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InvisibleViolet
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Registered: 12/07/11
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V-Tek & Easy Casing layers • Growing from watered whole grains in screw-lid plastics * 19
    #19167498 - 11/21/13 05:53 AM (8 years, 10 months ago)

HI! :wave:

Here is a presentation of the seed&plastic tek but more for simplicity as was requested. I may add extra photos over time.
This thread will contain the details of how to set-up, fruit, and water straight-grain cakes for optimal fruiting.


The person who inspired my version of this methodology developed hers growing high up in a populated 'hotel' apartment building, outside the U.S.
Her limitations were availability, weight, fragility, portability, discretion.  Her equipment consisted entirely of still-air boxes, AA910 pressure cookers, can-style tank propane burners, ziplocs and other useful plastics and totes to put them in, small yet powerful single material substrates and small efficient chip LEDs. She focused first on having cultures that could adapt to yielding so highly off of pure grains with the water being fed gradually to the sub instead of colonized in it.  She became able to drain top yields off of grain with way fewer steps and materials and with material/energy use and waste small enough to not draw any attention, even when she boomed her grows up to large scale.

The one concession I can make to the forum's few yet outspoken detractors to this v-tek is that it pays off way way more for people willing to get into the isolation of ideal cultures, although even growing multi-spore this method, in particular the Pods version, is leaps and bounds *easier* than just about any full grow-out method known on the forum, so the payoff doesn't only appear in yield.

And personally I don't see adopting methodologies of superfluous labor and expense as a worthwhile price to pay to avoid culturing, especially since methods that ask for that much of a time/money/labor/learning investment also tend to encourage people to culture anyway...

Here is my "Seed Petri" TEK, an optional yet integral part of this Violet Methodology.  If you want this tek to truly flourish, you absolutely must be on the lookout for the cultures that make the most of its substrates and style.



These screw-top containers are recycling code 5 which holds up perfectly under hi-pressure temperature (as long as the cooker doesn't run out of water)
Requiring no modification, they are sterilized with the lids slightly cracked loose. Do not attempt to sterilize them while sealed!

On the left, a sealed container. Seal them while removing from the sterilizer until and after inoculation.
On the right, a container with the lid very loose but still threaded in to where it does not come off when lifted. This is the loosest it should be for sterilization, but it's more loose than it should be for anything except maybe growing grains invitro.
In the middle, how I suggest keeping lids cracked - for sterilization or when one's project comes to involve a bit of gas exchange.


Any grain substrate from grass seed to corn works but not all are the same. My preference is brown rice followed by grass seed; here is how I prepare those.

Grass seed and brown rice are most ideal for this technique.  Millet (birdseed is mostly millet) works nicely as well, followed by milo (the other common ingredient in birdseed.  Rye, oats, and wheat all work also but possibly to a lesser strength or effect.  Corn can be made to function but is definitely the least ideal grain to use.



Containers are loaded halfway with about one cup (~8oz volume) of prepared grains.

Sterilization times are short and can vary greatly. My AA910 10qt cooker holds 6 containers. On my (powerful) electric stove I sterilize for ~50 min at 15PSI.

The goal is to ensure that the containers on top in the cooker are fully sterilized. The bottom containers nearest the heat source will become sterile before the ones above do. The higher & more that containers are loaded inside a cooker, as well as the more heavily the containers are loaded, the longer time at pressure is required. Also the size of a cooker and type of burner make a difference; larger cookers take a bit more time to saturate with heat, and electric burners only apply heat by conduction from the bottom so the sides of the cooker lose heat instead of being surrounded by the gas burner's runoff heat.

I suggest you start with sterilizing at least 60 minutes, perhaps a few more on electric stoves.


In a still-air/glove box or sterile laminar airflow, inoculate the sterilized containers with a few agar wedges, colonized grains from another container, or liquid inoculant made like this or from shaking sterile water in poms.

I prefer agar wedge for a few containers especially when testing new isolate cultures, and I vastly prefer grain-to-grain inoculation using grass seed for expanding to a full grow of a proven excellent isolate culture.

Time until fully colonized depends on speed of culture and number/spread of inoc points.
This also comes to effect the amount of consolidation time the cakes need.

Grain-to-grain inoculation results in few or many inoculation points depending on the grain. For instance, rye may have 10 grains in a spoonful where grass seed may have 50. This is one of the many reasons I use grass seed – a single container G2Gs 5x as much as rye.  I have known grass seed inoculations to consistently colonize containers in 3-5 days when in proper temperatures.

An agar inoculation with 3 little wedges would have only 3 growth sites but a little shaking trick can help with this and speed up colonization from agar.  After inoculating and sealing the containers are shaken around roughly just like breaking-up & spreading mycelium but even moreso. This rubs mycelium off of the agar wedges amongst the many grains (less or more with different grains; I've seen it the most by far with grass seed). The mycelium will first recover and climb off of the agar wedges since it's already established on the agar's nutrition, but after a few days for the rubbed-off mycelium to dig into local grains it will pop up in many spots and quickly colonize the remaining majority of grains.

Here agar wedge inoculations colonize brown rice:

With grain-to-grain inoc or heavily-shaken agar wedge inoc I almost always see full colonization by a week. Results will vary by inoc and culture.

I've done hundreds of these and full colonization has always been reached without the need for any gas exchange.
Perhaps with an agar wedge inoc of a not-so-speedy or multi-spore culture you could experience stalling before full colonization. If this occurs, only a slight crack of the lid is necessary to allow excess CO2 to be pushed out without compromising the rest of colonization.


CONSOLIDATION
For optimal results!:
Consolidate brown rice for no fewer than 7 days (given the above considerations), then colonize the casing layer within the sealed container before initiating fruiting.
Consolidate grass seed at least a few days to knit together the colonization, then colonize the casing layer within the sealed container before initiating fruiting.


The period of consolidation will vary by a few factors but we can begin the consideration based on 7 days from fully-colonized.
The reason for consolidating is more even pinning in a single simultaneous 'flush' as well as solid potency opportunity.

The explanation:

These cakes are not ready to fruit immediately after full colonization is reached, regardless of grain choice. Some more time is needed for the mycelium to network more densely and consolidate themselves and their substrate into a single solid cake that's thoroughly ready to pin evenly.

When I colonize a grain container quickly, such as with well-spread grass seed inoc or an agar wedge inoc where I rubbed the mycelium all over the grain (both colonize quickly for me, even as soon as 3-4 days for grass seed inoc),  I consider it needing plenty of consolidation time.  This is because I have found that whereas the mycelium was quickly able to spread over the grains it hasn't had very much time to consume it.

When a container is colonized "slowly" (the culture could be fast at doing so), such as gently setting an agar wedge to grow out over all the grains from that point, then I think there is less consolidation time called for.  Much of the mycelium has been on the grains for quite some time, even though the last colonized bit has only recently been colonized, the different type of colonization (thick ropey white) catches up relatively quickly with the rest of the sub.
If the fruiting surface itself has been colonized for quite some time, then there may be little need to consolidate at all to fruit, only for potency if desired.

See here, the colonizing edge of the mycelium is still running, but the inner area of the 'circle' has become beyond ready to fruit for some time:


Temperature is a minor effect also - the cooler, the longer necessary. 66°F may need a day longer than 71°F for the same reason as below...

Another less minor thing that effects this:
Fast cultures.
My culturing tech has given me cultures that colonize ravenously fast, and fruit with a haste as well.
These cultures grow, and thus metabolize of course, more quickly than the others I've found.
I like to think of this this way:  If they colonize in 5 days what another culture might colonize in 7, it's reasonable to suppose that they have done the consolidation work in 5 days that the other might in 7.
I still typically would consolidate for that 7... I just consider the speed of the culture as making those consolidation times more effective for fruiting readiness and solidified potency.


The BIGGEST thing that effects consolidation is your grain choice; some substrates call for consolidation more or less than others.

Mycelium consumes tiny grass seed very quickly.  It needs very little consolidation to become plenty ready to fruit, and in my methods it doesn't even require a casing layer for a couple reasons.
Other larger and more dense grains do require consolidation, not just to fruit optimally or have solidified potency, but perhaps even to fruit at all.  If exposed to conditions early, they might still have to delay until they're ready, like what RR says of unconsolidated PF cakes in "Let's Grow Mushrooms".

I make sure to consolidate my brown rice containers for quite some time, as it certainly needs plenty and benefits from lots,
but grass seed is raring to go by the time its casing layer is fully colonized under the tight lid so I case grass seed just a day or so after colonized and consider the casing colonization as the sub's consolidation as well.


Edited by Violet (12/20/17 06:21 AM)


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InvisibleViolet
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Casing tek • quick, easy, great, efficient casing layers [Re: Violet] * 1
    #19167510 - 11/21/13 05:54 AM (8 years, 10 months ago)

CASING TEK

Casing layers are an excellent tool for hobby mycology when called for.  Reasons to use casing layers are to provide a low-nutrition pinning environment for grows that do not have one, as this has turned out to be a major need for Cubensis, as well as to provide moisture retention for the grains in fruiting chamber environments and an ideal humidity micro-climate for the formation of knots which will become pins.

Always case ANY straight-grain substrate when it will be exposed to a fruiting chamber environment. Any good fruiting chamber has an amount of air and/or air exchange that stops any straight-grain from having an ideal fruiting surface and likely will cause the grain to dry out.
Always case brown rice substrates, even when growing invitro with brown rice.
Grass seed invitro is the only time this tek can (and should) be done without a casing layer.  Grass seed has no problem fruiting nicely uncased in invitro conditions!


I learned this casing layer preparation from Anne Halonium and absolutely love it. It makes for a perfect casing and is a real snap!
Sifted potting soil is ideal by far.
Peat moss with 3-8% garden lime and mixes like "Jiffy Mix" work as well.

Sift sticks and rocks that may be in your material.


Add water past field capacity, carefully bringing the soil to mud. Make it wet enough that a small puddle of dirty water always falls from the mix.

This prep will involve lots of water evaporating from the mix during heat treatment.
Interestingly enough, even with this much water, you're more likely to end up with too dry a material with your first experiments! Water up and have faith!

Load the casing and even the little puddle of dirty water into a microwaveable plastic container.
Place into the microwave with the container's lid loose, partially covering the container, to prevent splatter but allow steam to escape.

Microwave long enough to "boil" for up to 2 minutes, typically 9-11 minutes depending on the microwave and thickness of casing pile.
Leave the microwave off but closed for several minutes then place the lid on the container before removing it.

24-28 hours later repeat the microwave process again.
It's ready to use when cool!

Crumble the casing evenly onto the freshly-opened cakes with clean hands. It's fluffy and very moist in a perfect way. In particular, gently push casing up against the sides of the container!

(Any 'sand' condensed at the bottom is discarded)

Mycelium will almost always colonize the casing layer a bit before pinning so they can be set in the fruiting chamber to do this or you can have them spend part of this casing colonization time under a loosely cracked lid.


If you ensured that casing is against the sides of the container, they almost certainly will pin on top even if the genetics are so picky towards forming in the 100%RH microclimates sidepins prefer.


Edited by Violet (01/27/15 08:22 AM)


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InvisibleViolet
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Fruiting grain cakes in containers [Re: Violet] * 2
    #19167513 - 11/21/13 05:54 AM (8 years, 10 months ago)

FRUITING

They can fruit in practically any chamber. Shotgun terrariums, hi-humidity "greenhouses" or tents, old monotubs or unmodified totes work great and involve their own subtleties to work with this technique. I've even seen some other solutions used such as fishtanks, large water bottles, plastic storage baggies...


As a suggestion for beginners, those wanting to only fruit a number of containers, or for that odd container out of the chamber or that's ready at a time all by itelf, it's very easy to fruit these containers individually with something like soda bottles!
I cut them at the widest point near the bottom where they'll just barely go over the edge of the container and sit over the threads.

Here's one uncased container giving its 1st and 2nd flushes:





The fruiting condition is steadily high humidity (~90-100% RH, 99-100%RH uncased) and adequate air exchange.

These two factors effect each other but such small cakes tend to favor conditions of controlled air exchange in favor of retained moisture.


Adequate air exchange is typically the problem for mycology grows, but since these substrates are small it is much easier to reach. Watering the cakes instead of re-colonizing additional substrate means that there is not 2-10x the breathing mycelium due to colonized watermass.

The air requirement of a container will vary by how rich the air is with O2 and how heavy with CO2. Different buildings and places build up CO2 differently, varying with inhabitants. Also different genetics will respond more or less healthily with CO2 buildup.

As a referential minimum, if the local air is exchanged well a container may only require 2 air exchanges per day with 12-18 inches of overhead air (considering using a tote, which is also not air-tight).  Experiment and observe the behavior of your fruits to see if they are receiving enough air. Yields can be reduced if oxygen is the weakest link in the metabolic supply.


Moisture is by far the greater focus and concern but is very easy to handle.
Casing layers provide ideal pinning microclimates and cause substrates to retain moisture very well (whereas grains otherwise easily lose their moisture to evaporation, requiring 100% humidity uncased).
Bottom-watering allows the cake to draw up water, keeping a flow of evaporation from the substrate that keeps the fruiting surface at 100% even in 85-96%RH conditions, and helping keep the chamber's humidity up.
Misting moisture droplets on the sides and bottom of the chamber, not only on the casing layers (but in fact less on the casing layers), provides a great surface area of moisture evaporation all over the chamber. Casing layers combined with this is enough for size-to-fit chambers where the cakes have 12-18" overhead air.


Learning how little often it is required to exchange air in chambers of these cakes not only can minimize effort and energy but moisture loss from the terrarium, particularly the cakes, keeping the conditions ideal for the formation of sensitive tiny pins!
As the fruits are growing large, fresh air exchanges can be increased (more mycelium, more CO2) and misting a bit less gentle. This is why there is sometimes a difference referred to in "pinning" and "cropping" conditions.


The "sweet spot" of overlapping retained humidity and adequate air exchange is extremely small with exposed straight grains.  I suggest exposed grain growing Only for invitro, and I've even come to love casing for invitro fruiting!

Said "sweet spot" is Much wider when implementing a casing layer, and gives the mycelium a low-nutrition fruiting surface to appease their apparent desire to fruit away from their nutrition source.


With practice, some ideal culturing, and mid-flush watering,  it's not difficult to reach results like these...



Edited by Violet (12/20/17 06:33 AM)


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InvisibleViolet
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Bottom-watering [Re: Violet] * 2
    #19167516 - 11/21/13 05:55 AM (8 years, 10 months ago)

Mushrooms are 90% water and substrates lose notable amounts of moisture, so practically speaking you will not yield more mushrooms than you provide water for.  The main difference in grow techniques is how one chooses to provide that water.


It's possible to roughly determine energy expenditure by how much water is sterilized or pasteurized, and for how long.
Water has the highest specific heat so heat-treating more water leads to greatly increased energy cost.  Heat-treating glass and/or large material masses also increases this expenditure without increasing output whatsoever.

With bulk substrate techniques, about 3/4 of one's yield comes in the first flush so at least 3/4 of the water used for mushrooms is heat-treated; all of it if only 1 big flush is taken.
With this grow technique, just about 1/3 of one's yield comes in the first flush so much less of the water had to be heat-treated.

Those combined factors along with a few others make this grow tek the most efficient way to grow I have seen, by a wide margin.
My projects used to leave a noteworthy mark on my electric payments; not anymore.



BOTTOM-WATERING is a solution to balance the water-to-nutrition ratio (can be thought of conceptually as the likes of 1:10 respectively) by gradually feeding water to the grain cake as they draw moisture up into mushrooms.

Fully-colonized substrates can be hydrated with tap water, and mycelium easily move water across substrates to growing mushrooms, so there is no need for any extra steps to provide our grows with the amount of water they require for optimum yield (and no water goes wasted).


It is truly as simple as it sounds.
Once the cake has shrunk enough due to the first flush to pull away from the sides of the container, add water to come up to at least half way up the side of the cake depending on its height.  If there is very little space on the sides, a small amount of water may come almost up to the casing level, which is okay.

The most important time to water is when pins are starting to grow.

You will see it gradually disappear into the cake and ultimately into mushrooms.


If a cake has not drawn up lingering water by 3-4 days after a flush is harvested I often remove that water until the next round of pins is growing since this is usually a sign that the cake has enough water for now and they will not use more until it is being moved to larger forming fruits.


Why does bottom-watering work, and so well?
Colonized sub can hold more water than uncolonized sub material; once it's colonized it can soak it up like a sponge and be just fine. Thus all water does not have to be present in the substrate at colonization.
Dunks are obviously not a sterile procedure. Immediately after "birthing" PF cakes they go straight to a dunk!, because fully-colonized sub is extremely resistant to contamination. Once grains are fully colonized & consolidated you can definitely use non-sterile water without risk.

Therefore, and since mycelium can absorb and migrate moisture:  All water does not have to be present in the substrate for fruiting, either.

Since these cakes are small they have plenty of area to take-in moisture and nowhere that is too far from that moisture as to become anhydrous.


Here are six excellent containers of multi-spore AA+ by Anne:




The cakes can and will flush, flush, flush, & flush again!
They will not stop until contaminating or until they have had enough water to expend their nutrition fruiting.

Just a few photos to give an idea. Will add some more as I can take them.
Some of my first flushes with multi-spore...


3rd flushes from some ok clones...


4th/5th flushes, perhaps even beyond!


Cakes become smushy soggy piles of spent mycelium a fraction of their original size in 4-7 flushes.
Let them keep going and keep the water coming!


Edited by Violet (03/18/15 08:18 AM)


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InvisibleViolet
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Biological efficiency & Yield [Re: Violet]
    #19167522 - 11/21/13 05:56 AM (8 years, 10 months ago)

That sums up the Tek itself!

This last part will be to descriptively and mathematically outline the possibilities of this style grow and just a couple of the many reasons I choose it over others.
For explanations of other reasons which are not based on biological efficiency numbers, such as energy expenditure, see the original presentation here.


There are a few who evidently think for some reason that the use of bulk substrates somehow increases the yield potential of grains, and thus that my straight-grain grows cannot possibly yield as much as those grains would in bulk substrates.

To a certain extent I would agree that a person who doesn't know the simplicity of conditions that straight-grains require will see a limited output from grains alone.  There's no doubt when under the same conditions that "bulk" growers use that a certain amount of grain mixed in with wet mass will yield more than the poor half-dry unwatered straight grains.
If mishandled or even not well handled it's quite possible that learners will have no better results from a half-pint grain cake than they would a half-pint PF cake with a third of the grain ingredient.

However I utterly refute the unsupportable idea that a failure to achieve full yield from grains somehow means that the grains do not have available their full potential when handled and watered properly.
How could that possibly change that I get my results?

When given everything they need as any good grower should intend and learn to do,
there's no logical reason that grains will have more nutritive potential in one method than another.


Biological Efficiency (BE) & Yield

Clearly not all substrates are equal. "Bulk" substrates (coir, manure, vermiculite, etc.) can be pasteurized as treatment but grains must be sterilized due to their much greater nutritional value.
Amongst the two main categories of "grains" or "bulks" there are differences as well. Manure can be somewhat nutritious whereas vermiculite has effectively near nothing of value.  Coir can be hydrated and heat-treated for use simultaneously with "bucket tek" but a more nutritious sub like manure is unlikely to have success with the same approach.
Any difference in grains (as far as mycelium are concerned) has been a bit harder to quantify since most seldom grow with grains alone much less with controlled variables, but I assert that those differences are much more clear in a technique such as mine and I have seen the spectrum of differences widen dramatically.
If someone tells you there are not real and effective differences amongst substrates for a given species/culture, question what low-resolution perception of the matter they have taken which makes them truly believe such a nonsensical thing.

Grains are the heart of all our grows. They carry the yield. Other "bulk" substrates reduce biological efficiency as a means of applying the hydration necessary for yield.


Biological efficiency of a yield is calculated by the fresh weight harvest over dry substrate weight used.

100 grams fresh yield
100 grams dry substrate        = 100% BE

(Since mushrooms are typically ±90% water, we can figure BE with dry harvest weights by multiplying the harvest or the BE by 10)

2lbs/907g of grain (rice in my case) makes 12-13 cups, 3+ quarts, 5-6 quart jars the way we load them for our use.  (Grass seed makes more)
Say we colonize those with an isolate culture and 'spawn' them to a brick's worth of coir in a monotub, yielding a nice 2724 grams wet (9.6oz dry).
Calculating BE of grains only, we get 300% BE.  However including the 1.5lb/680g coir brick we get 172% (verm would lower it even further).
Now, if we calculate BE based on only the coir, we get 400%.

So the question is:  Which is more believable? 400% BE from low-nutrient coir :lmafo: or 300% from high-nutrient grain? :levitate:

Of course neither is solely responsible for the yield occurring. ~3000mL prepped grains do not contain over 3000mL of water, nowhere close. The bulk substrate provides the lion's share of the required moisture while the grains carry the majority of nutrition.

Bulk substrate techniques seemed to be an improvement on straight-grain grows because it allowed more yield to come of the same grains, since no adequate way of providing adequate moisture to straight grains was discovered/devised.  Bulk sub thus improved yield, but not yield potential.
So providing water to grains became a mycological procedure with heat-treating additional substrates and a new colonization stage, instead of just a watering procedure!  Imagine if we thus tricked ourselves into thinking we had to transfer plants to new wet soil every time they needed more water!


Bottom-watering small subs makes it possible to provide that grain nutrition with water over time – without additional substrate, energy, clean work, or colonization, without requiring a specific type fruiting chamber with tons of air exchange and moisture loss, and without losing an entire project due to a single contamination.


This allows us to use our BE-per-grain-only calculations for supposing at potential yields with this grow technique.

Since 907g of dry rice expands to 12-13 cups prepared sub and my containers are loaded with 1 cup, that means my fruiting containers use 70-75 grams of brown rice.

75g brown rice  X  300% BE  =  225 wet grams  =  ~22 dry grams.  Per container.


This is not just a theoretical supposition. The above yield-per-container figure does indeed match my experience with the tek when using good isolates, particularly those taken with [url=Biological efficiency of a yield is calculated by the fresh weight harvest over dry substrate weight used.  100 grams fresh yield 100 grams dry substrate        = 100% BE  (Since mushrooms are typically ±90% water, we can figure BE with dry harvest weights by multiplying the harvest or the BE by 10)]my culturing method[/url].


I feel that using straight undiluted grain with bottom-watering makes reaching top efficiency more possible to the practiced grower with than with a "bulk" hydration technique, for the following known reasons combined that otherwise reduce "bulk" BE capability:
  • The colony is not destroyed in the break-up prior to "spawning".
  • The mycelium does not use the grain's nutrition to fuel hyper-expansion (2 - 10 times the mycelium) over low-nutrient sub (0 - 1/4th the value).
  • Mycelium itself has very noteworthy nutritional needs. From the beginning of colonization until fruiting is finished, nutrition is used to sustain the mycelium colony. 10-30% of the mycelium total means 10-30% of the nutrition used for that.
  • Not any handling, much less any mishandling. Although mycelium obviously survives "births" and/or "dunks" & carries on fruiting, bottom-watering totally avoids shocking resets and the harsh flattening of surface mycelium. It continues its life-cycle at its own pace without any "recovery" intervals necessary.
  • Great success rate. This was very important to me! I have far fewer losses since my success relies only on my easy & excellent sterile tech, not turning that sterile tech to the wind while crossing my fingers hoping the best for all my eggs in one basket, uncolonized substrate in unsterile environs. A single loss to contamination is a tiny loss instead of the whole project.  These grain cakes expend much more slowly and stay healthy far longer as well, meaning that I typically toss cakes from expenditure before contams set in!


"Bulk" substrate techniques accept the above disadvantages, so that they are at lesser risk of drying despite usually being the source of fruiting chamber humidity (noob defense), and so that mycelium will have (in advance) enough moisture to flush-out most of their nutrition in a single flush... And yet still depending on the nutrition-to-water ratio ("spawn" ratio) more water may nonetheless be required to finish fruiting from remaining nutrition in later flushes.

_____________________________________________________________


When I finished switching to this technique instead of using bulk substrates, Big parts of my process went entirely unused; the biggest sub, the biggest water, the biggest energy, the biggest clean work, the biggest failure risk juncture, the biggest garbage, and the biggest monetary expense. Yet my big output stayed consistent and a step-up in quality has been clear.  I cannot imagine a grower with eyes-open somehow missing this happen right in front of them.  Give it a good try!

Thanks for reading!


Edited by Violet (01/23/15 06:55 PM)


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OfflinecronicrMFacebook
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Re: Biological efficiency & Yield [Re: Violet]
    #19167534 - 11/21/13 05:59 AM (8 years, 10 months ago)

:girlofdisapproval: kidding...only kidding lol


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It doesn't matter what i think of you...all that matters is clean spawn

I'm tired do me a favor


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OfflineMush4Brains
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Re: Biological efficiency & Yield [Re: cronicr]
    #19167626 - 11/21/13 06:19 AM (8 years, 10 months ago)

Quote:

cronicr said:
:girlofdisapproval: kidding...only kidding lol




I'm not.


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Re: Biological efficiency & Yield [Re: Mush4Brains] * 1
    #19167634 - 11/21/13 06:20 AM (8 years, 10 months ago)

then y you here?
v thats a fuck ton of work u put in their and nce pics:headbang3:


--------------------

It doesn't matter what i think of you...all that matters is clean spawn

I'm tired do me a favor


Edited by cronicr (11/21/13 06:21 AM)


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Re: "Violet tek" & Easy Casing layers • Growing from watered whole grains in screw-lid plastics [Re: cronicr]
    #19167655 - 11/21/13 06:26 AM (8 years, 10 months ago)

Thanks chron!
I intend to add some even nicer pics next round of something to photo.
Culture tech thread was a way bigger thing for me, I'm super proud of that. It's the core of the grow.


--------------------
Intentionally or not, here in mushcult we are purveyors of love culture and enlightenment movement. Let's try to act like it!

PODS TEK - Growing Invitro with BRF/verm or Grass Seed containers
The simplest, quickest, safest tek!  For beginners, culturers, lazy people, stealth lovers, contam haters, and alternative seekers!
Violet's Teks and Posts


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Re: Biological efficiency & Yield [Re: cronicr]
    #19167695 - 11/21/13 06:35 AM (8 years, 10 months ago)

Very nice tek thanks for some new info I will be using the next few days for casing my two monotubs of PE!


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"You tell him, and I will smack you. I will smack you like a bad, bad donkey!"


Our dreams are a second life. I have never been able to penetrate without a shudder those ivory or horned gates which separate us from the invisible world.


"In order to use your head, you have to go out of your mind" -  Tim Leary


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OfflineBigGreenMat
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Re: Biological efficiency & Yield [Re: DannyDGAF]
    #19167863 - 11/21/13 07:16 AM (8 years, 10 months ago)

Thanks violet subbed.


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InvisiblePastywhyteMDiscord
Say hello to my little friend
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Re: Biological efficiency & Yield [Re: BigGreenMat]
    #19167950 - 11/21/13 07:41 AM (8 years, 10 months ago)

I don't think that this is the way I would grow cubes myself, but a great write up nonetheless. My PP5 Mex A is getting some good stones in it and I am planning on doing the whole bottom watering, though I'm not sure about the whole microwaved casing, maybe when I do the full tek complete with RGS. Would this work for pans? I am planning a lot of experiments with them soon, and I did find that PP5 worked better than glass for pan spawn regardless.

Anyway an attractive and well written write up all around :thumbup: Just don't mention anne's name too loudly :lol:


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OfflineJMcDoogle
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Re: Biological efficiency & Yield [Re: Pastywhyte]
    #19167962 - 11/21/13 07:44 AM (8 years, 10 months ago)

C'mon, I told you.. Name it V-TEK.

Ricer's ... get it.. get it.. Ricers?
Grain?

V-Tek??

Nvm....
:unwanted:


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The ego is nothing other than the focus of conscious attention.


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Offlinefractaldill
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Re: Biological efficiency & Yield [Re: JMcDoogle]
    #19171464 - 11/22/13 02:47 AM (8 years, 10 months ago)

i love it


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InvisibleViolet
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Re: Biological efficiency & Yield [Re: JMcDoogle]
    #19171949 - 11/22/13 04:20 AM (8 years, 10 months ago)

Quote:

JMcDoogle said:
C'mon, I told you.. Name it V-TEK.
Ricer's ... get it.. get it.. Ricers?
Grain?
V-Tek??



Ya I definitely get it, and it's hilarious
Very meta.



I really still hope we can come up with a fitting name. "Container tek" doesn't quite seem right, but it's the best I've thought of so far


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Intentionally or not, here in mushcult we are purveyors of love culture and enlightenment movement. Let's try to act like it!

PODS TEK - Growing Invitro with BRF/verm or Grass Seed containers
The simplest, quickest, safest tek!  For beginners, culturers, lazy people, stealth lovers, contam haters, and alternative seekers!
Violet's Teks and Posts


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InvisibleSmeagol
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Re: Biological efficiency & Yield [Re: Violet]
    #19172075 - 11/22/13 04:43 AM (8 years, 10 months ago)

I'm not following your tek but I do have a container of wbs fruiting. Inspired by your grass seed and other things. I had popped it out and put in a crappy sgfc. Humidity issue had me misting a couple times a day for about 2 days. I put it back into the square ziplok and into a trash can mini mono. First flush is done. It has never truly fit back in. its actually suspended above the bottom of the container because its to "wide". I don't really have any questions just wandering what you thought.

Another good right up. Ill have to look through your threads again and get more details. Got a spawned cotainer of bulk sub to fruit but Ill be trying your grass seed method once I get the details of your fruiting chamber down and compare it to my low needs and low RH.


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Muh grow

The road to hell is paved with good intentions, but it is not paved with clarity.” -Terence

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OfflineSgt. Pepper
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Re: Biological efficiency & Yield [Re: Smeagol]
    #19172384 - 11/22/13 05:03 AM (8 years, 10 months ago)

You really can't argue with results, but I was always told that grains with no other nutrient substrates produce tiny fruits? Again, you can't deny that this tek works and the pictures prove it, I'm not putting down the tek at all, I'm just confused.


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OfflineBigGreenMat
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Re: Biological efficiency & Yield *DELETED* [Re: Sgt. Pepper]
    #19172446 - 11/22/13 05:14 AM (8 years, 10 months ago)

Post deleted by BigGreenMat

Reason for deletion: Wrong reply to person



Edited by BigGreenMat (11/22/13 05:22 AM)


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OfflineSgt. Pepper
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Re: Biological efficiency & Yield [Re: BigGreenMat]
    #19172464 - 11/22/13 05:17 AM (8 years, 10 months ago)

Quote:

BigGreenMat said:
I know you are a big fan of Ryegrass seed and Brown Rice, but have you tried this tek with Wild Bird Seed?  I only ask because the prices on Wild Bird Seed are ridiculously low (as low as $.35 per pound).  Meanwhile the best I could do for Ryegrass would be around $1 a pound and a bit more than that for Brown Rice.



I have never done this tek so I can't say for sure, but grains are usually pretty interchangeable in other teks. Ones they're all colonized it's just some grain held together with mycelium anyways.


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OfflineJMcDoogle
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Re: Biological efficiency & Yield [Re: Violet]
    #19172530 - 11/22/13 05:28 AM (8 years, 10 months ago)

Quote:

Violet said:
Quote:

JMcDoogle said:
C'mon, I told you.. Name it V-TEK.
Ricer's ... get it.. get it.. Ricers?
Grain?
V-Tek??



Ya I definitely get it, and it's hilarious
Very meta.



I really still hope we can come up with a fitting name. "Container tek" doesn't quite seem right, but it's the best I've thought of so far




*Chants*

V-TEK,V-TEK,V-TEK ...

WHAT DO YOU WANT

V-TEK!

HOW YA GANNA DO IT?

V-TEK!

WHOS THE BEST?

V-TEK!

WANT SOME KOOL-AID?

V-TEK!


--------------------
The ego is nothing other than the focus of conscious attention.


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