Home | Community | Message Board


Gaiana.nl
Please support our sponsors.

Mushrooms, Mycology and Psychedelics >> The Ethnobotanical Garden

Welcome to the Shroomery Message Board! You are experiencing a small sample of what the site has to offer. Please login or register to post messages and view our exclusive members-only content. You'll gain access to additional forums, file attachments, board customizations, encrypted private messages, and much more!

Shop: Bridgetown Botanicals CBD Edibles, CBD Oils, CBD Topicals   North Spore North Spore Mushroom Grow Kits & Cultivation Supplies   Original Sensible Seeds Autoflowering Cannabis Seeds, Bulk Cannabis Seeds, Feminized Cannabis Seeds, High THC Strains, USA West Coast Strains   Kraken Kratom Red Vein Kratom   PhytoExtractum Kratom Powder for Sale, Maeng Da Thai Kratom Leaf Powder   Amazon Dehydrator, Scales

Jump to first unread post. Pages: 1
InvisibleLifeUnderAwno
I'm a teapot

Registered: 07/04/16
Posts: 669
Loc: growing out of perlite
Asimina triloba - ITS PAW PAW SEASON! Largest Native Fruit of The Eastern United States
    #26850142 - 07/28/20 05:26 PM (14 days, 15 hours ago)

:kratomtee: :awehigh: :Awemush:





https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asimina_triloba




A. triloba is a large shrub or small tree growing to a height of 35 ft (11 m), rarely as tall as 45 ft (14 m), with trunks 8–12 in (20–30 cm) or more in diameter. The large leaves of pawpaw trees are clustered symmetrically at the ends of the branches, giving a distinctive imbricated appearance to the tree's foliage.[9][18]

The leaves of the species are simple, alternate and spirally arranged, entire, deciduous, obovate-lanceolate, 10–12 in (25–30 cm) long, 4–5 in (10–13 cm) broad, and wedge-shaped at the base, with an acute apex and an entire margin, with the midrib and primary veins prominent. The petioles are short and stout, with a prominent adaxial groove. Stipules are lacking. The expanding leaves are conduplicate, green, covered with rusty tomentum beneath, and hairy above; when fully grown they are smooth, dark green above, and paler beneath. When bruised, the leaves have a disagreeable odor similar to a green bell pepper. In autumn, the leaves are a rusty yellow, allowing pawpaw groves to be spotted from a long distance.[6][9][18]

Pawpaw flowers are perfect, about 1–2 in (3–5 cm) across, rich red-purple or maroon when mature, with three sepals and six petals. They are borne singly on stout, hairy, axillary peduncles. The flowers are produced in early spring at the same time as or slightly before the new leaves appear, and have a faint fetid or yeasty smell.[6][9][18][19]
Fruit

The fruit of the pawpaw is a large, yellowish-green to brown berry, 2–6 in (5–15 cm) long and 1–3 in (3–8 cm) broad, weighing from 0.7–18 oz (20–510 g), containing several brown or black seeds 1⁄2–1 in (15–25 mm) in diameter embedded in the soft, edible fruit pulp. The conspicuous fruits begin developing after the plants flower; they are initially green, maturing by September or October to yellow or brown. When mature, the heavy fruits bend the weak branches down.




Conservation status

On a global (range-wide) scale, the common pawpaw (A. triloba) has a NatureServe global conservation rank of G5 (very common). In the United States, the species has an N5 (very common), but is considered a threatened species in |New York, and an endangered species in New Jersey. In Canada, where the species is found only in portions of southern Ontario, it has a rank of N3 (vulnerable), and a NatureServe subnational conservation rank of S3 (vulnerable) in Ontario. The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources has given the species a general status of "Sensitive", and its populations there are monitored.

In areas in which deer populations are dense, pawpaws appear to be becoming more abundant locally, since the deer avoid them, but consume seedlings of most other woody plants.

In cultivation, lack of successful pollination is the most common cause of poor fruiting. Cultivation is best in hardiness zones 5-9[5] and trees take 7-8 years from seedling to fruiting. Cross-pollination of at least two different genetic varieties of the plant is recommended,[6] and growers often resort to hand pollination or to use of pollinator attractants such as spraying fish emulsion or hanging chicken necks or other meat near the open flowers to attract pollinators. While pawpaws are larval hosts for the zebra swallowtail butterfly, these caterpillars are usually present only at low density, and not detrimental to the foliage of the trees.[27]

Pawpaws have never been cultivated for their fruits on the scale of apples or peaches, primarily because pawpaw fruits ripen to the point of fermentation soon after they are picked, and only frozen fruit stores or ships well. Other methods of preservation include dehydration, production of jams or jellies, and pressure canning (using the numerical values for bananas).

Cultivation of pawpaws for fruit production has attracted interest, particularly among organic growers, as a fruit with few to no pests that can successfully be grown in its native environment without pesticides. The commercial cultivation and harvesting of pawpaws is strong in southeastern Ohio[38] and also being explored in Kentucky[6] and Maryland,[28] as well as various areas outside the species' native range, including California,[27] the Pacific Northwest,[27] and Massachusetts.[39] The pawpaw is also gaining in popularity among landscapers and backyard gardeners because of the tree's distinctive growth habit, the appeal of its fresh fruit, and its relatively low maintenance needs once established.[19]
Propagation
An indoor A. triloba plant just a few days after the first signs on life became visible from the top soil; it could be 'Mango' or 'Taytwo' variety.
A young, pot-grown A. triloba tree sprouting from the soil, showing the large, heavy seed being lifted by the young stem

Trees are easily grown from seed. It is easiest to simply plant an entire fruit in the ground or place a seed in the ground immediately upon eating the fruit. Seeds should not be dried out, as they lose viability if they dehydrate to 5% moisture.[40] The seeds need to be stratified by moist cold storage for 60-100 days at 35–45 °F (2–7 °C) (some publications suggest 90-120 days).[40][36][35] They will lose their viability if stored for 3 years or more; some seeds survive if stored for 2 years. Germination is hypogeal and cotyledons remain within the seed coat. Strictly speaking, hypogeal means the cotyledons stay in the soil, acting as a food store for the seedling until the plumule emerges from the soil on the epicotyl or true stem. However, pawpaw seeds have occasionally been observed to emerge from the ground and form the true stem and plumule above ground.

Propagation using cuttings has generally not been successful.[40][36]

Desirable cultivars are propagated by chip budding or whip grafting onto a root stock. Pawpaw seeds do not grow "true to type" — each individual seed in a fruit is genetically different from the others and from its parent tree. Purchased cultivars do not produce seeds true to type, either, which is why cultivars are all grafted trees. Root sucker seedlings, however, are all genetically identical to their host.[36][35]

Commercial nurseries usually ship seedlings in containers, usually grafted cultivars, but other nurseries such as the Kentucky Division of Forestry ship bareroot seedlings for reforestation projects and area homeowners.[41][35]

Harvesting seedlings from the forest floor is tricky because most forest-floor seedlings are actually root suckers with few roots, and those seedlings that did grow from a seed have deep taproots.[36][35]

Blowflies, such as C. vomitoria, are known pollinators of these plants.


===

Fruits

As described by horticulturist Barbara Damrosch, the fruit of the pawpaw "looks a bit like mango, but with pale yellow, custardy, spoonable flesh and black, easy-to-remove seeds."[39] Wild-collected pawpaw fruits, ripe in late August to mid-September, have long been a favorite treat throughout the tree's extensive native range in eastern North America, and on occasion are sold locally at farmers' markets.[6][39] Pawpaw fruits have a sweet, custard-like flavor somewhat similar to banana, mango, and cantaloupe,[6][9] varying significantly by source or cultivar,[6] with more protein than most fruits.[6] Nineteenth-century American agronomist E. Lewis Sturtevant described pawpaws as

    ... a natural custard, too luscious for the relish of most people[28]

Ohio botanist William B. Werthner noted that

    The fruit ... has a tangy wild-wood flavor peculiarly its own. It is sweet, yet rather cloying to the taste and a wee bit puckery [9]

Fresh fruits of the pawpaw are commonly eaten raw, either chilled or at room temperature. However, they can be kept only 2–3 days at room temperature, or about a week if refrigerated.[19] The easily bruised pawpaw fruits do not ship well unless frozen.[6][39] Where pawpaws grow, the fruit pulp is also often used locally in baked dessert recipes, with pawpaw often substituted with volumetric equivalency in many banana-based recipes. Pawpaws may also be blended into ice cream[19] or included in pancakes.[19]


Nutrition

According to a report from the KSU Pawpaw Program (right table), raw pawpaw (with skin) in a 100-g amount provides 80 Calories and is a rich source (20% or more of the Daily Value, DV) of vitamin C (22% DV), magnesium (32% DV), iron (54% DV), and manganese (124% DV). The fruit also contains a moderate amount (119% DV) of vitamin A.
Phytochemicals
Zebra swallowtail butterflies (Eurytides marcellus) with pawpaw foliage

Phytochemical extracts of the leaves and fruit contain acetogenins, including the neurotoxin annonacin.[45] The seeds and bark contain the chemical asimitrin[46] and other acetogenins, including asimin, asiminacin and asiminecin.[45][47]
Effect on insects

Due to the presence of acetogenins, the leaves, twigs, and bark of pawpaw trees can be used to make an organic insecticide.[26] The one notable exception is the zebra swallowtail butterfly (Eurytides marcellus), whose larvae feed on the leaves of various species of Asimina, conferring protection from predation throughout the butterflies' lives, as trace amounts of acetogenins remain present, making them unpalatable to birds and other predators.[29]
Historical uses


The tough, fibrous inner bark of the pawpaw was used by Native Americans and settlers in the Midwest for making ropes, fishing nets, mats,[9][28] and for stringing fish.[10]

Pawpaw logs have been used for split-rail fences in Arkansas.[9]

The hard, brown, shiny lima-bean-sized seeds were sometimes carried as pocket pieces in Ohio.[9]

=====================================================================

Pawpaw are awesome trees.

Plant a few in your yard and moist drainage areas today! 

Especially if you live in an area where they are native but threatened.

B-E-A-U-T-I-F-U-L-!-!-!







With C. vomitoria, a pollinator








Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Offlineathos56
Stranger
 User Gallery


Registered: 06/13/20
Posts: 65
Last seen: 2 hours, 49 minutes
Re: Asimina triloba - ITS PAW PAW SEASON! Largest Native Fruit of The Eastern United States [Re: LifeUnderAwno] * 1
    #26850757 - 07/28/20 11:01 PM (14 days, 9 hours ago)

Wow, I've never heard of those.  They had me at fermentation. I wonder how a couple buckets would ferment out as a beverage or as the base for distillation?  Really cool!


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
OfflineCactusdan
Patecatl
Male User Gallery


Registered: 10/11/07
Posts: 7,024
Loc: Oregon
Last seen: 1 day, 6 hours
Re: Asimina triloba - ITS PAW PAW SEASON! Largest Native Fruit of The Eastern United States [Re: athos56] * 1
    #26851507 - 07/29/20 12:21 PM (13 days, 20 hours ago)

Jealous! I planted a few at an old rental about 6 years back, but have since left and feel weird sneaking back to see if there's any fruit

:sneakypeek:


--------------------




Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
InvisibleAllium
 User Gallery

Registered: 03/16/20
Posts: 1,735
Re: Asimina triloba - ITS PAW PAW SEASON! Largest Native Fruit of The Eastern United States [Re: Cactusdan] * 1
    #26851648 - 07/29/20 01:45 PM (13 days, 18 hours ago)

My kind of thread!

I have a huge stand of Pawpaw trees up the road from me,and every year I try to get fruits, but it's to no avail. Last year I manged to get one right before a dang squirrel got to it.

I have also tried everything to dig up suckers and transplant them at my house as well, and although I can get them to root, they never survive the winter.

I do have one single tree that survived the winter, but it's tiny and only has one set of leaves. It just wont grow.

Which reminds me, i need to get back out soon,and dig up some more. I'm going to get these to grow in my yard if it freaking kills me!

Anybody got any tips on how to keep these alive after transplanting them?


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
OfflineZifozonke
Stranger
 User Gallery

Registered: 03/24/19
Posts: 698
Last seen: 2 days, 16 hours
Re: Asimina triloba - ITS PAW PAW SEASON! Largest Native Fruit of The Eastern United States [Re: Allium] * 1
    #26851704 - 07/29/20 02:20 PM (13 days, 18 hours ago)

What a wonderful looking fruit
Never heard of this one before...
I love custard apples and these look remarkably similar
Hope maybe someday Ill get to try one
Thanks for sharing


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
InvisibleAllium
 User Gallery

Registered: 03/16/20
Posts: 1,735
Re: Asimina triloba - ITS PAW PAW SEASON! Largest Native Fruit of The Eastern United States [Re: Zifozonke] * 1
    #26851762 - 07/29/20 02:48 PM (13 days, 17 hours ago)

They actually have the texture of custard, hence a another name for them, the Custard Banana :cool:

I plan to battle those damn squirrels for a few this season, the cultivar here is so delicious :awesomenod:


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
OfflineCactusdan
Patecatl
Male User Gallery


Registered: 10/11/07
Posts: 7,024
Loc: Oregon
Last seen: 1 day, 6 hours
Re: Asimina triloba - ITS PAW PAW SEASON! Largest Native Fruit of The Eastern United States [Re: Allium]
    #26851906 - 07/29/20 03:59 PM (13 days, 16 hours ago)

They should germinate from seed pretty regularly if you're able to fend off the squirrels!

That being said, I think I've read they can take 8+ years to begin producing and are trioecious (male, female, and hermaphroditic flowers) and can only be pollinated from other trees. So, ya know, plant 100 :wink:

Zifozonke: They are in the the same family as Custard Apples, Annonaceae :smile:


--------------------




Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
InvisibleAllium
 User Gallery

Registered: 03/16/20
Posts: 1,735
Re: Asimina triloba - ITS PAW PAW SEASON! Largest Native Fruit of The Eastern United States [Re: Cactusdan]
    #26852066 - 07/29/20 04:59 PM (13 days, 15 hours ago)

Hey thanks Dan :cool:

I did mange to get a few seeds last year,and I planted them in my garden bed to over winter. They never did sprout though. Next time I'll throw them in the fridge.

I need to try and get some more tree growing in my yard though, so I can have a good supply of fruit, I just love em!


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
OfflineCactusdan
Patecatl
Male User Gallery


Registered: 10/11/07
Posts: 7,024
Loc: Oregon
Last seen: 1 day, 6 hours
Re: Asimina triloba - ITS PAW PAW SEASON! Largest Native Fruit of The Eastern United States [Re: Allium]
    #26852111 - 07/29/20 05:25 PM (13 days, 15 hours ago)

They require a chilling period, so be sure to give them proper treatment!


--------------------




Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
InvisibleAllium
 User Gallery

Registered: 03/16/20
Posts: 1,735
Re: Asimina triloba - ITS PAW PAW SEASON! Largest Native Fruit of The Eastern United States [Re: Cactusdan]
    #26852171 - 07/29/20 05:59 PM (13 days, 14 hours ago)

Quote:

Cactusdan said:
They require a chilling period, so be sure to give them proper treatment!




Thanks for that link :thumbup:

I totally would have only kept them in for a month or so, like I do my Apple/Pear/Plum seeds, but it appears that these need a lot longer chilling time to break dormancy.


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
OfflineSempeur
Tourist


Registered: 01/12/20
Posts: 59
Loc: Canada Flag
Last seen: 13 days, 10 hours
Re: Asimina triloba - ITS PAW PAW SEASON! Largest Native Fruit of The Eastern United States [Re: LifeUnderAwno]
    #26852516 - 07/29/20 09:28 PM (13 days, 10 hours ago)

My pawpaw seedlings just came up, pumped to watch them grow over the next couple years. Been trying to find local trees but haven't had much luck.


--------------------
Be strange, but don't be a stranger.


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
InvisibleAllium
 User Gallery

Registered: 03/16/20
Posts: 1,735
Re: Asimina triloba - ITS PAW PAW SEASON! Largest Native Fruit of The Eastern United States [Re: Sempeur]
    #26853866 - 07/30/20 05:29 PM (12 days, 14 hours ago)

That's outstanding man :thumbup: I wish them lots of luck :awesomenod:


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
InvisibleAllium
 User Gallery

Registered: 03/16/20
Posts: 1,735
Re: Asimina triloba - ITS PAW PAW SEASON! Largest Native Fruit of The Eastern United States [Re: Allium]
    #26855565 - 07/31/20 03:31 PM (11 days, 16 hours ago)

I took a few pics today of the only stand of Asimina triloba I have ever seen in my area, so I don't think it is as common in my neck of the woods.











Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
OfflineCactusdan
Patecatl
Male User Gallery


Registered: 10/11/07
Posts: 7,024
Loc: Oregon
Last seen: 1 day, 6 hours
Re: Asimina triloba - ITS PAW PAW SEASON! Largest Native Fruit of The Eastern United States [Re: Allium]
    #26855700 - 07/31/20 05:14 PM (11 days, 15 hours ago)

Love the leaves on them, looks tropical!


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
InvisibleAllium
 User Gallery

Registered: 03/16/20
Posts: 1,735
Re: Asimina triloba - ITS PAW PAW SEASON! Largest Native Fruit of The Eastern United States [Re: Cactusdan]
    #26855711 - 07/31/20 05:22 PM (11 days, 15 hours ago)

I know right! I sure felt like I was in a tropical rain forest today looking at them, that and the drenching humidity that we have here!


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
InvisibleLifeUnderAwno
I'm a teapot

Registered: 07/04/16
Posts: 669
Loc: growing out of perlite
Re: Asimina triloba - ITS PAW PAW SEASON! Largest Native Fruit of The Eastern United States [Re: Allium]
    #26855854 - 07/31/20 07:01 PM (11 days, 13 hours ago)

Hope to spread the paw paw love this year, they are a very helpful tree ecologically, especially in the native range. When they are ripe you can shake trees and the fruit fall right down. Usually you can find them all around the ground, great for seed picking if they are overdone or near rotted.

Allium if there are a small number near you, it is a good chance to plant many more!! I will have to go collect some ground fruit soon, the prime ripe time is about now until the end of August, sometimes later depending on the location. Maybe i can send you some seeds. You can put them outside to overwinter or fridge them in moist soil for something like 3 months then start them inside for transplant


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
InvisibleAllium
 User Gallery

Registered: 03/16/20
Posts: 1,735
Re: Asimina triloba - ITS PAW PAW SEASON! Largest Native Fruit of The Eastern United States [Re: LifeUnderAwno]
    #26857006 - 08/01/20 12:11 PM (10 days, 20 hours ago)

Yeah man, I need to do just that :cool: I can't get any seeds here, because the trees here either don't produce much fruit, or the squirrels get at them first. The variety here are really small, and are kind of hard to spot,and I only saw one fruit out of all the trees that I looked at. I might shake the trees and see if any will drop. I got one or two last season doing this.


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Jump to top. Pages: 1

Shop: Bridgetown Botanicals CBD Edibles, CBD Oils, CBD Topicals   North Spore North Spore Mushroom Grow Kits & Cultivation Supplies   Original Sensible Seeds Autoflowering Cannabis Seeds, Bulk Cannabis Seeds, Feminized Cannabis Seeds, High THC Strains, USA West Coast Strains   Kraken Kratom Red Vein Kratom   PhytoExtractum Kratom Powder for Sale, Maeng Da Thai Kratom Leaf Powder   Amazon Dehydrator, Scales

Mushrooms, Mycology and Psychedelics >> The Ethnobotanical Garden

Similar ThreadsPosterViewsRepliesLast post
* Native Wisdom Uncovered. Two New Entheogens for you.
( 1 2 all )
Aneglakya 8,338 34 11/30/12 04:36 PM
by BotanicalEvolution
* paw paw fruit jellynutz 891 6 07/09/04 03:02 PM
by the man
* Tobacco alternative?
( 1 2 all )
cybrbeast 4,960 33 02/19/07 06:22 AM
by Nalim
* Native Amercan Medicine ID Request shroomydan 942 5 06/22/06 04:47 PM
by pod3
* Ipomoea violacea and native ethnogenic use in North America theshiftingwalls 844 3 02/17/04 06:01 PM
by theshiftingwalls
* ethnobotanicals native to NH musicisgood 419 1 07/06/04 05:09 PM
by Aneglakya
* syrian rue native of USA. ayadegasaski 408 1 04/17/07 08:37 AM
by in_sherman
* MG's allmost ready for seedling season(pics) MAIA 1,255 5 11/05/01 09:20 AM
by San Pedro

Extra information
You cannot start new topics / You cannot reply to topics
HTML is disabled / BBCode is enabled
Moderator: karode13, naum, Mostly_Harmless
230 topic views. 1 members, 9 guests and 2 web crawlers are browsing this forum.
[ Print Topic ]
Search this thread:
Zamnesia.com
Please support our sponsors.

Copyright 1997-2020 Mind Media. Some rights reserved.

Generated in 0.045 seconds spending 0.004 seconds on 13 queries.