Home | Community | Message Board


Sporeworks
Please support our sponsors.

Feedback and Administration >> Shroomery News Service

Welcome to the Shroomery Message Board! You are experiencing a small sample of what the site has to offer. Please login or register to post messages and view our exclusive members-only content. You'll gain access to additional forums, file attachments, board customizations, encrypted private messages, and much more!

Shop: Unfolding Nature Unfolding Nature: Being in the Implicate Order   Original Sensible Seeds Autoflowering Cannabis Seeds, Bulk Cannabis Seeds, Feminized Cannabis Seeds, High THC Strains, USA West Coast Strains   PhytoExtractum Kratom Powder for Sale   Kraken Kratom Kratom Capsules for Sale, Red Vein Kratom   Bridgetown Botanicals CBD Edibles, CBD Oils   North Spore Cultivation Supplies, North Spore Mushroom Grow Kits & Cultivation Supplies   Amazon Portable Greenhouse

Jump to first unread post. Pages: 1
InvisibleMostly_HarmlessM
wyrd bið ful aræd
Male User Gallery


Registered: 05/12/09
Posts: 4,996
Loc: Perfidious Albion Flag
Turning Plants into Drug Factories
    #22862353 - 02/04/16 02:57 AM (5 years, 26 days ago)

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/turning-plants-into-drug-factories/

Quote:

Researchers are developing GM plants that can be used as pharmaceutical biofactories to produce inexpensive, ingestible medicines

February 2, 2016

The day could soon come when patients could be taking their heart medication as a sprinkling of seeds on cereal or treating cancer with a daily cup of herbal tea. This is not woo being peddled by an alternative medicine salesman—it is the aim of a pair of biochemists who want to provide the next generation of drugs, for everything from HIV to chronic pain, to the world’s poor by producing them in fields using genetically modified (GM) plants instead of in factories.

Biochemists David Craik at The University of Queensland and Marilyn Anderson at La Trobe University have received Australia’s Ramaciotti Biomedical Research Award worth some $700,000 to develop the technology to turn plants into cheap biofactories for drugs made of mini proteins called cyclotides.

Like other proteins, cyclotides comprise a string of amino acids, the body’s building blocks. Unlike most proteins, though, the ends of a cyclotide are joined together so the molecule forms a circle. Cross-linking disulfide bonds reinforce the protein’s structure. It is this structure that helps cyclotides combine the best features of small-molecule drugs like Paracetamol (acetaminophen) and larger peptide, or protein, drugs like insulin.

Because of their complexity peptide drugs are more precisely targeted and cause fewer side effects than small-molecule drugs, but the same complexity makes them more difficult to store and administer. Unlike small-molecule drugs peptide compounds normally have to be injected, because if swallowed, they are broken down into amino acids just like any other ingested protein, long before they can be absorbed and transported to their target. Without the weak point of loose ends cyclotides can resist degradation by our digestive enzymes, allowing them to reach their targets intact. "We think peptides are the future of drugs for reasons of being more selective, more potent and potentially safer, because when a peptide eventually breaks down it just breaks down into amino acids, and amino acids are food basically," Craik says.

Cyclotides were first discovered in the 1960s when Red Cross doctor Lorents Gran noticed that women in the Congo drank tea made from a local weed to speed up childbirth. The peptide kalata B1 was quickly identified as the active ingredient, but scientists could not work out why the molecule retained its activity after being boiled and drunk until Craik and his colleagues discovered its cyclized structure in 1995.

Since then hundreds of cyclotides have been found in plants around the world, and Craik believes there may be as many as 50,000. Agricultural scientists have already put some of these discoveries to use by genetically modifying cotton to express kalata B1, which Craik and Anderson discovered also has strong insecticidal properties that protects the crop from caterpillars without using pesticide sprays.

Scientists are not limited to natural cyclotides though; Craik has also developed a chemical reaction technique to join the ends of naturally linear peptides, giving them the same resistant properties. He has used the technique to cyclize a peptide from the venom of the cone snail to make a painkiller that is 120 times more potent than the currently used drug gabapentin in rat trials.

To produce enough of the peptides for human trials, Craik turned to his collaborator Anderson’s expertise in genetic modification technology to create plants that do the work for them, avoiding the chemical wastes generated by laboratory synthesis. Bolstered by Ramaciotti Award funding, however, the researchers are aiming even higher by engineering plants that will produce controlled doses of drugs in edible or drinkable form, even when grown in a remote village’s community garden.

The idea is not so far-fetched. Techniques are well established for genetically modifying plants, using the soil bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens to transfer the DNA, to produce large amounts of protein—even antibodies against Ebola are produced in GM tobacco. Scientists routinely build the gene construct with promotors that only switch on the gene in the parts of the plant where they want it to, making it easy to target drug production to the seeds, tubers or other designated parts of the plant. By targeting expression of the drugs to edible parts of the plant, Craik and Anderson hope to avoid the need to extract the cyclotides; if it does become necessary, the plants can simply be boiled to deactivate the other proteins.

The main technical challenge now is to get the GM plants to reliably express a consistent dose of the drugs so that users are not under- or overdosed. Initially, the team plans to select plants producing a high enough level of drug and to clone these plants for further study in greenhouses to determine the best conditions. The controlled growing environment of a greenhouse should allow growers to get a precise dose from their plants, but the project also aims to develop cheap kits to test the amount of any drugs produced in the field, such as dipsticks coated with antibodies to the drug. “This is relatively easy for proteins,” Craik says.

Another important hurdle is to overcome fears about the safety of GM plants and food. “We will work with the community to explain and demonstrate why our plants will be safe,” Craik says, pointing out the weight of evidence in favor of GM technology. “At least three billion meals derived from GM plants have been eaten by people and animals in 29 countries over 15 years without a single substantiated case of harm.” The plants will also only be released to the public once the drugs they produce have been accepted by regulatory bodies like the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Although Craik and Anderson are hopeful that pharmaceutical companies and governments will help develop the work, with inexpensive and environmentally gentle production systems a major selling point, they aim to make their medicine plants as user-friendly as possible for poor communities around the world. “We really think this could have major advantages for the developing world,” Craik told the Australian Broadcasting Corp. “The life expectancy of a male in Tanzania today is 37 years, and that's because of HIV AIDS—and that's not because we don't have good medicines for that. It's just that they can't afford it over there. But if we could be, for example, putting an anti-HIV medicine into a plant that they could be growing in their backyard, making a tea from the plant, in theory it could be something that could revolutionize the treatment of HIV.”

T. J. Higgins, a scientist at CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization) in Australia who has used similar technology to develop a pest-resistant cowpea for subsistence farmers in sub-Saharan communities, believes the time is right for projects like Craik and Anderson’s. “Based on our experience developing a GM cowpea…the community is ready for a GM product that contributes to their health, provided it has passed all the safety requirements,” Higgins says.




Post Extras: Filter  Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
OfflineMyco Dude
Stranger
Registered: 12/27/15
Posts: 85
Last seen: 4 months, 12 days
Re: Turning Plants into Drug Factories [Re: Mostly_Harmless]
    #22864603 - 02/04/16 07:24 PM (5 years, 26 days ago)

Super interesting, im glad to see gmos being developed for health instead of death.


Post Extras: Filter  Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
OfflineDr. Funtime
Stranger

Registered: 02/04/13
Posts: 39
Last seen: 7 hours, 12 minutes
Re: Turning Plants into Drug Factories [Re: Myco Dude]
    #22865040 - 02/04/16 09:30 PM (5 years, 25 days ago)

Quote:

Myco Dude said:
Super interesting, im glad to see gmos being developed for health instead of death.



I cant think of a single GMO being developed as a weapon or whatever it is you are trying to say.

Can you?


Post Extras: Filter  Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Invisiblerefried

Registered: 06/14/13
Posts: 3,674
Re: Turning Plants into Drug Factories *DELETED* [Re: Dr. Funtime]
    #22869488 - 02/06/16 01:34 AM (5 years, 24 days ago)

Post deleted by refried

Reason for deletion: .



Post Extras: Filter  Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Invisiblepablokabute
Hari ng Amag
 User Gallery


Registered: 11/22/11
Posts: 4,105
Loc: rural ghetto
Re: Turning Plants into Drug Factories [Re: refried]
    #22873969 - 02/07/16 05:19 AM (5 years, 23 days ago)

The day could soon come when patients could be taking their heart medication as a sprinkling of seeds on cereal or treating cancer with a daily cup of herbal tea.


-isn't this already what it's all about when it comes to 'alternative medicine' (original medicine) ??


--------------------

Fermented Mushrooms!!
--- https://www.shroomery.org/forums/showflat.php/Number/23378638/fpart/1/vc/1

'The second seal: “All CONTAMINATED things and events are unsatisfactory.”'



"I envy you. You North Americans are very lucky. You are fighting the most important fight of all - you live in THE HEART OF THE BEAST."

--Anonymous Guerilla, or is he..


Post Extras: Filter  Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
OfflineDr. Funtime
Stranger

Registered: 02/04/13
Posts: 39
Last seen: 7 hours, 12 minutes
Re: Turning Plants into Drug Factories [Re: refried]
    #22877241 - 02/07/16 11:46 PM (5 years, 22 days ago)

Quote:

refried said:
Quote:

Dr. Funtime said:
Quote:

Myco Dude said:
Super interesting, im glad to see gmos being developed for health instead of death.



I cant think of a single GMO being developed as a weapon or whatever it is you are trying to say.

Can you?




Since when did anyone create a secret weapon and then tell you all about it?  Do you really believe the driving force behind this type of science is to help people with AIDS in Africa?




since always and yes
Theres no point in making a super weapon then keeping it secret. That is why we told japan what was coming before it ever came. This was also the premise of the movie Dr. Strangelove.

Without modern agricultural techniques those people of Africa you hold so dear would have perished long ago. For every success however like golden rice, there is a missed opportunity like the enviropig that is blocked by paranoid people like yourself.

So again i ask, just so we are on the same page. Do you actually know of some program that is being run/has been run that intentionally does harm or are you simply assuming that it must be the case?
I also ask if you know of any unintentional harms that have been wrought by genetically modifying organisms in the lab.
Difficulty: distinguishing a difference between assholish business strategies and harm done to nature.

Also surely you can see that there is more money to be made selling people food vs killing people. The driving force behind this kind of science is money as far as I'm concerned.


Edited by Dr. Funtime (02/07/16 11:52 PM)


Post Extras: Filter  Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
OfflineMyco Dude
Stranger
Registered: 12/27/15
Posts: 85
Last seen: 4 months, 12 days
Re: Turning Plants into Drug Factories [Re: Dr. Funtime]
    #22890300 - 02/11/16 01:26 AM (5 years, 19 days ago)

[qu]Dr. Funtime said:
Quote:

refried said:
Quote:

Dr. Funtime said:
Quote:

Myco Dude said:
Super interesting, im glad to see gmos being developed for health instead of death.



I cant think of a single GMO being developed as a weapon or whatever it is you are trying to say.

Can you?




Since when did anyone create a secret weapon and then tell you all about it?  Do you really believe the driving force behind this type of science is to help people with AIDS in Africa?




since always and yes
Theres no point in making a super weapon then keeping it secret. That is why we told japan what was coming before it ever came. This was also the premise of the movie Dr. Strangelove.

Without modern agricultural techniques those people of Africa you hold so dear would have perished long ago. For every success however like golden rice, there is a missed opportunity like the enviropig that is blocked by paranoid people like yourself.

So again i ask, just so we are on the same page. Do you actually know of some program that is being run/has been run that intentionally does harm or are you simply assuming that it must be the case?
I also ask if you know of any unintentional harms that have been wrought by genetically modifying organisms in the lab.
Difficulty: distinguishing a difference between assholish business strategies and harm done to nature.

Also surely you can see that there is more money to be made selling people food vs killing people. The driving force behind this kind of science is money as far as I'm concerned.





Actually health care is one of the biggest markets in the US therefore there is a shit ton of money to be disease and sickness. That being said the majority of gmos our made to rake in profits not in the interest of mankind. For instance Monsanto's crops which typically are designed to be soaked in pesticides/herbicides. This is purely about profit not the good of plants, animals(man) or the earth.

Also modern AG is one of the most destructive and destabalizing forces on our planet. South America is believed to have had a larger population pre discovery then today. Hard to fathom because they hardly left a "footprint" over centuries and we have managed to throw the planet into a mass extinction event in less than 300 years!

Permaculture and classic breeding are the way forward-in essence we must return to "ancient" practices to move into the idealistic future.


Post Extras: Filter  Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Offlinethenutflush
Stranger

Registered: 11/12/14
Posts: 935
Last seen: 3 years, 27 days
Re: Turning Plants into Drug Factories [Re: Myco Dude]
    #22908331 - 02/15/16 06:56 PM (5 years, 15 days ago)

Does the media still refer to growhouses as "factories"? Fucking retards


Post Extras: Filter  Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Jump to top. Pages: 1

Shop: Unfolding Nature Unfolding Nature: Being in the Implicate Order   Original Sensible Seeds Autoflowering Cannabis Seeds, Bulk Cannabis Seeds, Feminized Cannabis Seeds, High THC Strains, USA West Coast Strains   PhytoExtractum Kratom Powder for Sale   Kraken Kratom Kratom Capsules for Sale, Red Vein Kratom   Bridgetown Botanicals CBD Edibles, CBD Oils   North Spore Cultivation Supplies, North Spore Mushroom Grow Kits & Cultivation Supplies   Amazon Portable Greenhouse

Feedback and Administration >> Shroomery News Service

Similar ThreadsPosterViewsRepliesLast post
* African shrub may help drug withdrawal motamanM 2,261 1 05/05/03 12:04 AM
by Hans_Moleman
* Teens Turn Legal Plant Into Dangerous Drug motamanM 5,075 17 11/25/03 09:34 AM
by EvilGir
* Drought is killing off marijuana plants Jenny 7,340 6 10/11/02 09:59 AM
by stefan
* B.C. Canada - Marijuana Factory opens! ThorA 9,135 9 10/17/02 02:05 AM
by Anonymous
* Are psychedelic drugs good for you? motamanM 5,604 6 12/03/03 06:44 AM
by sirreal
* Experts debate benefits, risks of hallucinogenic drugs motamanM 2,480 1 12/01/03 08:49 PM
by DailyPot
* Post deleted by Administrator Alien 3,847 9 09/11/03 04:27 PM
by Seuss
* Deadly 'Drug Corner' Moves to Your Computer motamanM 2,707 7 08/28/03 08:43 AM
by canid

Extra information
You cannot start new topics / You cannot reply to topics
HTML is disabled / BBCode is enabled
Moderator: motaman, veggie, karode13, Alan Rockefeller, naum, Mostly_Harmless
1,408 topic views. 2 members, 9 guests and 11 web crawlers are browsing this forum.
[ Print Topic ]
Search this thread:
MRCA Tyroler Gluckspilze
Please support our sponsors.

Copyright 1997-2021 Mind Media. Some rights reserved.

Generated in 0.034 seconds spending 0.003 seconds on 13 queries.