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OfflineYthanA
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America's Invisible Pot Addicts
    #25400458 - 08/20/18 12:45 PM (2 years, 8 months ago)

America’s Invisible Pot Addicts
www.theatlantic.com

The proliferation of retail boutiques in California did not really bother him, Evan told me, but the billboards did. Advertisements for delivery, advertisements promoting the substance for relaxation, for fun, for health. “Shop. It’s legal.” “Hello marijuana, goodbye hangover.” “It’s not a trigger,” he told me. “But it is in your face.”

When we spoke, he had been sober for a hard-fought seven weeks: seven weeks of sleepless nights, intermittent nausea, irritability, trouble focusing, and psychological turmoil. There were upsides, he said, in terms of reduced mental fog, a fatter wallet, and a growing sense of confidence that he could quit. “I don’t think it’s a ‘can’ as much as a ‘must,’” he said.

Evan, who asked that his full name not be used for fear of professional repercussions, has a self-described cannabis-use disorder. If not necessarily because of legalization, but alongside legalization, such problems are becoming more common: The share of adults with one has doubled since the early aughts, as the share of cannabis users who consume it daily or near-daily has jumped nearly 50 percent—all “in the context of increasingly permissive cannabis legislation, attitudes, and lower risk perception,” as the National Institutes of Health put it.

Public-health experts worry about the increasingly potent options available, and the striking number of constant users. “Cannabis is potentially a real public-health problem,” said Mark A. R. Kleiman, a professor of public policy at New York University. “It wasn’t obvious to me 25 years ago, when 9 percent of self-reported cannabis users over the last month reported daily or near-daily use. I always was prepared to say, ‘No, it’s not a very abusable drug. Nine percent of anybody will do something stupid.’ But that number is now [something like] 40 percent.” They argue that state and local governments are setting up legal regimes without sufficient public-health protection, with some even warning that the country is replacing one form of reefer madness with another, careening from treating cannabis as if it were as dangerous as heroin to treating it as if it were as benign as kombucha.

But cannabis is not benign, even if it is relatively benign, compared with alcohol, opiates, and cigarettes, among other substances. Thousands of Americans are finding their own use problematic in a climate where pot products are getting more potent, more socially acceptable to use, and yet easier to come by, not that it was particularly hard before.

For Keith Humphreys, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford University, the most compelling evidence of the deleterious effects comes from users themselves. “In large national surveys, about one in 10 people who smoke it say they have a lot of problems. They say things like, ‘I have trouble quitting. I think a lot about quitting and I can’t do it. I smoked more than I intended to. I neglect responsibilities.’ There are plenty of people who have problems with it, in terms of things like concentration, short-term memory, and motivation,” he said. “People will say, ‘Oh, that’s just you fuddy-duddy doctors.’ Actually, no. It’s millions of people who use the drug who say that it causes problems.”

Users or former users I spoke with described lost jobs, lost marriages, lost houses, lost money, lost time. Foreclosures and divorces. Weight gain and mental-health problems. And one other thing: the problem of convincing other people that what they were experiencing was real. A few mentioned jokes about Doritos, and comments implying that the real issue was that they were lazy stoners. Others mentioned the common belief that you can be “psychologically” addicted to pot, but not “physically” or “really” addicted. The condition remains misunderstood, discounted, and strangely invisible, even as legalization and white-marketization pitches ahead.

The country is in the midst of a volte-face on marijuana. The federal government still classifies cannabis as a Schedule I drug, with no accepted medical use. (Meth and PCP, among other drugs, are Schedule II.) Politicians still argue it is a gateway to the use of things like heroin and cocaine. The country still spends billions of dollars fighting it in a bloody and futile drug war, and still arrests more people for offenses related to cannabis than it does for all violent crimes combined.

Yet dozens of states have pushed ahead with legalization for medical or recreational purposes, given that for decades physicians have argued that marijuana’s health risks have been overstated and its medical uses overlooked; activists have stressed prohibition’s tremendous fiscal cost and far worse human cost; and researchers have convincingly argued that cannabis is far less dangerous than alcohol. A solid majority of Americans support legalization nowadays.

Academics and public-health officials, though, have raised the concern that cannabis’s real risks have been overlooked or underplayed—perhaps as part of a counter-reaction to federal prohibition, and perhaps because millions and millions of cannabis users have no problems controlling their use. “Part of how legalization was sold was with this assumption that there was no harm, in reaction to the message that everyone has smoked marijuana was going to ruin their whole life,” Humphreys told me. It was a point Kleiman agreed with. “I do think that not legalization, but the legalization movement, does have a lot on its conscience now,” he said. “The mantra about how this is a harmless, natural, and non-addictive substance—it’s now known by everybody. And it’s a lie.”

Thousands of businesses, as well as local governments earning tax money off of sales, are now literally invested in that lie. “The liquor companies are salivating,” Matt Karnes of GreenWave Advisors told me. “They can’t wait to come in full force.” He added that Big Pharma was targeting the medical market, with Wall Street, Silicon Valley, food businesses, and tobacco companies aiming at the recreational market.

Sellers are targeting broad swaths of the consumer market—soccer moms, recent retirees, folks looking to replace their nightly glass of chardonnay with a precisely dosed, low-calorie, and hangover-free mint. Many have consciously played up cannabis as a lifestyle product, a gift to give yourself, like a nice crystal or an antioxidant face cream. “This is not about marijuana,” one executive at the California retailer MedMen recently argued. “This is about the people who use cannabis for all the reasons people have used cannabis for hundreds of years. Yes, for recreation, just like alcohol, but also for wellness.”

Evan started off smoking with his friends when they were playing sports or video games, lighting up to chill out after his nine-to-five as a paralegal at a law office. But that soon became couch-lock, and he lost interest in working out, going out, doing anything with his roommates. Then came a lack of motivation and the slow erosion of ambition, and law school moving further out of reach. He started smoking before work and after work. Eventually, he realized it was impossible to get through the day without it. “I was smoking anytime I had to do anything boring, and it took a long time before I realized that I wasn’t doing anything without getting stoned,” he said.

His first attempts to reduce his use went miserably, as the consequences on his health and his life piled up. He gained nearly 40 pounds, he said, when he stopped working out and cooking his own food at home. He recognized that he was just barely getting by at work, and was continually worried about getting fired. Worse, his friends were unsympathetic to the idea that he was struggling and needed help. “[You have to] try to convince someone that something that is hurting you is hurting you,” he said.

Other people who found their use problematic or had managed to quit, none of whom wanted to use their names, described similar struggles and consequences. “I was running two companies at the time, and fitting smoking in between running those companies. Then, we sold those companies and I had a whole lot of time on my hands,” one other former cannabis user told me. “I just started sitting around smoking all the time. And things just came to a halt. I was in terrible shape. I was depressed.”

Lax regulatory standards and aggressive commercialization in some states have compounded some existing public-health risks, raised new ones, and failed to tamp down on others, experts argue. In terms of compounding risks, many cite the availability of hyper-potent marijuana products. “We’re seeing these increases in the strength of cannabis, as we are also seeing an emergence of new types of products,” such as edibles, tinctures, vape pens, sublingual sprays, and concentrates, Ziva Cooper, an associate professor of clinical neurobiology in the Department of Psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center, told me. “A lot of these concentrates can have up to 90 percent THC,” she said, whereas the kind of flower you could get 30 years ago was far, far weaker. Scientists are not sure how such high-octane products affect people’s bodies, she said, but worry that they might have more potential for raising tolerance, introducing brain damage, and inculcating dependence.

As for new risks: In many stores, budtenders are providing medical advice with no licensing or training whatsoever. “I’m most scared of the advice to smoke marijuana during pregnancy for cramps,” said Humphreys, arguing that sellers were providing recommendations with no scientific backing, good or bad, at all.

In terms of long-standing risks, the lack of federal involvement in legalization has meant that marijuana products are not being safety-tested like pharmaceuticals; measured and dosed like food products; subjected to agricultural-safety and pesticide standards like crops; and held to labeling standards like alcohol. (Different states have different rules and testing regimes, complicating things further.)

Health experts also cited an uncomfortable truth about allowing a vice product to be widely available, loosely regulated, and fully commercialized: Heavy users will make up a huge share of sales, with businesses wanting them to buy more and spend more and use more, despite any health consequences.

“The reckless way that we are legalizing marijuana so far is mind-boggling from a public-health perspective,” Kevin Sabet, an Obama administration official and a founder of the nonprofit Smart Approaches to Marijuana, told me. “The issue now is that we have lobbyists, special interests, and people whose motivation is to make money that are writing all of these laws and taking control of the conversation.”

This is not to say that prohibition is a more attractive policy, or that legalization has proven to be a public-health disaster. “The big-picture view is that the vast majority of people who use cannabis are not going to be problematic users,” said Jolene Forman, an attorney at the Drug Policy Alliance. “They’re not going to have a cannabis-use disorder. They’re going to have a healthy relationship with it. And criminalization actually increases the harms related to cannabis, and so having a strictly regulated market where there can be limits on advertising, where only adults can purchase cannabis, and where you’re going to get a wide variety of products makes sense.”

Still, strictly regulated might mean more strictly regulated than today, at least in some places, drug-policy experts argue. “Here, what we’ve done is we’ve copied the alcohol industry fully formed, and then on steroids with very minimal regulation,” Humphreys said. “The oversight boards of a number of states are the industry themselves. We’ve learned enough about capitalism to know that’s very dangerous.”

A number of policy reforms might tamp down on problem use and protect consumers, without quashing the legal market or pivoting back to prohibition and all its harms. One extreme option would be to require markets to be noncommercial: The District of Columbia, for instance, does not allow recreational sales, but does allow home cultivation and the gifting of marijuana products among adults. “If I got to pick a policy, that would probably be it,” Kleiman told me. “That would be a fine place to be if we were starting from prohibition, but we are starting from patchwork legalization. As the Vermont farmer says, I don’t think you can get there from here. I fear its time has passed. It’s generally true that the drug warriors have never missed an opportunity to miss an opportunity.”

There’s no shortage of other reasonable proposals, many already in place or under consideration in some states. The government could run marijuana stores, as in Canada. States could require budtenders to have some training or to refrain from making medical claims. They could ask users to set a monthly THC purchase cap and remain under it. They could cap the amount of THC in products, and bar producers from making edibles that are attractive to kids, like candies. A ban or limits on marijuana advertising are also options, as is requiring cannabis dispensaries to post public-health information.

Then, there are THC taxes, designed to hit heavy users the hardest. Some drug-policy experts argue that such levies would just push people from marijuana to alcohol, with dangerous health consequences. “It would be like saying, ‘Let’s let the beef and pork industries market and do whatever they wish, but let’s have much tougher restrictions on tofu and seitan,’” said Mason Tvert of the Marijuana Policy Project. “In light of the current system, where alcohol is so prevalent and is a more harmful substance, it is bad policy to steer people toward that.” Yet reducing the commercial appeal of all vice products—cigarettes, alcohol, marijuana—is an option, if not necessarily a popular one.

Perhaps most important might be reintroducing some reasonable skepticism about cannabis, especially until scientists have a better sense of the health effects of high-potency products, used frequently. Until then, listening to and believing the hundreds of thousands of users who argue marijuana is not always benign might be a good start.


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OfflineMorel Guy
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Re: America's Invisible Pot Addicts [Re: Ythan] * 1
    #25400819 - 08/20/18 04:18 PM (2 years, 8 months ago)

Going from very promising fun of being stoned, to the painful experience of disappointing average sober life.

Safer than alcohol and tobacco.


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"in sterquiliniis invenitur in stercore invenitur"

In filth it will be found in dung it will be found


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OfflineKonyap

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Re: America's Invisible Pot Addicts [Re: Morel Guy]
    #25400849 - 08/20/18 04:33 PM (2 years, 8 months ago)

My paper today was lamenting that we detain illegals but up in arms about legal pot

There's a new device that senses pot in breathe up to 1/billionth
so if they use that it can detect weed in your system up to 3 hours!


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Invisibleopenmind
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Re: America's Invisible Pot Addicts [Re: Ythan]
    #25400859 - 08/20/18 04:39 PM (2 years, 8 months ago)

Quote:

Ythan said:


Evan, who asked that his full name not be used for fear of professional repercussions, has a self-described cannabis-use disorder.

.....“The big-picture view is that the vast majority of people who use cannabis are not going to be problematic users,” said Jolene Forman, an attorney at the Drug Policy Alliance. “They’re not going to have a cannabis-use disorder. They’re going to have a healthy relationship with it.....







What the fuck is a "cannabis use disorder" ? :rolleyes:



Why don't they just call it what it is.....addiction....It is people that lack any ability to control themselves and people becoming addicted, it is not some "disorder", it's addiction plain and simple :shrug: .

Sure one can say "addiction" is a disorder of sorts, but calling it that instead of addiction is like they're trying to make it seem different than addiction to other drugs....

.....That's the most ridiculous term/label I've ever heard for addiction. When people are hooked on heroin, I've never heard to it refereed to as "Heroin use disorder"...alcoholics aren't labeled as people with an "alcohol use disorder"...cigarette smokers aren't labeled with a "Nicotine use disorder".








-OM

.


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Invisiblepassifloracaerulea
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Re: America's Invisible Pot Addicts [Re: Konyap]
    #25400860 - 08/20/18 04:40 PM (2 years, 8 months ago)

:stonedjerk:


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Offlinemorrowasted
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Re: America's Invisible Pot Addicts [Re: openmind]
    #25401200 - 08/20/18 07:36 PM (2 years, 8 months ago)

Quote:

openmind said:
Quote:

Ythan said:


Evan, who asked that his full name not be used for fear of professional repercussions, has a self-described cannabis-use disorder.

.....“The big-picture view is that the vast majority of people who use cannabis are not going to be problematic users,” said Jolene Forman, an attorney at the Drug Policy Alliance. “They’re not going to have a cannabis-use disorder. They’re going to have a healthy relationship with it.....







What the fuck is a "cannabis use disorder" ? :rolleyes:



Why don't they just call it what it is.....addiction....It is people that lack any ability to control themselves and people becoming addicted, it is not some "disorder", it's addiction plain and simple :shrug: .

Sure one can say "addiction" is a disorder of sorts, but calling it that instead of addiction is like they're trying to make it seem different than addiction to other drugs....

.....That's the most ridiculous term/label I've ever heard for addiction. When people are hooked on heroin, I've never heard to it refereed to as "Heroin use disorder"...alcoholics aren't labeled as people with an "alcohol use disorder"...cigarette smokers aren't labeled with a "Nicotine use disorder".








-OM

.


that is exactly how they are labeled by medical professionals 

Alcohol Use Disorder
Cannabis Use Disorder
etc.


I am extremely addicted to weed (probably 200mg THC edibles daily + .3g smoked daily), but it is barely dysfunctional in my case, and arguably serves some useful functions. I am still in shape and very active and social. It just affects my wallet more than I'd like. But not as much as it used to. It does suck knowing that I am physically dependent on a drug to not be nauseous and to be able to sleep well, but compared to the substance use disorders I used to have I can deal


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OfflineTurd_Burglar
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Re: America's Invisible Pot Addicts [Re: morrowasted] * 2
    #25401410 - 08/20/18 09:02 PM (2 years, 8 months ago)

Im sorry but fuck off. All it takes is a few weeks of self control to get over the hump and you're fine. I've been diagnosed with "Cannabis use disorder" when I was 20 by a psychiatrist. Now ive gone close to a year without ganja. All it took was proper motivation and some self control. I dont wanna hear anyone bitching and moaning comparing "Weed addiction" to heroin. You wouldnt suck dick for weed would you..? Ive gotten offered head for coke back when I was a dealer. Never when I was just selling weed. Grow up and get some self control before you blame Marijuana for your problems.

Im usually not aggresive about my opinions but Ii just killed enough Hennessey to kill a horse. Blow me.


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....................:holyshit:....................


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OfflinePeyote Road
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Re: America's Invisible Pot Addicts [Re: morrowasted]
    #25401431 - 08/20/18 09:09 PM (2 years, 8 months ago)

Looking back over my extensive history of drug use (which includes addictions to crack and heroin and just about everything else aside from meth), I would have to say cannabis was for me among the most harmful and most addictive drugs. One of the reasons for that is that it seems so benign, even beneficial. Unlike crack for example, cannabis actually benefited me in many ways. It was a great painkiller, very therapeutic, it made me appreciate life more, expanded my mind, spurred my interest in spiritual and intellectual pursuits, helped me overcome depression, connected me with nature, I could go on. So what was the problem? I didn't know when to stop. Cannabis made me more delusional than any other drug, and it fooled me multiple times at different points in my life where I thought my use was still beneficial when in fact it was actually wreaking havoc on my mental health and overall life trajectory.


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The path of the herbalist is to open ourselves to nature in an innocent and pure way. SHe in turn will open her bounty and reward us with many valuable secrets. May the earth bless you. - Michael Tierra


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OfflinePeyote Road
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Re: America's Invisible Pot Addicts [Re: Turd_Burglar]
    #25401443 - 08/20/18 09:14 PM (2 years, 8 months ago)

Quote:

Turd_Burglar said:
Im sorry but fuck off. All it takes is a few weeks of self control to get over the hump and you're fine. I've been diagnosed with "Cannabis use disorder" when I was 20 by a psychiatrist. Now ive gone close to a year without ganja. All it took was proper motivation and some self control. I dont wanna hear anyone bitching and moaning comparing "Weed addiction" to heroin. You wouldnt suck dick for weed would you..? Ive gotten offered head for coke back when I was a dealer. Never when I was just selling weed. Grow up and get some self control before you blame Marijuana for your problems.

Im usually not aggresive about my opinions but Ii just killed enough Hennessey to kill a horse. Blow me.





All it takes is proper motivation and self control to quit almost any addiction. You can be a hardcore heroin addict and with some suboxone and/or kratom as well as proper self control and motivation you can be clean in a couple of weeks. Cocaine/crack can be stopped cold turkey without much withdrawal, I've done it.

For me weed was harder to stay away from than heroin, because the consequence of heroin use acted as a deterrent. It was a lot more expensive and I knew if I started using again, I'd quickly regain my habit and have to go through withdrawal again. With weed on the other hand, I could always rationalize smoking more because there was no immediate adverse consequence. This is also why many people find it more difficult to quit cigarettes than other drugs. It's so easy to just go to the gas station and buy another pack and nothing horrible is gonna happen to you. You won't get arrested or overdose or wake up with an insane hangover.


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The path of the herbalist is to open ourselves to nature in an innocent and pure way. SHe in turn will open her bounty and reward us with many valuable secrets. May the earth bless you. - Michael Tierra


Edited by Peyote Road (08/20/18 09:15 PM)


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InvisibleJufin
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Re: America's Invisible Pot Addicts [Re: Turd_Burglar]
    #25401478 - 08/20/18 09:28 PM (2 years, 8 months ago)

I have some problems with marijuana.  I love its effects for creativity and enjoyment of music, games and movies, but it fucks me up socially, changes my personality in a weird way that makes me really awkward, changes my speech, I can't sing properly when I'm stoned, I get scared to be around people.  I quit recently for a month, and it started off well, but then I felt absolutely miserable.  But that's probably other issues than weed.  I've been off it for a week and a half at the moment.  I think the key is occasional use, even once a week.


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Invisiblepassifloracaerulea
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Re: America's Invisible Pot Addicts [Re: Peyote Road] * 1
    #25401496 - 08/20/18 09:34 PM (2 years, 8 months ago)

Weed is beneficial. Even smoking it is good for your lungs. It helps kill cancers of all types and helps promote healthy sleep and muscle relaxation, two things that are severely lacking for most people through living an herb free lifestyle, unless they are taking pharms like opiates, diazepines, and muscle relaxers.


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Invisiblepassifloracaerulea
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Re: America's Invisible Pot Addicts [Re: Jufin] * 1
    #25401502 - 08/20/18 09:36 PM (2 years, 8 months ago)

Quote:

Jufin said:
I have some problems with marijuana.  I love its effects for creativity and enjoyment of music, games and movies, but it fucks me up socially, changes my personality in a weird way that makes me really awkward, changes my speech, I can't sing properly when I'm stoned, I get scared to be around people.  I quit recently for a month, and it started off well, but then I felt absolutely miserable.  But that's probably other issues than weed.  I've been off it for a week and a half at the moment.  I think the key is occasional use, even once a week.



Sounds like you just have a fucked up personality disorder, and you should probably stay off of anything remotely mind altering if your brain can't cope.


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InvisibleJufin
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Re: America's Invisible Pot Addicts [Re: passifloracaerulea]
    #25401508 - 08/20/18 09:38 PM (2 years, 8 months ago)

Quote:

passifloracaerulea said:
Quote:

Jufin said:
I have some problems with marijuana.  I love its effects for creativity and enjoyment of music, games and movies, but it fucks me up socially, changes my personality in a weird way that makes me really awkward, changes my speech, I can't sing properly when I'm stoned, I get scared to be around people.  I quit recently for a month, and it started off well, but then I felt absolutely miserable.  But that's probably other issues than weed.  I've been off it for a week and a half at the moment.  I think the key is occasional use, even once a week.



Sounds like you just have a fucked up personality disorder, and you should probably stay off of anything remotely mind altering if your brain can't cope.



Yeah something like that.  But some things I'm completely fine with, like mushrooms, MDMA, ketamine...


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OfflineCrispy224
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Re: America's Invisible Pot Addicts [Re: Jufin]
    #25401526 - 08/20/18 09:42 PM (2 years, 8 months ago)

"Users or former users I spoke with described lost jobs, lost marriages, lost houses, lost money, lost time. Foreclosures and divorces."
Who the fuck has lost any of these things due to marijuana. If someone is that bad off on marijuana I could only imagine them on an actual drug.


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OfflinePeyote Road
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Re: America's Invisible Pot Addicts [Re: Crispy224]
    #25401562 - 08/20/18 09:53 PM (2 years, 8 months ago)

well, you can lose a job over marijuana if you fail a drug test or get arrested in a state where it's still illegal. You could lose a marriage if your partner is really against you smoking weed and you fail to quit, lost houses I dunno about that except if you get arrested or I guess you're just irresponsible and spend too much on weed. Lost money and time go without saying. Foreclosures and divorces are just a repeat of what was said before.


--------------------
The path of the herbalist is to open ourselves to nature in an innocent and pure way. SHe in turn will open her bounty and reward us with many valuable secrets. May the earth bless you. - Michael Tierra


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Offlinemorrowasted
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Re: America's Invisible Pot Addicts [Re: Peyote Road]
    #25401628 - 08/20/18 10:11 PM (2 years, 8 months ago)

Quote:

For me weed was harder to stay away from than heroin, because the consequence of heroin use acted as a deterrent


bingo. I quit heroin, meth, all that shit and i could quit weed too IF I REALLY WANTED TO but it would be a HUGE pain in the ass. Very mentally uncomfortable. Quitting hard drugs was worth the fact that quitting them is a huge pain in the ass because NOT quitting them is also a huge pain in the ass. also I have quit weed for over a year multiple times and every time I go back to it I realize that overall I am happier when I am using it even though there are some undesirable side effects


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InvisibleJufin
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Re: America's Invisible Pot Addicts [Re: Peyote Road]
    #25401767 - 08/20/18 10:46 PM (2 years, 8 months ago)

Quote:

Peyote Road said:
well, you can lose a job over marijuana if you fail a drug test or get arrested in a state where it's still illegal. You could lose a marriage if your partner is really against you smoking weed and you fail to quit, lost houses I dunno about that except if you get arrested or I guess you're just irresponsible and spend too much on weed. Lost money and time go without saying. Foreclosures and divorces are just a repeat of what was said before.



Also, it can stir up underlying mental issues in some people, such as me.  I wish I could smoke weed and go about my day normally, but I can't.  But the positive effects of weed are probably too good for me to stop using it entirely.


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Offlinerider420
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Re: America's Invisible Pot Addicts [Re: Jufin]
    #25401984 - 08/21/18 12:18 AM (2 years, 8 months ago)

SAJLMFAO Smoking a joint laughing my fucking ass off, at this Reefer Madness.


Got a good laugh at the narcs dissing people using drugs on a drug site, who the fuck do the narcs think their fooling other then themselves and they call drug users delusional.

BTW If you have an issue with cannabis odds are your obese and one drink away from being an alcoholic and are one roll of the dice from a gambling addiction.


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Offlinerider420
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Re: America's Invisible Pot Addicts [Re: Jufin]
    #25402000 - 08/21/18 12:29 AM (2 years, 8 months ago)

Quote:

Jufin said:
Also, it can stir up underlying mental issues in some people, such as me.  I wish I could smoke weed and go about my day normally, but I can't.  But the positive effects of weed are probably too good for me to stop using it entirely.




In Canada we have medical users who use far more cannabis then you do who can go about their day normally only because of the positive effects of cannabis. An example are Canadian soldiers who suffer from PTSD from seeing their friends die in Afghanistan.

If you had access to quality strains of cannabis you too could use cannabis and still function normally even if your suffering from a mental illness.


BTW if you don't believe me please come to BC Canada after Oct 17 when recreational cannabis is legal and try it for yourself.:bigblunt:


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Re: America's Invisible Pot Addicts [Re: rider420]
    #25402002 - 08/21/18 12:30 AM (2 years, 8 months ago)

I don't think anyone's dissing anyone for using drugs here.  I'm just sharing my experience with it.


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