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OnlineLearyfanS
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Today in psychedelic history (06/29)
    #12822192 - 06/29/10 10:09 AM (10 years, 15 days ago)

  • 1955:  Gordon Wasson and Allan Richardson become the first white people to take part in the sacred mushroom ceremony of the ancient Mazatec people




Quote:

On the evening of June 29, 1955, Wasson and Richardson became the first white people to consume the sacred mushrooms of the ancient Mazatec people, in a ceremony held under the supervision of curandera Doña María Sabina, who performed for them a velada or vigil at the home of her friend Cayetano García.

Wasson later wrote, "we all ate our mushrooms facing the wall where the small altar table stood. We ate them in silence, except for Cayetano's father, don Emilio, who was consulting the mushrooms about his infected left forearm. He would jerk his head violently with each mushroom that he swallowed, and utter a smacking noise, as though in acknowledgment of their divine potency. I was seated in the corner of the room on the left of the altar. The señora asked me to move because the word would come down there…"

"I joined Allan immediately behind the señora, we took about a half hour to eat our six pairs of mushrooms. By eleven o'clock we had finished our respective portions, the señora crossing herself with the last swallow.…At about 11:20 Allan leaned from his chair and whispered to me that he was having a chill. We wrapped him in a blanket.. A little later he leaned over again and said, `Gordon, I am beginning to see things,' to which I gave him the comforting reply that I was too."

"The patterns grew into architectural structures, with colonnades and architraves, patios of regal splendor, the stonework all in brilliant colors--gold and onyx and ebony--all harmoniously and ingeniously contrived, in richest magnificence extending beyond the reach of sight. These architectural visions seemed oriental, though at every stage I pointed out to myself that they could not be identified with any specific oriental country..."

"At one point in the faint moonlight the bouquet on the table assumed the dimensions and shape of an imperial conveyance, a triumphal car, drawn by zoological creatures conceivable only in an imaginary mythology, bearing a woman clothed in regal splendor. The visions came in endless succession, each growing out of the preceding ones. We had the sensation that the walls of our humble house had vanished, that our untrammeled souls were floating in the empyrean, stroked by divine breeze, possessed of a divine mobility that would transport anywhere on the wings of a thought. Only when by an act of conscious effort I touched the wall of Cayetano's house would I be brought back to the confines of the room where we all were, and this touch with reality seemed to be what precipitated nausea in me."

(erowid)









  • 1965:  The Charlatans become the first known rock band to play under the influence of LSD




Quote:

June 29, 1965

The CHARLATANS make their debut performance at the Red Dog Saloon in Virginia City, Nevada. This is the first known instance of a band playing rock music under the influence of LSD (many in the audience were tripping too). This event is also commonly seen as the birth of the psychedelic concert poster.

(Lysergia)









  • 1968:  Pink Floyd release the album A Saucerful Of Secrets




Quote:

A Saucerful of Secrets is the second studio album by the English rock group Pink Floyd. It was recorded at EMI's Abbey Road Studios on various dates from August 1967 to April 1968. It is both the last Pink Floyd album on which Syd Barrett would appear and the only studio album in which all 5 band members contributed.

Recording and structure

During its difficult recording sessions, Barrett became increasingly unstable and in January 1968 David Gilmour was brought in. Barrett finally left the band in early March, leaving the new incarnation of Pink Floyd to finish the album. As a result, A Saucerful of Secrets is the only non-compilation Pink Floyd album on which all five band members appear, with Gilmour appearing on four songs ("Let There Be More Light", "Corporal Clegg", "A Saucerful of Secrets", and "See-Saw") and Barrett on three ("Remember a Day", "Jugband Blues" and "Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun").

As well as "Jugband Blues", the album was to include "Vegetable Man," another Syd Barrett song. However, the band believed "Vegetable Man", with its autobiographical lyrics, was unsuitable for inclusion and so it was left off the album. The song was to appear on a single as the b-side to another unreleased track, "Scream Thy Last Scream". Two additional Syd Barrett songs "In The Beechwoods" and "No Title" were also recorded early in the sessions for the album.

Keyboardist Richard Wright sings lead or backing vocals on four of the album's seven songs, making this the only Pink Floyd album where Wright's vocal contributions outnumber those of the rest of the band. This was also the only album to contain lead vocals by all five Pink Floyd members (Mason sings lead parts on "Corporal Clegg").

Track listing

Side one


1. "Let There Be More Light"  Waters Gilmour, Wright 5:38
2. "Remember a Day"  Wright Wright 4:33
3. "Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun"  Waters Waters 5:28
4. "Corporal Clegg"  Waters Gilmour, Wright, Mason 4:13

Side two

1. "A Saucerful of Secrets"  Waters, Wright, Gilmour, Mason Instrumental 11:52
2. "See-Saw"  Wright Wright 4:36
3. "Jugband Blues"  Barrett Barrett 3:00


Released 29 June 1968
Recorded August and October 1967, January–April 1968, EMI Studios, London
Genre Psychedelic rock, progressive rock
Length 39:25
Language English
Label Columbia/EMI (UK)
Tower/Capitol (US)
Producer Norman Smith


(https://en.wikipedia.org)









  • 1993:  Bolinas LSD bust takes place




Quote:

BOLINAS, CALIFORNIA: Drug reform activists are calling for an end to harassment of LSD and psychedelic drugs following the government's announcement of its biggest-ever LSD bust in Bolinas on June 29. Local residents expressed shock at the arrest of Sage Appel, 50, Marcella Whitefield, 27, George Horvath, 33, and Neal Dry, 38. who were well-regarded in the community.

Bolinas, a countercultural enclave on the coast north of San Francisco, has been the object of ongoing DEA harassment and an involuntary training ground for narcotics agents, who ride through the hills in tie-dye shirts on trail bikes looking for marijuana gardens.

The defendants, who are accused of operating a major nationwide LSD distribution network that sold over one million doses of crystal LSD to undercover agents over a period of four years, face a minimum of twelve years to life under current federal sentencing laws.

California Drug Policy Reform Coalition spokesman Dale Gieringer denounced the government's persecution of psychedelic drugs. "Twelve years to life for a consensual, non-violent 'crime' is not acceptable. No one thinks the defendants in question present any threat to the community. Unlike our narcotics agents, they were basically honest, peaceable people, who provided a valued service to their customers. At most they owe some back taxes."

Law enforcement described the Bolinas ring as a major nationwide LSD supplier that distributed over one million doses per month. However, defense attorney Tony Serra, a Bolinas resident who is representing George Horvath, accused the DEA of escalating the size of the ring by demanding ever-increasing amounts of LSD. Government informants dealt with the ring for four years, busting it only when they were afraid it was about to go out of business. Despite this, the government failed to achieve its long-standing goal of catching one of the handful of LSD chemists who are thought to be supplying the U.S. from the Bay Area.

The CDPRC denounced the DEA's "creative conspiracy" against LSD. "The DEA hates LSD because it epitomizes many of the best characteristics of the alternative drug culture: it is non-addictive, rarely causes crime or violence, and often begets strong spiritual feelings. Moreover, it is distributed by people who have a strong ethical sense that is difficult for narcotics agents to penetrate." The CDPRC noted that the risk of bad trips, while real, is comparatively low: in San Francisco, where LSD is used by thousands of ravers every weekend, the Haight-Ashbury clinic reports treating less than a dozen LSD cases a year.


(http://wild-bohemian.com/)









  • 1987:  Michael Randall of the Brotherhood Of Eternal Love is released from prison




Quote:

Memories from the Summer of Love: Meet the ’60s Couple Who Helped ‘Turn on the World’ to LSD

By Johnny Dodd•@johnny_dodd
Posted on September 4, 2017


Fifty years ago, in a psychedelic haze of tie-dye and patchouli oil, an estimated 100,000 hippies, flower children and countless other free spirits descended upon San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury neighborhood during the Summer of Love.

And Michael Randall, along with his wife, Carol, was smack dab in the middle of it all, giving away LSD — which had become illegal in the state months earlier — to anyone who wanted it, convinced that the drug would usher in a “spiritual awakening” on the planet.

“I remember this one beautiful, magnificent day,” Michael, 74, tells PEOPLE. “Jefferson Airplane was doing a free concert in Golden Gate Park and we passed out 8,000 doses of Orange Sunshine. We got the whole place loaded. I’ll tell you what, nobody went home that night the same as when they woke up. It was downright revolutionary.”

In the annals of ’60s lore, Michael and Carol, along with a handful of Southern California surfers who called themselves the Brotherhood of Eternal Love, played a starring role.

Dubbed the Hippie Mafia, they distributed and later produced a potent, popular form of LSD known as Orange Sunshine — taken by everyone from the Beatles and Jimi Hendrix to Steve Jobs — in an effort to create a “psychedelic revolution.”

The trippy, mind-altering story of the Brotherhood is chronicled in the newly-released documentary Orange Sunshine, directed and produced by filmmaker William Kirkley, now available on iTunes.

“We were just a bunch of young people who found their way to psychedelics and decided to band together,” explains Michael. “We thought the whole world was going to wind up taking acid and this earth-shaking transformational change was upon us, that war would end and people would end up living closer to nature.”

In an effort to turn the world on to LSD, first synthesized by the Swiss chemist Albert Hofmann in 1938, they often gave the drug away for free, paying their bills by the cash earned from smuggling hashish into the country.

“We weren’t gangsters,” says Michael. “We didn’t carry guns, rob banks or hurt people. We were doing this for all the right reasons and we truly didn’t benefit economically. We were living in teepees and driving old pickup trucks.”

One of Orange Sunshine’s fans was Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, who described his sojourns with the drug to his biographer Waltar Isaacson as “a profound experience, one of the most important things in my life. LSD shows you that there’s another side to the coin, and you can’t remember it when it wears off, but you know it. It reinforced my sense of what was important — creating great things instead of making money.”

Randall reckons the group distributed upwards of 130 million doses of Orange Sunshine before federal drug agents finally busted the Brotherhood in 1972. Many of his cohorts ended up in prison, but Michael, Carol and their kids spent the next 12 years on the run before he was finally arrested in 1984 and sent to prison for five years.

These days, the Randalls get an I-told-you-so chuckle every time they hear about another scientific study involving psychedelics, such as LSD, which is now being researched for its potential to relieve everything from clinical depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder to anxiety in cancer patients and depression in hospice patients.

“The ’60s was a movement of people who saw how things could be done better,” says Carol. “It was a whole movement that changed things and the Brotherhood was a big part of it. We wanted to create a spiritual revolution and nothing less.”


(http://people.com)




Name: MICHAEL BOYD RANDALL
Register Number: 17882-013
Age: 74
Race: White
Sex: Male
Released On: 06/29/1987


(https://www.bop.gov)















Edited by Learyfan (06/29/20 08:04 AM)


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Offlinebdzsmkr365247
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Re: Today in psychedelic history (06/29) [Re: Learyfan] * 1
    #12822237 - 06/29/10 10:29 AM (10 years, 15 days ago)

1968! PiNK FlOyd!! that is a great album!!!!!!!!  also rocking out while tripping on lsd would be craZzZyyy


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:trippinballs:

MuSh LoVe

:fearandloathing:

::...ThE WaTEr iS sErENiTy...::

:trees::burnone::mushdance::burnone::trees:


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Re: Today in psychedelic history (06/29) [Re: bdzsmkr365247] * 1
    #12822698 - 06/29/10 12:25 PM (10 years, 15 days ago)

What a great day, for tripping. Thats such a crazy album. Not nearly as crazy as Piper at the Gates of Dawn. I would have thought Barret wrote Corporal Clang, it seems to ridiculous for the rest of the band. Show's how much I know.


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OnlineLearyfanS
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Re: Today in psychedelic history (06/29) [Re: unfoldedbrain]
    #12824018 - 06/29/10 04:57 PM (10 years, 15 days ago)

A Saucerful Of Secrets full album!

















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Mp3 of the month: The Mamas and The Papas - Strange Young Girls



Edited by Learyfan (06/29/14 01:16 PM)


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Re: Today in psychedelic history (06/29) [Re: Learyfan] * 1
    #12824165 - 06/29/10 05:17 PM (10 years, 15 days ago)

Ah, those were some pretty great things that happened on this date... :bongload:

The last lines of Jugband Blues are probably my favorite lines that Syd wrote:

"And what exactly is a dream? And what exactly is a joke?"


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OnlineLearyfanS
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Re: Today in psychedelic history (06/29) [Re: nooneman]
    #12824291 - 06/29/10 05:38 PM (10 years, 15 days ago)

Quote:

nooneman said:
Ah, those were some pretty great things that happened on this date... :bongload:

The last lines of Jugband Blues are probably my favorite lines that Syd wrote:

"And what exactly is a dream? And what exactly is a joke?"




Yeah, great lyrics.  I think all the lyrics in that song are very interesting.  Maybe I'm reading too much into it, but the whole song sounds like a sarcastic message from Syd to the rest of the band, because they must have told him that they thought he had gone crazy. 



Quote:

It's awfully considerate of you to think of me here
And I'm most obliged to you for making it clear
That I'm not here.




Sounds like Syd's sarcastically saying "Wow, thanks a lot for your concern and thank you so much for calling me crazy."



Quote:

And I'm grateful that you threw away my old shoes
And brought me here instead dressed in red




Almost sounds like he's saying "Thanks for taking me away from what I was doing so that I could come play this old Pink Floyd game I used to play."



Quote:

And I'm wondering who could be writing this song.




"You say I've lost my mind and that I'm not myself anymore.  If that's true, then who is it that is writing this song?"













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Mp3 of the month: The Mamas and The Papas - Strange Young Girls



Edited by Learyfan (06/29/12 07:32 AM)


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Re: Today in psychedelic history (06/29) [Re: nooneman]
    #14690272 - 06/29/11 07:46 AM (9 years, 16 days ago)

Annual bump













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Mp3 of the month: The Mamas and The Papas - Strange Young Girls



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OnlineLearyfanS
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Re: Today in psychedelic history (06/29) [Re: Learyfan]
    #16454733 - 06/29/12 07:37 AM (8 years, 15 days ago)

Annual bump.


















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Mp3 of the month: The Mamas and The Papas - Strange Young Girls



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Re: Today in psychedelic history (06/29) [Re: Learyfan]
    #18489185 - 06/29/13 07:42 PM (7 years, 14 days ago)

20th anniversary of the Bolinas LSD bust and 45th anniversary of A Saucerful Of Secrets today.  Here's the only other info I have on the Bolinas bust.  It's an appeal by Sage Appel in 1996.  If anyone has anymore info on this case, please let me know. 





Quote:

105 F.3d 667: United States of America, Plaintiff-appellee, v. Sage Appel, Aka Neal Evan Dry, Defendant-appellant
United States Court of Appeals, Ninth Circuit. - 105 F.3d 667
Argued and Submitted July 12, 1996.Decided Dec. 31, 1996

Before: WOOD,* CANBY, and RYMER, Circuit Judges.
1

MEMORANDUM**
2

Defendant Sage Appel appeals the sentence imposed after she pleaded guilty to conspiracy to possess LSD with intent to distribute and possession of LSD with intent to distribute, in violation of 21 U.S.C. §§ 846, 841(a)(1). Appel argues on appeal that the district court should have departed downward on her mandatory sentence of 120 months because of sentencing entrapment or sentencing manipulation. We have jurisdiction under 28 U.S.C. § 1291 and 18 U.S.C. § 3742(b). We affirm because Appel has not shown that sentencing entrapment or manipulation occurred in this case.
3

We will not repeat the facts here because the parties are familiar with them. We do not review a district court's discretionary decision not to depart from the Sentencing Guidelines. United States v. Lam, 20 F.3d 999, 1001 (9th Cir.1994). We may review de novo, however, a decision by the district court that a particular ground of departure is impermissible as a matter of law. Id. Appel argues that the district court believed it could not downward depart under the precedent of this Circuit. We will assume for purposes of decision that the district court was of the view that, under the facts as it found them, it was without power to depart downward. We review that decision de novo, and review the district court's underlying factual findings for clear error. Id.; see United States v. Basinger, 60 F.3d 1400, 1409 (9th Cir.1995).
4

Appel contends that the government engaged in sentencing entrapment by inducing her to make a final, larger-than-usual purchase of 40 grams of LSD. We have held that sentencing entrapment may be a proper basis for a downward departure at sentencing. United States v. Baker, 63 F.3d 1478, 1500 (9th Cir.1995), cert. denied, 116 S.Ct. 824 (1996). "Sentencing entrapment ... occurs when a defendant, although predisposed to commit a minor offense or lesser offense, is entrapped into committing a greater offense subject to greater punishment." Id. (internal quotations omitted); see also U.S.S.G. § 2D1.1, comment. (n. 15) (Nov. 1995) (downward departure under Sentencing Guidelines may be warranted in reverse sting operation when government induces defendant to buy larger than normal amount of drugs by setting price substantially below normal market value). To sustain a claim of sentencing entrapment, a defendant must demonstrate both the lack of intent and the lack of capability to produce the quantity of drugs at issue. United States v. Naranjo, 52 F.3d 245, 250 n. 13 (9th Cir.1995); see also United States v. Steward, 16 F.3d 317, 321-22 (9th Cir.1994).1
5

Here, the district court analyzed the applicable law regarding sentencing entrapment and applied it to Appel's case. The court stated:
6

[T]here was no sentencing entrapment as there was no unwarranted pressure on defendant by government agents to increase the amount of drugs sold so as to result in a higher sentence. In fact, Appel, herself, with no pressure from the DEA agents was the cause of the final large sale of 40 grams of LSD.... The defendant clearly had both the intent and the capability to produce the 40 grams of LSD.
7

* * *
8

* * *
9

... Defendant was not predisposed to commit a lesser offense and was then entrapped to commit a greater offense....
10

* * *
11

* * *
12

[T]he government was not making cumulative purchases from Appel for purposes of manipulating her sentence but for valid investigatory reasons.
13

The factual findings of the district court are supported by the record and are not clearly erroneous. Appel suggested to the agents that she could sell them 40 grams of LSD, and she did in fact produce 40 grams for sale. Appel clearly failed to show that she lacked the intent or capability to make a 40-gram sale. Her sentencing entrapment claim accordingly fails. See Naranjo, 52 F.3d at 250 n. 13.
14

Appel also contends that she was eligible for downward departure on the ground of sentencing manipulation. By sentencing manipulation she means an improper prolonging of the investigation by the government in order to multiply the number of sales and thereby subject her to a greater sentence. See Baker, 63 F.3d at 1499-1500. We need not address the status of sentencing manipulation under our circuit law, see id. at 1500, because we conclude that the district court properly determined that no such manipulation occurred. While this investigation did continue for what may have been an unusually long time, almost four years, we do not find erroneous the district court's finding that the agents continued making purchases from Appel because they were trying to gain more information about the drug organization, including the identity of the source of the drugs. See United States v. Okey, 47 F.3d 238, 240 (7th Cir.1995) (rejecting defendant's claim of sentencing entrapment because he failed to show that government improperly prolonged investigation to increase his sentence); United States v. Barth, 990 F.2d 422, 425 (8th Cir.1993) (same). This primary, legitimate motive for the government's extension of the investigation defeats Appel's claim of sentencing manipulation. See United States v. Harris, 997 F.2d 812, 819 (10th Cir.1993) (finding of "outrageous government conduct" violative of defendant's due process rights supported only when government agents "carry out multiple transactions with the primary purpose of stacking charges").
15

The judgment of the district court is
16

AFFIRMED.


(http://law.justia.com/)

















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Mp3 of the month: The Mamas and The Papas - Strange Young Girls



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Re: Today in psychedelic history (06/29) [Re: Learyfan] * 1
    #18489449 - 06/29/13 08:42 PM (7 years, 14 days ago)

40 grams of LSD...DAMN, that is a lot of acid!  What a shame!!  :facepalm:

N.B.


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Re: Today in psychedelic history (06/29) [Re: Nature Boy]
    #20202702 - 06/29/14 01:27 PM (6 years, 14 days ago)

Yeah, definitely.  Heartbreaking. 

:sad:
















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Mp3 of the month: The Mamas and The Papas - Strange Young Girls



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Re: Today in psychedelic history (06/29) [Re: Learyfan]
    #21872028 - 06/29/15 07:41 AM (5 years, 15 days ago)

50th anniversary of The Charlatans becoming the first known band to play under the influence of LSD. 

















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Mp3 of the month: The Mamas and The Papas - Strange Young Girls



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Re: Today in psychedelic history (06/29) [Re: Learyfan] * 2
    #21872058 - 06/29/15 07:59 AM (5 years, 15 days ago)

Listening to a Saucerful of Secrets right now.  "Now, now, now is the time, time, time to be aware."

Thanks, Learyfan!

N.B.


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Re: Today in psychedelic history (06/29) [Re: Nature Boy]
    #23393113 - 06/29/16 07:46 AM (4 years, 14 days ago)

:cool:  Yeah man, I love that album.  I love the lyric "The outer lock rolled slowly back.  The service men were heard to sigh.  For there revealed in glowing robes was Lucy in the skyyyyyyyyyyy"

Anyway, here's some more info on the Bolinas bust.  This is an article on the supposed chemist, Sarah Matzar.  :sun:



Quote:

"Art Is My God"—Sarah Matzar Isn’t Like Other Acid Cooks

[Editor’s note: The following excerpt from Heads: A Biography of Psychedelic America, by Jesse Jarnow, relays the never-before-told story of Sarah Matzar (above), a Guatemalan quilter and groundbreaking LSD chemist. In the 1980s, Matzar was living in the US, making quilts and working to get her master’s in Anthropology, when a revelation hit her. Her story serves as a counter-narrative to the all-white, all-male patina often given to psychedelic culture.

Photo by Marc Franklin, excerpted from Franklin’s Psychedelic Pioneers, a transpersonal portrait series featured in Heads.]

Sarah Matzar is dosed and looking up at the ceiling of the Grateful Dead’s Front Street rehearsal hall in San Rafael when she figures out what she’s going to do with the crystal LSD. Besides make money, that is. Sarah is in her mid-twenties and no utopian, though she likes acid well enough and loves the Dead.

But Sarah just wants to support her family. Desperately. She is in a fix.

By life circumstance, here she is tripping at Front Street, looking up at the fixture over the fluorescent lights with its patterned plastic bubbles undulating across the surface. And she realizes that the indentations are the perfect shape to serve as molds for LSD gel tabs.

An early ’70s graduate of Pacific High, the experimental institution outside Palo Alto where students built geodesic domes and interacted with monks, Sarah is well placed in the Dead world and already has her reasons for being around Front Street in the early ’80s. She asks Dead roadie and Front Street manager Kidd Candelario where he got the light fixture, acquires one, and brings it back to her new residence in Berkeley.

Along with her Pacific High chemistry classes, she picks up further specialized knowledge from Melissa Cargill, Owsley’s lab collaborator and LSD pioneer. Sarah and Melissa have been friends for a few years, bonding over textile design, which is Sarah’s true passion.

“Melissa was like, ‘You go girl!’” Sarah laughs. Cargill, out of the acid game since the ’60s and working for George Lucas’s Industrial Light and Magic on Raiders of the Lost Ark and other projects, suggests that Sarah grease the plastic bubbles with aerosol-butter Pam. It works like a charm.

Sarah Matzar isn’t like other acid cooks. For starters, she is a woman, which—besides Melissa Cargill and Rhoney Stanley of Owsley’s lab and scattered others in the UK—is rare in LSD chemistry circles. Sarah is 4’10” and possesses a lacerating wit. She is starting her own textile business and getting her master’s in anthropology at UC Berkeley, studying Mayan art. She is not here to save the world.

“Do I believe in LSD? Yes, I do,” she says, “but it’s not for everybody.” She is doing this for her family, lowercase. She is doing this to send money back to Guatemala, where she belongs. She’d spent part of her childhood in the States and part in Central and South America, where her mother is from. “Sometimes where you’re born isn’t where you’re from,” she notes.

“Art is my God,” she says, and her God manifests in the form of intricate Guatemalan quilt making, symbols and systems colliding. “My Guatemalan color sense combined with my psychedelic color sense,” she says. In her quilting she attempts to “break out of the block,” the traditional division in pattern making, and does so, the fabrics continuing their conversation across rippled quilted surfaces.

She is not in the United States by choice, which is where the urgency comes from. In the late ’70s, Guatemala’s decades-running civil war grew too turbulent, so she and her family—her mother, brother, sister and she—are living in a condemned house in Berkeley, near the Ashby Flea Market.

One of the other squat residents is a Deadhead from New York, who has a line on grams of crystal LSD, fresh from a European chemist. And, just like that, Sarah is pulled into the upper-middle-class Grateful Dead scene she’d known during her high school years in Palo Alto. She re-establishes old connections, partially for business’s sake. She always did love the Dead, though, and acid, too, but this is pure economic opportunity. In time, much of her family will return to Guatemala, but Sarah will support them.

The psychedelic world had always at least presented itself as classless. But in addition to being a woman in the LSD scene, Sarah finds herself as an outsider in the hippie-bourgie Dead scene. She uses the LSD and her not inconsiderable natural intelligence to bootstrap herself into business and, in short, into the upper echelons. In that regard, the psychedelic world becomes an access point, a place with its own social ladder with its own skills.

In the Berkeley squat, Sarah experiments with various methods before landing on the gel tabs. They’re a hit, and the plastic light fixture technique becomes a standard manufacturing method in the chemical underground. There are perhaps dozens of other chemists like Sarah, picking up crystal from various sources, usually European, and converting it into marketable doses.

“A lot of people learned how to do it,” she says. “But a lot of people learned how to do it badly.” There is one acid cook she knows who works exclusively in gas station bathrooms. He rolls up, plugs in a portable dehumidifier, lays the crystal into consumable form, and is out within an hour and a half. He is not the most precise operator, though a memorable character. They come in all stripes, as do the European chemists. The one who supplies Sarah’s supply is an idealist of the old-guard Owsleyian sort.

Sarah makes all kinds of LSD besides the gels, including blotters, from unmarked squares to intricate designs she creates herself. Sometimes she works for hire, but usually she’s in charge, alongside a few partners. When it gets going, about half of her vast business is with the Dead world, and about half elsewhere. She spends some time hanging out among the Talking Heads’ art-punk circles in New York in the early ’80s, too. She’s got plenty of connections, is fun to talk to, and the product moves well.

She feels inherent sexism in plenty of interactions, customers expecting they’d be able to talk her prices down. But her resolve is strong, and fuck them, she’s got a family.

A group of associates forms around her, about half women, unusual in the psychedelic world, as well. The crystal LSD market in the early ’80s is big on speculation, she recalls later. People will often sit on good supplies for years before converting it.

She wires money home, no more than $600 at a time, and makes $40,000 in less than a year. And though she doesn’t move LSD at shows or on tour, she is absolutely part of the Grateful Dead’s extended family and—since before she was in the acid game—friends with Owsley himself.

“He was a total textile freak,” Sarah says of their early bond. They have long conversations about how the Jacquard loom was the first computer.

Sarah estimates that there are perhaps a half-dozen heads at her level of acid manufacture moving in and out of the band’s inner circle. Though cordial with most, she wouldn’t characterize any as “Grateful Dead Family.” Not since the days of Owsley and Goldfinger could anyone make that claim, she says. But there is Grateful Dead and there is Family and there is acid, sometimes brought back from Europe by old friends who know.

She travels with the band from coast to coast and goes to shows. Sometimes she sells her quilts, but rarely. Owsley shows her the ropes of the alternative business structures that are starting to thrive around the Dead. “He definitely operated in penny-ante kind of world,” she says. “I would believe that he never had a real bank account.” He teaches her about hip economics, even still using the exact phrase.

One time, out on tour somewhere, at a rest stop perhaps, someone offers Sarah Matzar her own acid gels.

“It’s really good,” she is told. Sarah declines.

[You can read more on Sarah Matzar’s adventures in LSD cooking, including a prolonged encounter with the American government in Heads


(http://theinfluence.org)


















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Re: Today in psychedelic history (06/29) [Re: Learyfan] * 1
    #23393773 - 06/29/16 12:30 PM (4 years, 13 days ago)

Thanks Leary!:grin:


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Look Deep Into Nature,and Then You Will Understand Everything Better.

Albert Einstein


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Re: Today in psychedelic history (06/29) [Re: Learyfan]
    #24443845 - 06/29/17 07:37 AM (3 years, 14 days ago)

You're welcome!












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Re: Today in psychedelic history (06/29) [Re: Nature Boy] * 1
    #24443875 - 06/29/17 08:13 AM (3 years, 14 days ago)

remember a day is a great tune


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Re: Today in psychedelic history (06/29) [Re: Learyfan] * 1
    #25298361 - 06/29/18 08:35 AM (2 years, 14 days ago)

50th anniversary of one of the most underrated Pink Floyd albums, A Saucerful of Secrets, today!











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Re: Today in psychedelic history (06/29) [Re: Learyfan]
    #26080771 - 06/29/19 01:14 PM (1 year, 13 days ago)

By the way, if you've ever seen the early Red Dog Saloon posters that say "Opening June 21", that was the original opening day date.  From what I can gather, opening day was delayed and it actually opened on June 29, 1965.  I've read that the poster I just mentioned went for over $18,000 in auction in 2015.  FYI.



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"Around the same time that Owsley's name was becoming a household word in some households, there were rumors of a project that seemed designed to alleviate the adventure shortage. Some crazies were opening a totally Old West saloon with folk music in, of all places, the semi‑ghost town of Virginia City, Nevada.

"Virginia City wasn't actually such an odd place for a hippie saloon. The old boomtown capital of the Comstock Lode silver rush already had a colony of exotic people, including some psychedelic users. The latter group was centered around a second‑generation bohemian named Don Works, a member of the peyote‑eating Native American Church who had moved out to the Comstock country to be with his coreligionists among the Washoe and Piute Indians.

"Works lived on a little plot named the Zen Mine after a pair of nonproducing mine shafts running into the dusty hillside behind his cinder‑block cabin. The idea for the Red Dog Saloon had been formed there a few months before, when Works, a tall desperado type named Chan Laughlin (who had once owned a Berkeley folk music coffeehouse), and a rich folkie named Mark Unobsky were stranded in Works' two‑room cabin by a blizzard. With nothing to do but get stoned and play the board game Risk, they started fantasizing about a folk nightclub to enliven the mountain evenings. It actually sounded plausible, because there was no decent nightlife around for competition, and particularly because folk musicians were always passing through Nevada on their way between the Boston‑New York scene and San Francisco‑Berkeley. Some fairly big names might be willing to stop off and play a relaxed night or two.

"That was the original plan, anyway. Unobsky bought the old Comstock House building on C Street, near the original claim of the wild silver rush that financed the Civil War and drove Germany off the silver standard. Bohemian carpenters were called in from Marin County, and Laughlin was dispatched to San Francisco for antique red velvet drapes and brass fittings.

"On one of these buying trips Laughlin stopped off at Pine Street, where he'd hidden out for a while a few months before when he figured the police were after him for smuggling marijuana. While he was talking up the excitement of this stylish folk cabaret in the hills to a Pine Street friend, he met a fellow with a long blond Dutch boy haircut and a missing front tooth who was dressed to the nines in Edwardian duds. It so happened that this Edwardian dude with the elusive, slightly formal manner had put together a musical group that might fit right in.

"His was not a folk group, though, but a rock and roll band called the Charlatans. Well, why not? The Beatles, Dylan, this band in Los Angeles named the Byrds that was being called a folk‑rock group—suddenly it was clear that a hip rock and roll band was just what the Red Dog needed. And the Charlatans already had a following. Bob Hunter, the Dutch boy blond with the missing tooth, was a culture hero in certain circles at State College for his elegant Edwardiana. The pianist, Michael Ferguson, had the same sort of stature and had once run an unheard‑of kind of store at the edge of the Haight‑Ashbury. Magic Theater for Madmen Only had sold nothing but antique clothes, knickknacks, a little art and a lot of marijuana stash jars.

"The only problem with the band was that Hunter, an artist and boy‑wonder architect, had conceived the Charlatans as a sort of pop art statement, an American response to the British rock groups. At the moment it was really only the concept of a rock band; they had hundreds of publicity stills, featuring Edwardian clothes and twenties rowing‑crew uniforms, but had never rehearsed. For months now they'd been growing their hair down to their shoulders—much longer than the Beatles' hair—and carrying on like a rock band at parties, and now it was time to get down to finding out what they could play. A lot of work needed to be done. Hunter, for instance, couldn't play anything but tambourine and autoharp, and there were those who said he couldn't play that.

"The Red Dog became a sort of Pine Street project. A collage artist and one‑time motorcycle racer named Al Kelly went up to Virginia City to work on the remodeling. Ellen Harmon, the rangy woman who shared his tiny room in Pine Street where the walls were painted with pop art sound effects ("Poww!" "Bawannnngggg!"), went as a waitress. There was an abstract expressionist painter on Pine Street who managed two of the apartment houses, a shaggy‑bearded Southerner named Bill Ham. His light shows, which were like moving abstract paintings projected in brilliant colors on a screen, were Pine Street's favorite evening entertainment. He designed a light box for the Red Dog that would pulsate with color in time with the music.

"Altogether, a couple of dozen people from San Francisco moved up to Virginia City for the Red Dog project. After a number of delays and false starts, the Red Dog Saloon finally opened on June 29, 1965, advertised by a poster drawn by the Charlatans' pianist in a sort of old‑timey medicine‑show style that described the band as "The Limit of the Marvelous." The band moved up to Virginia City on opening day with one loudspeaker and a ten‑watt amplifier."


("Haight Ashbury - A History" by Charles Perry)














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Re: Today in psychedelic history (06/29) [Re: Learyfan]
    #26791442 - 06/29/20 08:21 AM (13 days, 1 hour ago)

55th anniversary of The Charlatans playing Red Dog Saloon while on LSD.

65th anniversary of Gordon Wasson and Allan Richardson becoming the first white people to take part in the sacred mushroom ceremony of the ancient Mazatec people.







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