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InvisiblePsiloKitten
Ganja Goddess

Registered: 02/13/99
Posts: 1,617
An Open Letter to the Corporations of America
    #2043387 - 10/26/03 01:58 AM (13 years, 1 month ago)

Today, March 22, 1969, in the Washington office of the Dow Chemical Company we spill human blood and destroy files and office equipment. By this action, we condemn you, the Dow Chemical Company, and all similar American Corporations.
We are outraged by the death-dealing exploitation of people of the Third World, and of all the poor and powerless who are victimized by your profit-seeking ventures. Considering it our responsibility to respond, we deny the right of your faceless and inhuman corporation to exist:

You, corporations, who under the cover stockholder and executive anonymity, exploit, deprive, dehumanize and kill in search of profit;

you, corporations, who contain (or control) Americans and exploit their exaggerated need for security that you have helped create;

you, corporations, who numb our sensitivity to persons, and capitalize on our concern for things.

Specifically, we warn you, Dow Chemical Company, that we will no longer tolerate your refusal to accept responsibility for your programmed destruction of human life.

You, stockholders and company executives alike, are so willing to seek profit in the production of napalm, defoliants, nerve gas, as in the same spirit you co-operated with the I. G. Farben Company, a chemical manufacturer in Nazi Germany, during the Second World War.

You, who without concern for development for other nations or for their rights of self-determination, maintain 100% control over subsidiaries in more than twenty nations.

You, who in the interest of profit, seek to make it in the military interest of the United States to suppress the legitimate national desires of other peoples. Your product is death, your market is war.

Your offices have lost their right to exist. It is a blow for justice that we strike today.

In your mad pursuit of profit, you and others like you, are causing the psychological and physical destruction of mankind. We urge all to join us as we say "no" to this madness.

(Signed) Rev. Robert Begin, Rev. Bernard Meyer, Rev. Joseph O'Rourke, S.J., Rev. Dennis Maloney, Mr. Michael Sasaki, Rev. Michael Dougherty, S.J., Sr. Joann Malone, SAM, Rev. Arthur Melville, Mrs. Catherine Melville.

Statement of the D. C. 9
Dow Chemical was one company profiting from the use of napalm against the people of Vietnam. A group of activist religious leaders attacked Dow's corporate offices. This is their statement of condemnation of corporate irresponsibility.




My comment--When will we start taking action against Lockheed Martin? Halliburton? The Carlysle Group? etc?


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InvisiblePsiloKitten
Ganja Goddess

Registered: 02/13/99
Posts: 1,617
Re: An Open Letter to the Corporations of America [Re: PsiloKitten]
    #2043503 - 10/26/03 01:40 AM (13 years, 1 month ago)

Isla Vista Student Riots
(1970)

More than 1,000 kids seized a three-block business district in a student neighborhood near the University of California at Santa Barbara wednesday night, Feb. 25, held it from police for six hours, smashed windows, set fire to a police car, and burned a plush Bank of America office to the ground doing more than a quarter of a million dollars damage to the bank alone.
Five hundred national guardsmen were called out Friday, Feb. 27, and another 2,500 placed on standby alert after students drove 300 police out of their neighborhood three nights in a row. Two inches of rain plus a student decision not to fight the Guard quieted the area Friday and Saturday nights. "We don't have any quarrel with them," a spokesman said.

But sheriff's officers worried that renewed demonstrations would follow the pull-out of the Guard on Sunday and Monday. "It scares me," said Sheriff Lieut. William Chickering. "We've been told that the demonstrators are going to wait until the National Guard pulls out and do it to us again."

A total of 141 persons were arrested In five nights. At least 34 policemen were injured. Other casualties Included a 35 year-old university employee, who was shot in the shoulder when he accidentally drove through a police roadblock, and a 21-year-old student, who was hospitalized after being run down by a police car thursday night.

Gov. Ronald Reagan flew to Santa Barbara on Thursday morning. He called the demonstrators "cowardly little bums," declared a "state of extreme emergency," and placed National Guard units on alert. He also said he would declare martial law if necessary. County officials ordered a 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew, and police were ordered to "prohibit loitering on public streets" and to "break up assemblies of more than three persons."

Students defied the orders, and a combined force of 300 police, California Highway Patrolmen and sheriffs deputies was gathered from three counties Thursday night. They fought students for six hours and were forced to withdraw at 11:30 p.m.

The most spectacular destruction occurred Wednesday night. One thousand demonstrators began pelting sheriff's cars with rocks. At 9:45 p.m. they captured one car, forcing two deputies to flee and then setting the car afire. The flames were 30 feet high. Windows were smashed; the plywood used to board up the Bank of America's windows, smashed the day before, was torn down and set afire; demonstrators then surged into the bank.

An observer said that the group inside "hurled chairs into windows, overturned desks, created snowfalls of envelopes from an upstairs office and tore up anything they could reach." Then some people got a big trashcan, set it on fire, and ran it through the front doors and pushed it against the drappery.

The police were informed that a manager was inside the burning bank. Seventy sheriff's deputies, in full riot gear, were sent to free the manager, but when they arrived they found they had fallen into a trap. There was no manager inside but there were hundreds of students surrounding the cops, throwing rocks.

The police fought their way out and withdrew completely, surrendering the area to the students until 2:15 a.m., when a force of 240 cops returned to clear the streets.

After the police withdrawal, firemen were unable to reach the bank. Some fraternity members tried to put out the fire, but it was ignited again and the whole place was gone in 45 minutes. Afew charred beams were all that remained the next morning, bank officials said $275,000 damage was done.

One veteran radical said, "While the students heId the shopping center, there wasn't an atmosphere of 'wild in the streets.' The group was calm and highly political --explicitly anti-capitaltst. Targets of window-breaking were chosen carefully: the Bank, the real estate offices which gouge students on rents, and the gas stations whose companies pollute Santa Barbara Bay with oil seepages. Small businesses were not touched."

The business district that was seized and held from police on three consecutive nights lies in the heart of Isla Vista, a suburb of Santa Barbara, with a population of 13,000. Of these, 9,000 are students of the University of California branch here.

The students had been united by a series of on-campus demonstrations which began in January, when Bill Allen, a popular anthropology professor, was denied tenure. Three-fourths of the school's 14,000 students took part in one demonstration or another. Two-thirds of the student body signed a petition in support of Allen.

"This was the first time radical politics made an appearance at the University of California at Santa Barbara," one veteran radical said. "In the campus demonstrations there was a feeling of the early sixties --they were non-violent and not confrontation demonstrations."

In spite of the peaceful character of the campus demonstrations, police arrested 19 people, dragging many of them out of bed in the middle of the night. The demand to re-hire Allen was not met and a massive residue of frustration and hostility to the police was left.

The Chicago conspiracy defendants became immensely popular among Santa Barbara students. Tom Hayden gave a speech at the University in early January, drawing an enthusiastic crowd of 1,200, the largest audience ever assembled fora political event on the campus up to that time. In February, the official student government invited Defense Attorney William Kunstler to speak on campus, offering him $2,000 of student funds, plus a percentage of the gate, plus a passing of the hat. He appeared Wednesday afternoon, February 25, in the football stadium, where 7,000 people paid 50 cents each to hear him.

The night after his speech the bank was burned. Gov. Reagan suggested that Kunstler had violated the "Rap Brown act" - saying he crossed a state line to incite violence (this is the law the Chicago defendants were convicted under).

Student leaders pleaded with newsmen not to say Kunstler incited the violence, pointing out that the windows of the bank had been broken the night before his appearance on campus.

The Bank of America, whose offices have been attacked during the past week in Berkeley, San Francisco and Los Angeles, has offered a $25,000 reward for the Santa Barbara arsonists. Board Chairman Louis B. Lundborg reported that "we have not been able to open the vault doors since the fire, but we assume that the bank's funds and records are safe." He said the bank was "proud to be a symbol of the establishment in the real sense of that word: established law and order, established orderly process."

Source: Madison Kaleidoscope 3/18/70


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InvisiblePsiloKitten
Ganja Goddess

Registered: 02/13/99
Posts: 1,617
Re: An Open Letter to the Corporations of America [Re: PsiloKitten]
    #2043555 - 10/26/03 01:55 AM (13 years, 1 month ago)

Let Us Shape the Future (1965)

Seven months ago at the April March on Washington, Paul Potter, then President of Students for a Democratic Society, stood in approximately this spot and said that we must name the system that creates and sustains the war in Vietnam - name it, describe it, analyze it, understand it, and change it.

Today I will try to name it - to suggest an analysis which, to be quite frank, may disturb some of you ? and to suggest what changing it may require of us.

We are here again to protest a growing war. Since it is a very bad war, we acquire the habit of thinking it must be caused by very bad men. But we only conceal reality, I think, to denounce on such grounds the menacing coalition of industrial and military power, or the brutality of the blitzkrieg we are waging against Vietnam, or the ominous signs around us that heresy may soon no longer be permitted. We must simply observe, and quite plainly say, that this coalition, this blitzkrieg, and this demand for acquiescence are creatures, all of them, of a Government that since 1932 has considered itself to he fundamentally liberal.

The original commitment in Vietnam was made by President Truman, a mainstream liberal. It was seconded by President Eisenhower, a moderate liberal. It was intensified by the late President Kennedy, a flaming liberal. Think of the men who now engineer that war ? those who study the maps, give the commands, push the buttons, and tally the dead: Bundy, McNamara, Rusk, Lodge, Goldberg, the President himself. They are not moral monsters. They are all honorable men. They are all liberals.

But so, I'm sure, are many of us who are here today in protest. To understand the war, then, it seems necessary to take a closer look at this American liberalism. Maybe we are in for some surprises. Maybe we have here two quite different liberalisms: one authentically humanist; the other not so human at all.

Not long ago I considered myself a liberal and if, someone had asked me what I meant by that, I'd perhaps have quoted Thomas Jefferson or Thomas Paine, who first made plain our nation's unprovisional commitment to human rights. But what do you think would happen if these two heroes could sit down now for a chat with President Johnson and McGeorge Bundy?

They would surely talk of the Vietnam war. Our dead revolutionaries would soon wonder why their country was fighting against what appeared to be a revolution. The living liberals would hotly deny that it is one: there are troops coming in from outside, the rebels get arms from other countries, most of the people are not on their side, and they practice terror against their own. Therefore: not a revolution.

What would our dead revolutionaries answer? They might say: "What fools and bandits, sirs, you make then of us. Outside help? Do you remember Lafayette? Or the three thousand British freighters the French navy sunk for our side? Or the arms and men, we got from France and Spain? And what's this about terror? Did you never hear what we did to our own Loyalists? Or about the thousands of rich American Tories who fled for their lives to Canada? And as for popular support, do you not know that we had less than one-third of our people with us? That, in fact, the colony of New York recruited more troops for the British than for the revolution? Should we give it all back?"

Revolutions do not take place in velvet boxes. They never have. It is only the poets who make them lovely. What the National Liberation Front is fighting in Vietnam is a complex and vicious war. This war is also a revolution, as honest a revolution as you can find anywhere in history. And this is a fact which all our intricate official denials will never change.

But it doesn't make any difference to our leaders anyway. Their aim in Vietnam is really much simpler than this implies. It is to safeguard what they take to be American interests around the world against revolution or revolutionary change, which they always call Communism - as if that were that. In the case of Vietnam, this interest is, first, the principle that revolution shall not be tolerated anywhere, and second, that South Vietnam shall never sell its rice to China - or even to North Vietnam.

There is simply no such thing now, for us, as a just revolution - never mind that for two‑thirds of the world's people the Twentieth Century might as well be the Stone Age; never mind the melting poverty and hopelessness that are the basic facts of life for most modern men; and never mind that for these millions there is now an increasingly perceptible relationship between their sorrow and our contentment.

Can we understand why the Negroes of Watts rebelled? Then why do we need a devil theory to explain the rebellion of the South Vietnamese? Can we understand the oppression in Mississippi, or the anguish that our Northern ghettoes makes epidemic? Then why can't we see that our proper human struggle is not with Communism or revolutionaries, but with the social desperation that drives good men to violence, both here and abroad?

To be sure, we have been most generous with our aid, and in Western Europe, a mature industrial society, that aid worked. But there are always political and financial strings. And we have never shown ourselves capable of allowing others to make those traumatic institutional changes that are often the prerequisites of progress in colonial societies. For all our official feeling for the millions who are enslaved to what we so self‑righteously call the yoke of Communist tyranny, we make no real effort at all to crack through the much more vicious right‑wing tyrannies that our businessmen traffic with and our nation profits from every day. And for all our cries about the international Red conspiracy to take over the world, we take only pride in the fact of our six thousand military bases on foreign soil.

We gave Rhodesia a grave look just now - but we keep on buying her chromium, which is cheap because black slave labor mines it.

We deplore the racism of Verwoert's fascist South Africa - but our banks make big loans to that country and our private technology makes it a nuclear power.

We are saddened and puzzled by random backpage stories of revolt in this or that Latin American state - but are convinced by a few pretty photos in the Sunday supplement that things are getting better, that the world is coming our way, that change from disorder can be orderly, that our benevolence will pacify the distressed, that our might will intimidate the angry.

Optimists, may I suggest that these are quite unlikely fantasies? They are fantasies because we have lost that mysterious social desire for human equity that from time to time has given us genuine moral drive. We have become a nation of young, bright-eyed, hard-hearted, slim-waisted, bullet-headed make-out artists. A nation - may I say it? - of beardless liberals.

You say I am being hard? Only think.

This country, with its thirty-some years of liberalism can send 200,000 young men to Vietnam to kill and die in the most dubious of wars, but it cannot get 100 voter registrars to go into Mississippi.

What do you make of it?

The financial burden of the war obliges us to cut millions from an already pathetic War on Poverty budget. But in almost the same breath, Congress appropriates one hundred forty million dollars for the Lockheed and Boeing companies to compete with each other on the supersonic transport project‑that Disneyland creation that will cost us all about two billion dollars before it's done.

What do you make of it?

Many of us have been earnestly resisting for some years now the idea of putting atomic weapons into West German hands, an action that would perpetuate the division of Europe and thus the Cold War. Now just this week we find out that, with the meagerest of security systems, West Germany has had nuclear weapons in her hands for the past six years.

What do you make of it?

Some will make of it that I overdraw the matter. Many will ask: What about the other side? To be sure, there is the bitter ugliness of Czechoslovakia, Poland, those infamous Russian tanks in the streets of Budapest. But my anger only rises to hear some say that sorrow cancels sorrow, or that this one's shame deposits in that one's account the right to shamefulness.

And others will make of it that I sound mighty anti-American. To these, I say: Don't blame me for that! Blame those who mouthed my liberal values and broke my American heart.

Just who might they be, by the way? Let's take a brief factual inventory of the latter-day Cold War.

In 1953 our Central Intelligence Agency managed to overthrow Mossadegh in Iran, the complaint being his neutralism in the Cold War and his plans to nationalize the country's oil resources to improve his people's lives. Most evil aims, most evil man. In his place we put in General Zahedi, a World War II Nazi collaborator. New arrangements on Iran's oil gave twenty-five year leases on forty per cent of it to three U.S. firms, one of which was Gulf Oil. The C.I.A.'s leader for this coup was Kermit Roosevelt. In 1960, Kermit Roosevelt became a vice president of Gulf Oil.

In 1954, the democratically elected Arbenz of Guatemala wanted to nationalize a portion of United Fruit Company's plantations in his country, land he needed badly for a modest program of agrarian reform. His government was overthrown in a C.I.A.-supported rightwing coup. The following year, Gen. Walter Bedell Smith, director of the C.I.A. when the Guatemala venture was being planned, joined the board of directors of the United Fruit Company.

Comes 1960 and Castro cries we are about to invade Cuba. The Administration sneers, "poppycock," and we Americans believe it. Comes 1961 and the invasion. Comes with it the awful realization that the United States Government had lied.

Comes 1962 and the missile crisis, and our Administration stands prepared to fight global atomic war on the curious principle that another state does not have the right to its own foreign policy.

Comes 1963 and British Guiana where Cheddi Jagan wants independence from England and a labor law modeled on the Wagner Act. And Jay Lovestone, the AFL-CIO foreign policy chief, acting, as always, quite independently of labor's rank and file, arranges with our Government to finance an eleven-week dock strike that brings Jagan down, ensuring that the state will remain British Guiana, and that any workingman who wants a wage better than fifty cents a day is a dupe of Communism.

Comes 1964. Two weeks after Undersecretary Thomas Mann announces that we have abandoned the Alianza's principle of no aid to tyrants, Brazil's Goulart is overthrown by the vicious right‑winger, Ademar Barros, supported by a show of American gunboats at Rio de Janeiro. Within twenty four hours, the new head of state, Mazzilli, receives a congratulatory wire from our President.

Comes 1965. The Dominican Republic. Rebellion in the streets. We scurry to the spot with twenty thousand neutral Marines and our neutral peacemakers - like Ellsworth Bunker Jr., Ambassador to the Organization of American States. Most of us know that our neutral Marines fought openly on the side of the junta, a fact that the Administration still denies. But how many also know that what was at stake was our new Caribbean Sugar Bowl? That this same neutral peacemaking Bunker is a board member and stock owner of the National Sugar Refining Company, a firm his father founded in the good old days, and one which has a major interest in maintaining the status quo in the Dominican Republic? Or that the President's close personal friend and advisor, our new Supreme Court Justice Abe Fortas, has sat for the past 19 years on the board of the Sucrest Company, which imports blackstrap molasses from the Dominican Republic? Or that the rhetorician of corporate liberalism and the late President Kennedy's close friend Adolf Berle, was chairman of that same board? Or that our roving ambassador Averill Harriman's brother Roland is on the board of National Sugar? Or that our former ambassador to the Dominican Republic, Joseph Farland, is a board member of the South Puerto Rico Sugar Co., which owns two hundred and seventy‑five thousand acres of rich land in the Dominican Republic and is the largest employer on the island - at about one dollar a day?

Neutralists! God save the hungry people of the world from such neutralists!

We do not say these men are evil. We say, rather, that good men can be divided from their compassion by the institutional system that inherits us all. Generation in and out, we are put to use. People become instruments. Generals do not hear the screams of the bombed; sugar executives do not see the misery of the cane cutters: for to do so is to be that much less the general, that much less the executive.

The foregoing facts of recent history describe one main aspect of the estate of Western liberalism. Where is our American humanism here? What went wrong?

Let's stare our situation coldly in the face. All of us are born to the colossus of history, our American corporate system - in many ways an awesome organism. There is one fact that describes it: With about five per cent of the world's people, we consume about half the world's goods. We take a richness that is in good part not our own, and we put it in our pockets, our garages, our split-levels, our bellies, and our futures.

On the face of it, it is a crime that so few should have so much at the expense of so many. Where is the moral imagination so abused as to call this just? Perhaps many of us feel a bit uneasy in our sleep. We are not, after all, a cruel people. And perhaps we don't really need this super-dominance that deforms others. But what can we do? The investments are made. The financial ties are established. The plants abroad are built. Our system exists. One is swept up into it. How intolerable - to be born moral, but addicted to a stolen and maybe surplus luxury. Our goodness threatens to become counterfeit before our eyes - unless we change. But change threatens us with uncertainty - at least.

Our problem, then, is to justify this system and give its theft another name - to make kind and moral what is neither, to perform some alchemy with language that will make this injustice seem a most magnanimous gift.

A hard problem. But the Western democracies, in the heyday of their colonial expansionism, produced a hero worthy of the task.

Its name was free enterprise, and its partner was an illiberal liberalism that said to the poor and the dispossessed: What we acquire of your resources we repay in civilization: the white man's burden. But this was too poetic. So a much more hardheaded theory was produced. This theory said that colonial status is in fact a boon to the colonized. We give them technology and bring them into modem times.

But this deceived no one but ourselves. We were delighted with this new theory. The poor saw in it merely an admission that their claims were irrefutable. They stood up to us, without gratitude. We were shocked - but also confused, for the poor seemed again to be right. How long is it going to be the case, we wondered, that the poor will be right and the rich will be wrong?

Liberalism faced a crisis. In the face of the collapse of the European empires, how could it continue, to hold together, our twin need for richness and righteousness? How can we continue to sack the ports of Asia and still dream of Jesus?

The challenge was met with a most ingenious solution: the ideology of anti-Communism. This was the bind: we cannot call revolution bad, because we started that way ourselves, and because it is all too easy to see why the dispossessed should rebel. So we will call revolution Communism. And we will reserve for ourselves the right to say what Communism means. We take note of revolution's enormities, wrenching them where necessary from their historical context and often exaggerating them, and say: Behold, Communism is a bloodbath. We take note of those reactionaries who stole the revolution, and say: Behold, Communism is a betrayal of the people. We take note of the revolution's need to consolidate itself, and say: Behold, Communism is a tyranny.

It has been all these things, and it will be these things again, and we will never be at a loss for those tales of atrocity that comfort us so in our self-righteousness. Nuns will be raped and bureaucrats will be disembowelled. Indeed, revolution is a fury. For it is a letting loose of outrages pent up sometimes over centuries. But the more brutal and longer-lasting the suppression of this energy, all the more ferocious will be its explosive release.

Far from helping Americans deal with this truth, the anti‑Communist ideology merely tries to disguise it so that things may stay the way they are. Thus, it depicts our presence in other lands not as a coercion, but a protection. It allows us even to say that the napalm in Vietnam is only another aspect of our humanitarian love - like those exorcisms in the Middle Ages that so often killed the patient. So we say to the Vietnamese peasant, the Cuban intellectual, the Peruvian worker: "You are better dead than Red. If it hurts or if you don't understand why - sorry about that."

This is the action of corporate liberalism. It performs for the corporate state a function quite like what the Church once performed for the feudal state. It seeks to justify its burdens and protect it from change. As the Church exaggerated this office in the Inquisition, so with liberalism in the McCarthy time - which, if it was a reactionary phenomenon, was still made possible by our anti-communist corporate liberalism.

Let me then speak directly to humanist liberals. If my facts are wrong, I will soon be corrected. But if they are right, then you may face a crisis of conscience. Corporatism or humanism: which? For it has come to that. Will you let your dreams be used? Will you be a grudging apologist for the corporate state? Or will you help try to change it - not in the name of this or that blueprint or ism, but in the name of simple human decency and democracy and the vision that wise and brave men saw in the time of our own Revolution?

And if your commitment to human values is unconditional, then disabuse yourselves of the notion that statements will bring change, if only the right statements can be written, or that interviews with the mighty will bring change if only the mighty can be reached, or that marches will bring change if only we can make them massive enough, or that policy proposals will bring change if only we can make them responsible enough.

We are dealing now with a colossus that does not want to be changed. It will not change itself. It will not cooperate with those who want to change it. Those allies of ours in the Government - are they really our allies? If they are, then they don't need advice, they need constituencies; they don't need study groups, they need a movement. And it they are not, then all the more reason for building that movement with the most relentless conviction.

There are people in this country today who are trying to build that movement, who aim at nothing less than a humanist reformation. And the humanist liberals must understand that it is this movement with which their own best hopes are most in tune. We radicals know the same history that you liberals know, and we can understand your occasional cynicism, exasperation, and even distrust. But we ask you to put these aside and help us risk a leap. Help us find enough time for the enormous work that needs doing here. Help us build. Help us shape the future in the name of plain human hope.

*speech by Carl Oglesby

Are we living in the past?


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Invisibleluvdemshrooms
Two inch dick..but it spins!?


Registered: 11/29/01
Posts: 33,808
Loc: Lost In Space
Re: An Open Letter to the Corporations of America [Re: PsiloKitten]
    #2044100 - 10/26/03 06:24 AM (13 years, 1 month ago)

:lol:


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You cannot legislate the poor into prosperity by legislating the wealthy out of prosperity. What one person receives without working for another person must work for without receiving. The government cannot give to anybody anything that the government does not first take from somebody else. When half of the people get the idea that they do not have to work because the other half is going to take care of them and when the other half gets the idea that it does no good to work because somebody else is going to get what they work for that my dear friend is the beginning of the end of any nation. You cannot multiply wealth by dividing it. ~ Adrian Rogers


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OfflineBaby_Hitler
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Re: An Open Letter to the Corporations of America [Re: PsiloKitten]
    #2044116 - 10/26/03 06:53 AM (13 years, 1 month ago)

Did you post these as examples of "linguistic inflation"?


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InvisiblePsiloKitten
Ganja Goddess

Registered: 02/13/99
Posts: 1,617
Re: An Open Letter to the Corporations of America [Re: Baby_Hitler]
    #2044840 - 10/26/03 03:39 PM (13 years, 1 month ago)

Nope,
As examples of true patriotism. You wouldnt be familiar with that.


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InvisibleXlea321
Stranger
Registered: 02/26/01
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Re: An Open Letter to the Corporations of America [Re: luvdemshrooms]
    #2049505 - 10/28/03 02:56 AM (13 years, 1 month ago)

Any chance of our friendly neighbourhood Bush supporters addressing a point in the posts rather than posting the same old drivel?


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Don't worry, B. Caapi


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Invisibleluvdemshrooms
Two inch dick..but it spins!?


Registered: 11/29/01
Posts: 33,808
Loc: Lost In Space
Re: An Open Letter to the Corporations of America [Re: Xlea321]
    #2049714 - 10/28/03 05:31 AM (13 years, 1 month ago)

I don't know. You'd have to ask one. I merely point out the flaws, inconsistancies and bullshit in what people like you say. Not surprising you'd mistake that for support of Bush.

A more interesting question would be.... do you plan to start being honest someday?


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You cannot legislate the poor into prosperity by legislating the wealthy out of prosperity. What one person receives without working for another person must work for without receiving. The government cannot give to anybody anything that the government does not first take from somebody else. When half of the people get the idea that they do not have to work because the other half is going to take care of them and when the other half gets the idea that it does no good to work because somebody else is going to get what they work for that my dear friend is the beginning of the end of any nation. You cannot multiply wealth by dividing it. ~ Adrian Rogers


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OfflineGazzBut
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Re: An Open Letter to the Corporations of America [Re: luvdemshrooms]
    #2049753 - 10/28/03 06:17 AM (13 years, 1 month ago)

Quote:

I don't know. You'd have to ask one. I merely point out the flaws, inconsistancies and bullshit in what people like you say. Not surprising you'd mistake that for support of Bush.




Yeah  but all you actually said was... :lol: that really highlights flaws and inconsistencies doesnt it?

Then you revert to type with a personal attack on Alex. Weak, but not unexpected. 


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Always Smi2le


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InvisibleXlea321
Stranger
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Re: An Open Letter to the Corporations of America [Re: luvdemshrooms]
    #2050478 - 10/28/03 02:11 PM (13 years, 1 month ago)

I don't know. You'd have to ask one. I merely point out the flaws, inconsistancies and bullshit in what people like you say.

And you think that means posting a smiley face?

Not surprising you'd mistake that for support of Bush.

Did you vote for him or not?

A more interesting question would be

Reverting back to type I see..


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Don't worry, B. Caapi


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Invisibleluvdemshrooms
Two inch dick..but it spins!?


Registered: 11/29/01
Posts: 33,808
Loc: Lost In Space
Re: An Open Letter to the Corporations of America [Re: GazzBut]
    #2050899 - 10/28/03 04:57 PM (13 years, 1 month ago)

Quote:

GazzBut said:
Quote:

I don't know. You'd have to ask one. I merely point out the flaws, inconsistancies and bullshit in what people like you say. Not surprising you'd mistake that for support of Bush.




Yeah  but all you actually said was... :lol: that really highlights flaws and inconsistencies doesnt it?

Then you revert to type with a personal attack on Alex. Weak, but not unexpected.   



Actually the  :lol: was for the article, the following statement was for our dishonest companion.


--------------------
You cannot legislate the poor into prosperity by legislating the wealthy out of prosperity. What one person receives without working for another person must work for without receiving. The government cannot give to anybody anything that the government does not first take from somebody else. When half of the people get the idea that they do not have to work because the other half is going to take care of them and when the other half gets the idea that it does no good to work because somebody else is going to get what they work for that my dear friend is the beginning of the end of any nation. You cannot multiply wealth by dividing it. ~ Adrian Rogers


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Invisibleluvdemshrooms
Two inch dick..but it spins!?


Registered: 11/29/01
Posts: 33,808
Loc: Lost In Space
Re: An Open Letter to the Corporations of America [Re: Xlea321]
    #2050905 - 10/28/03 04:59 PM (13 years, 1 month ago)

Quote:

Alex123 said:
I don't know. You'd have to ask one. I merely point out the flaws, inconsistancies and bullshit in what people like you say.

And you think that means posting a smiley face?



See above.


Quote:

Not surprising you'd mistake that for support of Bush.

Did you vote for him or not?



You're well aware I did. He was the best choice then, he is now.

Quote:

A more interesting question would be

Reverting back to type I see..



Pot + kettle + black, add them up, you get Alpo.


--------------------
You cannot legislate the poor into prosperity by legislating the wealthy out of prosperity. What one person receives without working for another person must work for without receiving. The government cannot give to anybody anything that the government does not first take from somebody else. When half of the people get the idea that they do not have to work because the other half is going to take care of them and when the other half gets the idea that it does no good to work because somebody else is going to get what they work for that my dear friend is the beginning of the end of any nation. You cannot multiply wealth by dividing it. ~ Adrian Rogers


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InvisibleXlea321
Stranger
Registered: 02/26/01
Posts: 9,134
Re: An Open Letter to the Corporations of America [Re: luvdemshrooms]
    #2052662 - 10/29/03 03:12 AM (13 years, 1 month ago)

Actually the was for the article

Yes, we're aware of that. We're just questioning why on earth bother posting it.

Make a point, address the issues.


--------------------
Don't worry, B. Caapi


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Invisibleluvdemshrooms
Two inch dick..but it spins!?


Registered: 11/29/01
Posts: 33,808
Loc: Lost In Space
Re: An Open Letter to the Corporations of America [Re: Xlea321]
    #2052916 - 10/29/03 05:45 AM (13 years, 1 month ago)

Quote:

Yes, we're aware of that.



Right.


Quote:

We're just questioning why on earth bother posting it.


Pot + kettle + black, add them up, you get Alpo.

Tell you what Alpo, I'll make a deal with you.

You stop fabricating, distorting, exaggerating, evading, redefining, being a hypocrite, and outright lying, and I'll stop responding with  :lol:

Or you could put me on ignore. Either way it doesn't matter to me.


Quote:

Make a point, address the issues.



Actually, I did both, just not in a manner which apparently suits you.
Well tough shit. Get over it.


--------------------
You cannot legislate the poor into prosperity by legislating the wealthy out of prosperity. What one person receives without working for another person must work for without receiving. The government cannot give to anybody anything that the government does not first take from somebody else. When half of the people get the idea that they do not have to work because the other half is going to take care of them and when the other half gets the idea that it does no good to work because somebody else is going to get what they work for that my dear friend is the beginning of the end of any nation. You cannot multiply wealth by dividing it. ~ Adrian Rogers


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InvisibleXlea321
Stranger
Registered: 02/26/01
Posts: 9,134
Re: An Open Letter to the Corporations of America [Re: luvdemshrooms]
    #2054106 - 10/29/03 05:57 PM (13 years, 1 month ago)

Yet again not a single remark on the issues raised by Psilo's thread. Just the same tired old flames you have repeated hundreds of times for months.

Why not simply stay out of threads you are unable to add anything to?



--------------------
Don't worry, B. Caapi


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Invisibleluvdemshrooms
Two inch dick..but it spins!?


Registered: 11/29/01
Posts: 33,808
Loc: Lost In Space
Re: An Open Letter to the Corporations of America [Re: Xlea321]
    #2054145 - 10/29/03 06:14 PM (13 years, 1 month ago)

Quote:

Alex123 said:
Yet again not a single remark on the issues raised by Psilo's thread. Just the same tired old flames you have repeated hundreds of times for months.

Why not simply stay out of threads you are unable to add anything to?

 



So the above added how? And if you find it helpful I'd be glad to go back and paste some of your posts and comments which added nothing. All you need to do is ask. I suspect you know I'll have no trouble finding them

I'll repeat this again for you....
Pot + kettle + black = Alpo.

It's a simple formula, I don't see why you seem unable to grasp it.

Now slo-mo, I'll say this again.....
Quote:


Tell you what Alpo, I'll make a deal with you.

You stop fabricating, distorting, exaggerating, evading, redefining, being a hypocrite, and outright lying, and I'll stop responding with  :lol:

Or you could put me on ignore. Either way it doesn't matter to me.






--------------------
You cannot legislate the poor into prosperity by legislating the wealthy out of prosperity. What one person receives without working for another person must work for without receiving. The government cannot give to anybody anything that the government does not first take from somebody else. When half of the people get the idea that they do not have to work because the other half is going to take care of them and when the other half gets the idea that it does no good to work because somebody else is going to get what they work for that my dear friend is the beginning of the end of any nation. You cannot multiply wealth by dividing it. ~ Adrian Rogers


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InvisiblePsiloKitten
Ganja Goddess

Registered: 02/13/99
Posts: 1,617
Re: An Open Letter to the Corporations of America [Re: Xlea321]
    #2056118 - 10/30/03 04:24 AM (13 years, 1 month ago)

Alex,
The guy is a retard. Put him on ignore. I really dont understand how you deal with it.

These people get what they deserve. Im coming to realize that more and more. They are so inconsequential until we give their stupidity voice. Im sick of giving them even the slightest power. That is all they feed off of, your power... your conviction. Never adding, only taking. They have nothing to add.

I went to an Arlo Guthrie concert the other day. It was amazing. He played with an entire symphony. Throughout the concert he told a bunch of stories. One of them was about the people who werent even worth wastin' yer breath on. The theme of the concert was what it is to be a true human American.. I should make an mp3 of it and send it to you.


--------------------


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Invisibleluvdemshrooms
Two inch dick..but it spins!?


Registered: 11/29/01
Posts: 33,808
Loc: Lost In Space
Re: An Open Letter to the Corporations of America [Re: PsiloKitten]
    #2056309 - 10/30/03 05:53 AM (13 years, 1 month ago)

So unless someone agrees with you we're inconsequential?

:lol:


--------------------
You cannot legislate the poor into prosperity by legislating the wealthy out of prosperity. What one person receives without working for another person must work for without receiving. The government cannot give to anybody anything that the government does not first take from somebody else. When half of the people get the idea that they do not have to work because the other half is going to take care of them and when the other half gets the idea that it does no good to work because somebody else is going to get what they work for that my dear friend is the beginning of the end of any nation. You cannot multiply wealth by dividing it. ~ Adrian Rogers


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