Home | Community | Message Board


Vaposhop
Please support our sponsors.

Mushrooms, Mycology and Psychedelics >> Advanced Mycology

Welcome to the Shroomery Message Board! You are experiencing a small sample of what the site has to offer. Please login or register to post messages and view our exclusive members-only content. You'll gain access to additional forums, file attachments, board customizations, encrypted private messages, and much more!

Shop: Original Seeds Store Buy CBD, Cannabis Seeds, Compare CBD   Amazon Agar, Paul Stamets, pH Test Strips

Jump to first unread post. Pages: 1
Offlinezeronio
Stranger
Male

Registered: 10/16/01
Posts: 2,349
Loc: Slovenia
Last seen: 10 months, 14 days
Waste water treatment in constructed wetlands
    #2649080 - 05/07/04 05:03 AM (13 years, 2 months ago)

Now I have a question...

I made a contact with some people from a company that is constructing wetlands for waste water treatment. For now they've been using and researching mostly plants, algae & bacteria and I proposed that higher mushrooms might be interesting too. Unfortunately all I know about the subject is what I read from the Stamets GGMM where he mentions briefly that Pleurotus ostreatus could be used for something like that.
I can produce spawn of various species and I could get an opportunity to experiment in one of their wetlands. They could arrange analysis of concentration of heavy metals in mushrooms and substrate or monitor populations of nematodes or various bacteria, because they're running these tests for their purposes anyway.

Anybody knows anything about the subject?
Any ideas on how to make these experiments?
What do you think would be interesting to know?
Links?



Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Anonymous

Re: Waste water treatment in constructed wetlands [Re: zeronio]
    #2649946 - 05/07/04 02:34 PM (13 years, 2 months ago)

- Post History Deleted Upon User's Request -


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Invisiblewhiterasta
Day careobserver
 User Gallery
Registered: 04/09/02
Posts: 1,780
Loc: Oregon
Re: Waste water treatment in constructed wetlands [Re: zeronio]
    #2649985 - 05/07/04 02:55 PM (13 years, 2 months ago)

The type of wetlands used for sewer treatment are probably too wet for higher fungibut the perimeter would be a good candidate for nitrate consuming fungi.This was basicly what Stamets did.He had an microbial problem in a draw creek below his cows due to nitrate in their crap.I believe he use Stopharia rugoso-anulata to consume the excess nutrients polluting the creek.
Similarly the border zone of the primary ponds would be similarly nitrate rich and a potential productive spawning site for reducing overall nitrate leaching from the system.
Cool idea! I would like to see more spawning of gourmet wood lovers to consume stumpage and control regrowth of hardwoods on logging land.
The land owner could harvest a crop from the land and save on costly herbicides.
WR


--------------------
To old for this place


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
InvisibleSpeeker

Registered: 02/11/04
Posts: 649
Re: Waste water treatment in constructed wetlands [Re: whiterasta]
    #2650003 - 05/07/04 03:09 PM (13 years, 2 months ago)



Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Invisiblemicro
bunbun has a gungun
Male User Gallery

Registered: 05/09/03
Posts: 7,532
Loc: Brick City Flag
Re: Waste water treatment in constructed wetlands [Re: zeronio]
    #2658574 - 05/10/04 01:08 AM (13 years, 2 months ago)

Are you talking about groing the mycelium in the water itself? That seems like it might be difficult. I haven't read about Stamets and the Stofaria, though -- did he actually grow these in the water, or just have it absorb the water from the banks? Mycelium doesn't seem very adapted to living in an aqueous environment -- bacteria and yeast seem to prevail there (and the Oomycetes???)

I know Stamets' trick, though, was to grow the mycelium out on agar and then deprive it of nutrients for a while (aka starving it) and then introduce it to media with the contaminant to be biodegrated (with Pleurotus, anyway.) Don't know how this would apply. Just my 2c

--
Micro


--------------------
Any research paper or book for free
(Avatar is Maxxy, a character by Mizzyam, RIP)


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Offlinezeronio
Stranger
Male

Registered: 10/16/01
Posts: 2,349
Loc: Slovenia
Last seen: 10 months, 14 days
Re: Waste water treatment in constructed wetlands [Re: ]
    #2659029 - 05/10/04 03:27 AM (13 years, 2 months ago)

I'm not really qualified to do the research, I'm just looking for more information about this, so maybe I could convince them to do the research and that I could take some part in it.

Most of information I have come from Stamets like whiterasta & speeker noted. The mushrooms were grown in wet border zones (not in water) with the goal of reducing excess nutrients or bacteria & nematode populations, but he doesn't say much about the details. However I have other sources that describe carnivore species like Pleurotus ostreatus that feed on nematodes.

Quote:

Mycelium doesn't seem very adapted to living in an aqueous environment -- bacteria and yeast seem to prevail there (and the Oomycetes???)




Lower fungi, bacteria & algae are already used for waste water treatment, but Stamets is the only one claiming that also higher fungi have potential, but not directly in the water.

Quote:

I know Stamets' trick, though, was to grow the mycelium out on agar and then deprive it of nutrients for a while (aka starving it) and then introduce it to media with the contaminant to be biodegrated (with Pleurotus, anyway.) Don't know how this would apply. Just my 2c




Yes, this is also what I had in mind.
Another thing is that mushrooms can concentrate heavy metals from soil and could be used for decontamination.


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
OfflineMycena
mycoexplorer
Registered: 05/02/03
Posts: 270
Loc: indonesia
Last seen: 5 years, 3 months
Re: Waste water treatment in constructed wetlands [Re: zeronio]
    #2659146 - 05/10/04 12:04 PM (13 years, 2 months ago)

Typha sp.(bulrushes) are great nutrient absorbers in these ssytems
they detoxify many industrial pollutants but not all
They build up a lot of biomass
Maybe this is where fungi come in
Water plants like typha which will detoxify water but also eventually lead to wetland senescence (filling in) need to be removed but these may still be a disposal hazard
How about using mushrooms to further reduce and treat contaminated biomass in the form of wetland plants removed from the system
test load before and after to assess contaminant removal
use somthing easy like Pleurotus or stropharia


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Invisiblemycofile
Pooh-Bah
 User Gallery

Registered: 01/19/99
Posts: 2,336
Loc: Uranus
Trusted Cultivator
Re: Waste water treatment in constructed wetlands [Re: Mycena]
    #2659660 - 05/10/04 03:23 PM (13 years, 2 months ago)

white rot fungi are also good candidates for various types of bio-remediation, particularly hydrocarbons, may work well for other pollutants too though.

Too my knowledge, nobody has worked out a way to use higher fungi directly in wetlands or water. Colonizing berms, planting errosion control beds for water to flow through, or even just innoculating soil directly is all done with pretty impressive results.

I don't think you'll get too far trying to incorporate the mycelia directly into the wetlands, perhaps prefiltering through a berm of garden giants, oysters, or white rot might be workable. Otherwise, perhaps a perimeter berm would be called for to protect any overflow problems?

Without knowing the site, it's kinda hard to stab in the dark. Good luck though, and please keep us updated!


--------------------
"From a certain point of view"
-Jedi Master Obi Wan Kenobi

PM me with any cultivation questions.

I just looked at my profile and realized I had a website at one point in time on geocities, it's not there anymore and I have no idea what I had on it. Anybody remember my website from several years aga? PM if so please.


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Offlinezeronio
Stranger
Male

Registered: 10/16/01
Posts: 2,349
Loc: Slovenia
Last seen: 10 months, 14 days
Re: Waste water treatment in constructed wetlands [Re: mycofile]
    #2661677 - 05/11/04 03:05 AM (13 years, 2 months ago)

Thanks!

Here's something practical to start with:

(from http://www.fungi.com/mycotech/farmwaste.html)


As always mushrooms never cease to amaze me. Now I found something I had absolutely no idea about: Mushrooms live in water too!

Quote:

http://www.nifg.org.uk/facts_b.htm
Most fungi are terrestrial, but there are a number of species that are aquatic. The main aquatic group are the Chytridiomycetes which are a primitive group of fungi that were possibly the ancestors of all the fungi. There are however there are about 11 species of Basidiomycetes (species with spores forming on structures called basidia ? most of our toadstools belong to this group) that are also aquatic occurring in either freshwater or marine environments. Four of these species are ballistotrophic, that is they forcibly eject their spores thus remaining "typical" basidiomycetes. However, seven of these species have lost this capability and have become more like underwater puffballs enclosing their spores inside an outer structure. One of the more common British marine basidiomycetes is Nia vibrissa which forms 1-3mm wide subglobose unstalked pale cream to orange brown fruiting bodies. It is found on woody substrates like driftwood, sunken ship timbers (eg the Mary Rose) and Cord Grass, Spartina spp. culms and rhizomes. The evolution of this marine species has fascinated some scientists who looked at its molecular relationships with other fungi. They clearly showed that although it is a gasteroid fungi in appearance, it is not related to other gasteroid fungi. It is closest to the Mangrove Fungus, Halocyphina villosa, which is close to the terrestrial fungus, Henningsomyces candidus. This suggests that the evolution trail was first marine, then terrestrial and this species has curiously returned to the marine environment. Other terrestrial fungi that could be related (suggested by molecular work) are Schizophyllum commune and Fistulina hepatica, the Beefsteak Fungus. These are both microscopical oddities with similarities to Nia vibrissa, but more work is needed to confirm this relationship.




Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Anonymous

Re: Waste water treatment in constructed wetlands [Re: zeronio]
    #2662843 - 05/11/04 01:20 PM (13 years, 2 months ago)

- Post History Deleted Upon User's Request -


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
InvisibleKttail
DragonDreamer
Male

Registered: 09/15/03
Posts: 114
Loc: S. Oregon Coast , USA
Re: Waste water treatment in constructed wetlands [Re: zeronio]
    #2690417 - 05/17/04 09:57 AM (13 years, 2 months ago)

Wow, a fascinating subject and lots of good information.
I am a wastewater treatment operator at a very small facility and have wondered about the very same thing. I would like to hear more on this and hopefully learn the results.
I know that my effluent is loaded with nitrate ammonia, nitrate nitrite, and phosphorous. Beyond that I haven't tested it for anything other than fecal coliforms, chlorine residual, and ph.
Naturally, in a project that you are looking at I wouldn't believe that you would have to worry about cl2.
I'm adding this discussion to my favorites and hope that it continues to get updated.


--------------------
"Do not meddle,
In the affairs of Dragons.
For thou art crunchy,
and tasty with catsup."


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Jump to top. Pages: 1

Shop: Original Seeds Store Buy CBD, Cannabis Seeds, Compare CBD   Amazon Agar, Paul Stamets, pH Test Strips

Mushrooms, Mycology and Psychedelics >> Advanced Mycology

Similar ThreadsPosterViewsRepliesLast post
* Fungus Gnats, nematodes (Steinernema spp) and hypoaspis Olgualion 3,165 15 04/13/04 11:39 PM
by mycoguy
* Constructing a rich mans teterium from plexi glass
( 1 2 all )
geko127 6,324 29 11/14/02 07:10 AM
by geko127
* Construction set backs jelsert 919 9 12/11/02 11:06 PM
by On_the_Down-Low
* Constructing a flow hood Dmonikal 2,484 14 10/10/05 06:29 AM
by ohmatic
* Fungcidal treatment of Grains for Fusarium Mold Heruuka 859 4 10/09/02 04:17 PM
by Ducon
* mex-a metabolic waste - excreted liquid experiment ohmatic 2,609 19 06/05/06 04:49 PM
by ohmatic
* Hip's Bleach Experiment/TEK
( 1 2 3 4 ... 12 13 all )
Hippie3 41,070 244 07/10/04 02:15 AM
by JaRRn
* light aparatus construction doktor_alternate 740 6 10/12/03 03:51 PM
by ar393

Extra information
You cannot start new topics / You cannot reply to topics
HTML is disabled / BBCode is enabled
Moderator: RogerRabbit, bodhisatta
1,104 topic views. 0 members, 6 guests and 0 web crawlers are browsing this forum.
[ Toggle Favorite | Print Topic | Stats ]
Search this thread:
World Seed Supply
Please support our sponsors.

Copyright 1997-2017 Mind Media. Some rights reserved.

Generated in 0.032 seconds spending 0.007 seconds on 19 queries.