" (yeast, sugar and water(i dont know the english word for this)) you setup before distilling alcohol.

I have picked 2 lbs of this plant also.

more info to come.. :wink:


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