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OfflineCoincidentiaoppositorum
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pan foes contain psilocybin in some parts of the U.S.?
    #22115838 - 08/20/15 11:11 AM (5 years, 6 months ago)

the link from which this was copy and pasted from is near the end of the article...
In some parts of the U.S., P. foenisecii contains psilocybin, the same pyschoactive agent found in magic mushrooms. There is some evidence that P. foenisecii may be hallucinogenic.

A number of cases have been reported involving children eating P. foenisecii and apparently having hallucinations.  Mushroom poisoning expert Marilyn Shaw reports one case in which a man was mowing his lawn in Denver and found his child with "mushrooms around her mouth."  Her mother said the little girl was later "banging her head" and holding her head and was frightened of both her parents. The kid was not acting as if she had a stomach ache. At the hospital in the middle of the night, Marilyn identified the mushrooms as P. foenisecii, and the doctor administered a tranquilizer. In another case, a child at a summer camp ate about 30 mushrooms, and the counselor believed she was later hallucinating-quoted from the site below

- See more at: http://urbanmushrooms.com/index.php?id=42#.dpuf

quoted from the link above------

I have also heard many people claim that the Panaeolus foenisecii that grow in Denver contain small amounts of psilocybin...

Tyler and Smith found that this mushroom contains serotonin, 5-HTP and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid.-Wikipedia

I have taken high dose 5-HTP, and it does cause an anxious state, butterflies in the stomach, etc...something similar to mass  serotonin release, a Carcinoid syndrome type state...possibly people are mistaking these serotonergic compounds along with serotonin itself effects for mild psychedelia?

Though most reports claim that eating this mushroom produces no effects what so ever, there are reports that the pan foes from Denver and a few other areas may contain psilocin...

Unless these people are making a misidentification of pan sub or pan femicola...

What is the deal here?

Is there any conformation of this species ever producing  psilocybin?

-E. Borodin


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Re: pan foes contain psilocybin in some parts of the U.S.? [Re: Coincidentiaoppositorum]
    #22116062 - 08/20/15 12:14 PM (5 years, 6 months ago)

It sounds plausible... I'm assuming east coast because we have an abundance of pan. cinc/pan. foes for two seasons(before summer and after summer) and considering they grow together I always wonder why they're so symbiotic the only real differences being very very minor(spore color etc.)
It almost seems the mycelium from the two species could grow together. If a foe spore dropped into a network of cinc mycelium maybe it can colonize together.
I have my next project


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Re: pan foes contain psilocybin in some parts of the U.S.? [Re: dpomalia]
    #22116070 - 08/20/15 12:17 PM (5 years, 6 months ago)

And the fact that pan fem has suchhh a bell shape and its hard to say whether or not it is the same species as pan cinc with a mutation I would think they're ruled out
But I'm thinking of east coast foes cinc and fem so maybe other areas have different features...


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OfflineCoincidentiaoppositorum
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Re: pan foes contain psilocybin in some parts of the U.S.? [Re: dpomalia]
    #22120765 - 08/21/15 07:34 AM (5 years, 6 months ago)

Quote:

dpomalia said:
It sounds plausible... I'm assuming east coast because we have an abundance of pan. cinc/pan. foes for two seasons(before summer and after summer) and considering they grow together I always wonder why they're so symbiotic the only real differences being very very minor(spore color etc.)
It almost seems the mycelium from the two species could grow together. If a foe spore dropped into a network of cinc mycelium maybe it can colonize together.
I have my next project




Great idea, I have often found what looked like pan foes in a cluster of pan cinc's, it's very possible the mycelliums could be existing in the same place at the same time, maybe it's more prominent in Colorado and other specified areas that this occurs, and it's a case of misidentification due to two similar species in close proximity to one another...

Then again there is confirmed tryptamine chemistry in pan foes, and it may be possible that under certain conditions they may produce psilocybin...

I feel there is defiantly something to be looked into here...

-E. Borodin


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OfflineCoincidentiaoppositorum
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Re: pan foes contain psilocybin in some parts of the U.S.? [Re: dpomalia]
    #22120772 - 08/21/15 07:37 AM (5 years, 6 months ago)

Quote:

dpomalia said:
And the fact that pan fem has suchhh a bell shape and its hard to say whether or not it is the same species as pan cinc with a mutation I would think they're ruled out
But I'm thinking of east coast foes cinc and fem so maybe other areas have different features...




I'm unfamiliar with east coast fungi, I'm in Colorado, so I could not say...

-E. Borodin


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Re: pan foes contain psilocybin in some parts of the U.S.? [Re: dpomalia]
    #22120910 - 08/21/15 09:12 AM (5 years, 6 months ago)

Quote:

dpomalia said:
It sounds plausible... I'm assuming east coast because we have an abundance of pan. cinc/pan. foes for two seasons(before summer and after summer) and considering they grow together I always wonder why they're so symbiotic the only real differences being very very minor(spore color etc.)
It almost seems the mycelium from the two species could grow together. If a foe spore dropped into a network of cinc mycelium maybe it can colonize together.
I have my next project





We're you thinking that the two intertwined mycelliums could lead to foes containing psilocybin? Or were you saying that cinct's and foes mycelliums growing together could cause both mycelliums to fruit in the same place at the same time? 

-E. Borodin


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Re: pan foes contain psilocybin in some parts of the U.S.? [Re: Coincidentiaoppositorum]
    #22124471 - 08/21/15 10:56 PM (5 years, 6 months ago)

maybe there's anasamatosis between the species. there's fungal anasamatosis between strains of the same species sometimes, and even parasitic anasmatosis between two very different species.


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Re: pan foes contain psilocybin in some parts of the U.S.? [Re: bodhisatta]
    #22125844 - 08/22/15 09:54 AM (5 years, 6 months ago)

Very interesting...

I'm going to post a definition of what you are speaking of, as I was unfamiliar with the term, and had to look it up, and may save readers from having to look it up themselves:


In mycology, anastomosis is the fusion between branches of the same or different hyphae. Hence the bifurcating fungal hyphae can form true reticulating networks. By sharing materials in the form of dissolved ions, hormones, and nucleotides, the fungus maintains bidirectional communication with itself. The fungal network might begin from several origins; several spores (i.e. by means of conidial anastomosis tubes), several points of penetration, each a spreading circumference of absorption and assimilation. Once encountering the tip of another expanding, exploring self, the tips press against each other in pheromonal recognition or by an unknown recognition system, fusing to form a genetic singular clonal colony that can cover hectares called a genet or just microscopical areas.

For fungi, anastomosis is also a component of reproduction. In some fungi, two different haploid mating types – if compatible – merge. Somatically, they form a morphologically similar mycelial wave front that continues to grow and explore. The significant difference, is that each septated unit is binucleate, containing two unfused nuclei, i.e. one from each parent that will eventually undergo karyogamy and meiosis to complete the sexual cycle.-Wikipedia

------

Your proposed explanation is actually the best that I have heard so far, and I honestly hope you follow through with some research in the area because I think your onto something here...

-E. Borodin


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Re: pan foes contain psilocybin in some parts of the U.S.? [Re: Coincidentiaoppositorum]
    #22125855 - 08/22/15 10:00 AM (5 years, 6 months ago)

So say the pan foe hyphae bond with pan cinct hyphae, could psilocybin become a shared material between the networks?

""By sharing materials in the form of dissolved ions, hormones, and nucleotides, the fungus maintains bidirectional communication with itself.-Wikipedia""

Could psilocybin be one of these shared materials?

Sorry If my questions seem simple to you, I'm just learning all this as we speak so I'm bound to make errors occasionally, though I think I have a decent understanding of what's going on here...

-E. Borodin


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Re: pan foes contain psilocybin in some parts of the U.S.? [Re: Coincidentiaoppositorum]
    #22125867 - 08/22/15 10:03 AM (5 years, 6 months ago)

No genetics could be shared though. Alan might be someone to ask


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Re: pan foes contain psilocybin in some parts of the U.S.? [Re: bodhisatta]
    #22189721 - 09/04/15 09:23 PM (5 years, 5 months ago)

https://www.erowid.org/plants/mushrooms/mushrooms_article4.shtml

This link discusses potential activity of pan. Foes.

-E. Borodin


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Re: pan foes contain psilocybin in some parts of the U.S.? [Re: Coincidentiaoppositorum]
    #22190836 - 09/05/15 01:00 AM (5 years, 5 months ago)

Quote:

y sharing materials in the form of dissolved ions, hormones, and nucleotides, the fungus maintains bidirectional communication with itself




Yes accumulation of psilocybin and other secondary metabolites in the older cells will signal the hyphae to grow forward from the tip rather than the base.

In the case of anatomosis, If it is possible between two species, the psilocybin might be able to pass through the septum but i would expect the fungus to dispell it from the cells rather than through the cells due to it being a metabolite rather than an essential nutrient or hormone.

Many mushrooms' metabolism envolves tryptophan and depending on growth conditions the equilibrium could be shifted hard enough to create novel compounds not typically seen in the species. Some varieties might also have mutated to produce the metabolites through simple natural selection or coincidence.

Enzymes are most likely the culprit.


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Re: pan foes contain psilocybin in some parts of the U.S.? [Re: Toadstool5]
    #22190974 - 09/05/15 01:41 AM (5 years, 5 months ago)

Do you think if pan. Cincts and pan. Foes were growing in a close enough radius they could pass active compounds between the hyphe as described? 

I have a good deal of potential pan. Cinct' s and potential pan. Foe's, I keep getting black spore prints, but I have never had anybody officially confirm their identity, 4 different harvests.

http://www.shroomery.org/forums/showflat.php/Number/22105665/page/1

These are the ones I think are pan. Cinct' s

http://www.shroomery.org/forums/showflat.php/Number/22189655
These seem odd to me, and came from a slightly different area.

If I can get some confirmed pan. Foe' s, and maybe even some confirmed pan. Cinct' s, and I'm 100% on the ID, I want to test these rumours of activity, then I want the pan. Cincts for comparison, I'll have to bioassay them myself, but first I just need some confirmed samples of each species...

I have tons of suspect samples:

These all came from the same area, all had black spore prints, and are all pictured in the  ID request posts listed, none of the "odd" samples have been any where near these, so once I get an ID I may have dry samples to work with.

I think there is a potential mycological mystery here, I have heard many reports of the Denver pan. Foes causing psychedelia in children who ingested them...

Though I'm stuck trying to obtain Denver pan. Cinct' s and Denver pan foes at the moment...

Do you think they would be upset if I took them to the Colorado mycological society for an ID? Or because they are potentially active should I absolutely not do that?


-E. Borodin


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Re: pan foes contain psilocybin in some parts of the U.S.? [Re: Coincidentiaoppositorum]
    #22191031 - 09/05/15 02:05 AM (5 years, 5 months ago)

Quote:

were growing in a close enough radius they could pass active compounds between the hyphe as described?




I would think its possible because the septum between dikaryotic cells is meant to prevent larger molecules (nuclei) from passing through. Many smaller things are still able to pass through such as water.

I would think it is more likely the Foes biosynthesized the psilocybin itself. Psilocybe cubensis is sometimes not active if there is a potassium deficiency so the same may hold true for Foes. A certain substance may be needed for it to be "psilocybian" and many samples are taken in an area defficient in that substance.

I'm not very good at IDing so I couldn't help but I would explain to the Mycological society that you are investigating the toxicology of Pan Foe. and reported poisonings. Explain that you are interested in whether a misidentification led to the poisonings, if there was a transference of the toxins through anastomosis from related toxic species, or if the growth conditions contribute to a change in the tryptophan cycle.

If it is a question that can help people prevent mycointoxication and injury to children then they are the ones that should be looked at suspiciously for not helping! :mad2:


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Re: pan foes contain psilocybin in some parts of the U.S.? [Re: Toadstool5]
    #22209089 - 09/08/15 09:52 PM (5 years, 5 months ago)

This is rather antecdotal report I know.  Years ago I used to collect trash bags of poo and chunk in my yard which would result in a sea of cinctulus and just as many foes could be found on the yard.  I found a patch of foes and having that "lucky spot" mentality I took a bunch of printed them in faith even though they looked like foes, there was certainly times when suspected foes printed black.  All of them printed brown.  My asshole neighbor came over and just munched about 100 of them without asking when I was in the bathroom and said that he wasnt really sure if he was tripping but felt wierd, which is the same as saying there was no psilocybin basically.  There could have been other mildly psychedelic tryptamines though.  I think all "bloodlines" of pan foenisecci have crossed paths with active panaeolus by now, dont you?


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Re: pan foes contain psilocybin in some parts of the U.S.? [Re: stevo]
    #22210760 - 09/09/15 06:59 AM (5 years, 5 months ago)

Quote:

stevo said:
This is rather antecdotal report I know.  Years ago I used to collect trash bags of poo and chunk in my yard which would result in a sea of cinctulus and just as many foes could be found on the yard.  I found a patch of foes and having that "lucky spot" mentality I took a bunch of printed them in faith even though they looked like foes, there was certainly times when suspected foes printed black.  All of them printed brown.  My asshole neighbor came over and just munched about 100 of them without asking when I was in the bathroom and said that he wasnt really sure if he was tripping but felt wierd, which is the same as saying there was no psilocybin basically.  There could have been other mildly psychedelic tryptamines though.  I think all "bloodlines" of pan foenisecci have crossed paths with active panaeolus by now, dont you?




What state do you live in? These reports are only from very specific areas, I think it's a strange phenotype that's capable of producing actives, unfortunately none of the samples from these intoxication reports were analysed...

Pan. Foes are said to produce 5-hydroxytryptophan, though I'm not sure if this is true, how ever if it is it could very well explain your friends symptoms.

It is possible that pan. Foe and pan. Cinct growing together could be sharing chemicals via hyphae...

Though I think under certain conditions they may be able to produce active compounds...does anybody know what enzymes pan foe uses in its metabolism?

Or maybe these are cases of mistaken ID, people thought it was pan. Foe when it was in fact pan cinct.

I don't have any confirmed samples, so I can't say, and I'm not willing to ever ingest wild fungi, so unless I can find a confirm sample to send in for analysis, I guess Will not be able to know...

-E. Borodin


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Re: pan foes contain psilocybin in some parts of the U.S.? [Re: Coincidentiaoppositorum]
    #22210925 - 09/09/15 08:58 AM (5 years, 5 months ago)

I am in maryland.  The misid theory sounds pretty legit to me.


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Re: pan foes contain psilocybin in some parts of the U.S.? [Re: stevo]
    #22215827 - 09/10/15 09:59 AM (5 years, 5 months ago)

INTRODUCTION

This paper focuses on two aspects of the common gill fungus, Panaeolina foenisecii Maire: (1) biochemical, concerning its suspected psychoactive properties; and (2) ethnomycological, regarding several reports of accidental or deliberate consumption of the species.

After reviewing the existing literature describing the suspected psychoactive and/or physiological properties of Panaeolina foenisecii Maire, and its alleged production of psilocybin and/or psilocin, the authors of this paper decided to investigate three medical case histories (from Australia, Great Britain and America) involving human ingestion of this fungi. These incidents of mushroom consumption have apparently caused some alarm among mycophagists, mycologists, physicians, and parents of infant children who have purposefully or accidentally eaten P. foenisecii (for a more detailed review on the human ingestion of psilocybian fungi in Australia and New Zealand, see Allen, Merlin & Jansen 1991).

The three case histories of suspected ingestion of this species and a chronological review of the chemical analysis of P. foenisecii Maire (including a recent study carried out in Switzerland) are addressed critically in the discussion that follows.

1. Holden (1965) was the first to publish a report on a Panaeolina foenisecii poisoning of a young child (in England). Holden reported the following: "One evening last July (1965) I was phoned by the St. Albans police and asked if I would go to the city hospital to identify some fungi. A boy age three had eaten some toadstools that were growing on the lawn and was very ill with a high temperature, rapid pulse and dilated pupils though without any gastric symptoms. When I arrived at the hospital some very battered specimens were produced but these could be identified with reasonable confidence as Panaeolina foenisecii." Holden also noted that "There is no certainty that the boys illness was actually caused by eating toadstools." Furthermore Holden reported that "The child was too young for any information about hallucinations to be obtained and the case must therefore remain not proven."

In the spring of 1990, the senior author (JWA) contacted Margaret Holden, a mycologist. Holden offered the following information: "There is very little I can add about the 3-year-old boy who ate Panaeolina foenisecii at St Albans in 1965. I did not see the child and the symptoms given in my note (News Bulletin of the BMS, no. 25) were described by the doctor in charge of the case. The mother had seen the boy eating toadstools that were growing on the lawn. After taking the child to the hospital she returned home to gather up the remaining specimens, which were given to me to identify. They were all of P. foenisecii but of course there could have been other species there on the lawn such as Psilocybe semilanceata (this is common around here [St Albans] in some seasons). About a week later I received a letter from the doctor thanking me for my help and telling me that the boy had completely recovered" (Holden, 1990, Pers. Comm.).

2. In 1966, Miller (1972), was informed that a four year old American boy (location in the U.S. unknown) was rendered comatose from ingesting Panaeolina foenisecii Maire. Miller's report provided no other information regarding this alleged incident.

In January 1991, the authors contacted Miller of the (Department of Biology at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University). Miller provided the following information: "The four year old child incident occurred in 1966 in June the night before my family and I left for the Western United States. Dr. Paul Lenz a mycologist at the National Fungus Collection, now retired, called me at my home. He was not a specialist in the Agaricales and had been contacted at the Washington Children's Hospital. He was at his laboratory and had the fungus in hand. His description led me to the conclusion that it was Panaeolina foenisecii. I asked him to check the microscopic characteristics which he did to confirm my identification. He told me that the four year old boy had grazed on an unknown number of fruiting bodies. At the time that he arrived at the hospital he was comatose and his mother was really upset. However, the boy revived soon and the parents were told to keep him awake and watch him for a while. As I heard later they had no trouble keeping him awake, in fact he was super charged for the next 12 hours until the mild hallucinogen wore off!!! Of course, at the time [1966] no one had extracted the psilocybin from it [Panaeolina foenisecii] so we could only speculate that it did have the toxin in it" (Miller 1991, Pers. Comm.).

Although numerous mycologists had previously labeled Panaeolina foenisecii as edible, but not recommended for human consumption (Kreigger 1936; Bigalow 1974; Arora 1979; Dickenson & Lukas 1983; McKnight and Knight 1987), the following case history by Southcott (1974) apparently led many mycologists to label Panaeolina foenisecii as poisonous and/or hallucinogenic, and therefore a threat to children who might be more apt to accidentally consume this species (Miller 1972; Stevens & Gee 1977; Kibby 1979; Glick 1979; Cooper 1980; Smith & Weber 1980; Pacioni 1981; Courtenany & Burdsall 1982; Bassette & Sundberg 1987; Mckinny & Stuntz 1987).

3. The case that Southcott (1974) reported occurred in Campbelltown, a suburb of Australia. It concerns a young girl born on December 10, 1969. She is described as being lively spirited, with an ongoing allergic condition. Her mental distress symptoms may have resulted from the fact that she indulged in pica (one who eats dirt, grass, leaves and twigs). According to Southcott "...for some months [the young girl] had been known to have repeated episodes of hallucinations, and each attack was marked by her person being cold and clammy, with frequent bed urination. Her attacks would usually commence about six to eight hours after being allowed to play outdoors around her home, on the lawns and in the garden. In October of 1973, the mother stated that during the previous twelve months her daughter had at least a dozen such attacks, which were very frightening and distressing to the child.

Symptoms reported included: seeing colored lights on the ceiling, hallucinating cats that were not there, and feeling that she was bigger than she really was (macrosomatic delusion). An Attack usually lasted no more than four hours. Clinical records from the Adelaide Children's Hospital report the first attack as occurring when the child was about two years eight months old.

On the morning of Monday, August 14, 1972, the child awoke and was absolutely terrified and somewhat delirious. She thought that unknown things were biting her, and she reported seeing insects, spiders, and small animals such as cats, dogs, and horses in her bed. Her body was cold and clammy. She had no fever.

Her parents brought her into their bedroom and administered some Panadol and she became very twitchy and jumpy. She was kept in the house for the next two days and appeared to have recovered. On Tuesday, she remained excitable and jumpy, but ate very well, and voided frequently.

Three days after onset she was allowed outside to play with her mother watching her, but a further attack occurred that night. The following morning the child seemed well until around lunch time when, once again after playing in the garden, she became quite hysterical, screaming that things were biting her feet. After a little while, the child seemed to settle down and took a nap, but two more episodes followed before tea time. After playing fore about three-quarters of an hour she asked to go to bed. She checked under her pillow to see if any insects were in her bed.

By this time the mother had begun to take notice that these episodes always seem to occur after the child had played in the garden. Doctors asked the mother if the child had access to drugs in the home. The mother answered no. She was also asked to look for any possible toxic agents which may have been used in the garden, where a wide variety of plants grew, including Cotteneaster (with red berries), Duranta (with yellow berries), and a lilly with red seeds. On one occasion the child was observed chewing soursob (Oxalis pescaprae).

A month after onset the mother stated that her child was having attacks every three to four nights since, but that they were not nearly as severe as the first attack.

On September 19, the child experienced another attack. Medical examinations proved futile in determining the cause of her distress, and nothing neurological was found wrong with her. There were minor psychological problems between her and her mother. By December, the mother had come to the conclusion that the child's distress and discomfort was possibly caused by a species of small common mushrooms which were known to occur in the kikuyu lawn around their home. At the time this species could not be identified in Adelaide.

By March of 1973, clinical records reported that the child was still having hallucinatory attacks at least twice a week, except when she was away from home on holidays.

During all this time the child continued to have pica, which eventually decreased but was still occurring in April of 1974. At that time the mother noticed that the absence of hallucinatory attacks in the previous three months may have been due to the absence of mushrooms in the garden.

Searches around the kikuyu lawn showed the presence of several different species of grass-inhabiting mushrooms. The mother had not observed the daughter eating a fungus during the period when the child was having her symptoms. After the mother asked the child about the mushrooms, the child described them as being `yummie' and `tasty'" (Southcott 1974).

Specimens of the fungus allegedly involved in ingestions referred to above were photographed in situ, collected, and then preserved by Southcott who also again photographed them both before and after drying. In 1974, Roy Watling of the Royal Botanical Gardens of Edinburgh, Scotland visited Adelaide and identified Southcott's fungus specimens as Panaeolina foenisecii. Although Southcott believed that the evidence in this case history of fungal intoxication was circumstantial, he stated that "...it appears to be a plausible explanation for the girl's symptoms" (Specimens of P. foenisecii collected by Southcott are on deposit in the herbarium of the botanical garden of North Terrace, Adelaide 5000, South Australia).-erowid

In some parts of the U.S., P. foenisecii contains psilocybin, the same pyschoactive agent found in magic mushrooms. There is some evidence that P. foenisecii may be hallucinogenic.

A number of cases have been reported involving children eating P. foenisecii and apparently having hallucinations.  Mushroom poisoning expert Marilyn Shaw reports one case in which a man was mowing his lawn in Denver and found his child with "mushrooms around her mouth."  Her mother said the little girl was later "banging her head" and holding her head and was frightened of both her parents. The kid was not acting as if she had a stomach ache. At the hospital in the middle of the night, Marilyn identified the mushrooms as P. foenisecii, and the doctor administered a tranquilizer. In another case, a child at a summer camp ate about 30 mushrooms, and the counselor believed she was later hallucinating.

As far as adults go, we’ve had friends who’ve eaten between 5 and 25 specimens of this mushroom, they’ve either felt nothing or, as one friend told us, the psychoactive effect “made his day.”

If your pet starts acting like it's tripping, you might think about P. foenisecii. One dog owner told Marilyn Shaw that his dog seemed to be hallucinating, as it was frightened and cowering under the furniture for three days. And, sure enough, P. foenisecii grew profusely in the yard. Marilyn told the man that, for human beings, the treatment would be reassurance and a tranquilizer, if necessary.  This worked for, and Marilyn became a hero of the Capitol Hill Animal Clinic.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE TO KNOW...

This Panaeolus is common in the grass and looks fairly boring, but—in this case—looks deceive....

In some parts of the U.S., P. foenisecii contains psilocybin, the same pyschoactive agent found in magic mushrooms. There is some evidence that P. foenisecii may be hallucinogenic.

A number of cases have been reported involving children eating P. foenisecii and apparently having hallucinations.  Mushroom poisoning expert Marilyn Shaw reports one case in which a man was mowing his lawn in Denver and found his child with "mushrooms around her mouth."  Her mother said the little girl was later "banging her head" and holding her head and was frightened of both her parents. The kid was not acting as if she had a stomach ache. At the hospital in the middle of the night, Marilyn identified the mushrooms as P. foenisecii, and the doctor administered a tranquilizer. In another case, a child at a summer camp ate about 30 mushrooms, and the counselor believed she was later hallucinating.

As far as adults go, we’ve had friends who’ve eaten between 5 and 25 specimens of this mushroom, they’ve either felt nothing or, as one friend told us, the psychoactive effect “made his day.”

If your pet starts acting like it's tripping, you might think about P. foenisecii. One dog owner told Marilyn Shaw that his dog seemed to be hallucinating, as it was frightened and cowering under the furniture for three days. And, sure enough, P. foenisecii grew profusely in the yard. Marilyn told the man that, for human beings, the treatment would be reassurance and a tranquilizer, if necessary.  This worked for, and Marilyn became a hero of the Capitol Hill Animal Clinic

http://urbanmushrooms.com/index.php?id=42

In this link it says "In some parts of the U.S., P. foenisecii contains psilocybin, the same pyschoactive agent found in magic mushrooms" in the "you may also like to know box"


ust about everyone has seen this mushroom at one time or another. It is one of the most common and widely distributed lawn mushrooms in North America, and it often fruits in large numbers. Some people are upset by this; I often receive e-mails from people wanting to know how Panaeolus foenesecii or some other lawn mushroom can be eradicated. I wonder whether these people would go to BaldEagleExpert.Com and ask for instructions on shooting Haliaeetus leucocephalus? Anyway, the short answer is: you can't get rid of them. If you are worried about mushrooms ruining the appearance of your lawn, I suggest you rethink your priorities in life. But if you are worried about your toddler popping a poisonous mushroom in her mouth, I salute your concern--though you're still not going to have any luck getting rid of the mushrooms. The best solution in this case is to teach your children not to eat everything they see--and if they aren't learning this lesson well, not to leave them unsupervised on your lawn in the summer.

The lawn mower's mushroom, in fact, may well be dangerous for toddlers, since it is known in some instances to contain small amounts of psilocybin. Chemical analysis has revealed this hallucinogen in some collections from some parts of North America. Elsewhere, the mushrooms appear to be inactive. -mushroomexpert.com

There's several cases, can these really all be misidentification?

We're the samples that tested positive for psilocin all misidentification?

I think it's more likely that there is a phenotype that only grows in certain places that produces the compound, such as Denver, England, and other locations mentioned in the reports or where samples were tested from.

I don't think misidentification is very likely...

I have also heard this fungi produces 5-hydroxytryptophan, which in high dose will cause anxiety, butterflies in the stomach, carcinoid flush type symptoms...maybe people are mistaking these symptoms for psilocin intoxication? Though samples did test positive for psilocin, and bufotenine (5-ho-DMT) has also been suspected.

I feel there is something going on here, and the sooner it gets figured out the safer we can all be, though you should probably keep your children and toddlers away from all mushrooms...


-E. Borodin


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OfflineCoincidentiaoppositorum
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Re: pan foes contain psilocybin in some parts of the U.S.? [Re: Coincidentiaoppositorum]
    #22215871 - 09/10/15 10:10 AM (5 years, 5 months ago)

I've been finding what I think are Panaeolus cinctulus, but most say the look like pan. Foe, though the spore print is jet black...maybe there is a phenotype of Panaeolus cinctulus that just looks more like a pan. Foe than in other places, and this is why these mix ups only occur in those areas...

-E. Borodin


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