Home | Community | Message Board


Kratom Eye
Please support our sponsors.

General Interest >> Political Discussion

Welcome to the Shroomery Message Board! You are experiencing a small sample of what the site has to offer. Please login or register to post messages and view our exclusive members-only content. You'll gain access to additional forums, file attachments, board customizations, encrypted private messages, and much more!

Jump to first unread post. Pages: 1
OfflinePedM
Interested In Your Brain
 User Gallery

Folding@home Statistics
Registered: 08/31/99
Posts: 5,494
Loc: Canada
Last seen: 16 days, 15 hours
A view of American Foreign Policy
    #1893999 - 09/08/03 01:54 PM (13 years, 2 months ago)

I thought some of you Politics posters might find this snippy article either amusing, or annoying. Take it was you will.



Behind Enemy Lines

A view of American Foreign Policy from a Canadian living in California

From FastForward Magazine FFWD49 Sept 04 - Sept 10, 2003. Calgary, Alberta.



Scattered around El Segundo are mysterious buildings with black windows, security cameras, imposing fences and no logos. These buildings are more ominous than the ones occupied by the big defence contractors -- at least the contracts put up big neon signs, so you know what they're up to.

There's Boeing just a rock's throw away, proud manufacturer of JDAMs. That's Joint Direct Attack Munitions -- smart bombs, if you don't know. The ones that aren't awalsy smart and have killed hundreds of civilians in Afghanistan and Iraq. They also make the F/A 18E/F Super Hornet and the F-15 Eagle, which are very expensive fighter jets. Some of these are bought by Israel so they can keep the Palestinians from claiming land that every country on the planet believes they have a right to. Well, except the U.S. and Israel. Lockheed Martin is just around the corner, as is Northrop Grumman, proud pap of the B2 Stealth Bomber.

Raytheon and Boeing share a beautiful grass field across the street where their employees play flag football, softball and soccer. They won't let anyone else use it. Bastards. It was one of Raytheon's bombs that killed 62 civilians in a market in Baghdad. You just never know what evil lurks behind a fruit and vegetable stand.

It's not about killing in El Segundo. The Los Angeles Kings have their training camp facility here. Sometimes I go over and skate during my lunch hour. But you can't skate with a stick, they're worried someone might get hurt.

It's tough being anti-war in the United States, but it's especially tough in El Segundo. I once ducked into a diner for a tuna sandwhich. It took me a while to realize that they had looped "Proud to Be an American." It played and played and played. The waiter was singing along and the patrons were swaying back and forth. I didn't bother to finish my freedom fries.

After I left the diner, I tried to remember a quote by Leo Tolstoy. I went back to my office and looked it up: "Patriotism is an immoral feeling because, instead of confessing himself a son of God.. or even a free man guided by his own reason, each man under the influence of patriotism confesses himself the son of his fatherland and the slave of his government, and comits actions contrary to his reason and conscience." Like singing along to "Proud to Be an American," swaying on a diner stool, firing rockets into crowded markets or dropping cluster bombs on children.

We have a high-tech, flat screen television in the lobby at my work. A clutch of colleagues had gathered to listen to an old retired general on CNN remind everyone about Saddam Hussein gassing his own people. One of my co-workers became quite aggitated and could no longer contain himself. "We gotta get that guy!" he shouted.

Most Americans aren't stupid -- they just have short memories, in no small part because of CNN, Fox, NBC, CBS and ABC help to keep them uninformed and easily manipulated. I think Henry Ford once said, "History is bunk." Iwanted to remind "the agitated one" that Saddam indeed killed thousands of Kurds with gas. But he did so while being supported by the United States. And when then secretary of state George Shultz was asked about it, he didn't yell, "We gotta get that guy!", He said, "No comment."

I try to keep my mouth shut at work, but there are times when it's impossible. Like the time someone from the art studio told me "we had to go in" because Saddam had weapons of mass destruction and couldn't be trusted. "And you can?" I blurted in a crowded kitchen. "You're the only country that's dropped nuclear bombs on human beings. Three hundred thousand people died, mostly old men, women and children." All was silent except for the sound of someone grinding an espresso. I retreated back to my cube knowing that I was "them" -- not just because I was Canadian, but also because they now knew that I opposed the war, an opinion I had previously kept to myself.

Once I had "outed" myself, I decided to take action. I turned in my cable converter box, a desperate act of self-preservation to keep me from watching Fox, a station that caused me fits of rage. Then I hit the streets and marches in peace demonstrations. Guys drove by and gave me the finger (it was just like high school). Made brave by the demonstrators on either side, I waved my sign with my skinny arm and flashed my peace sign.

We marched on CNN, we sang songs at the Oscars and we marched downtown to the deferal building. The downtown march was fun because I dressed up in a red monk's robe and wore a skeleton mask. I had previously worm my Canadian flag as a cape, but decided the skeleton mask seemed more provocative.

I felt tremendous kinship with my fellow protesters, but I experiences an increasing sense of isolation and doom at home. No cable box. No hockey playoffs. Still, I perservered. I wore a tiny peace pin, which annoyed an elevator passenger to much he called me a traitor. Once he found out I was Canadian, he just called me an asshole. Thank goodness -- I hear they hang traitors in America.

Sometimes I wear my Parks Canada T-shirt, which has a beaver on it. Occasionally I get asked about it -- not why Canada has a beaver for a national symbol, but why Canada didn't send any troops to Iraq. I tell them it's pretty simple: they United Nations did not approve it, and that means it's an illegal invasion (and now occupation) of a sovereign state. My country refused, and I am proud of that fact.

There's an Englishman at work who seems awfully proud that Tony Blair is George Bush's bitch. He sends me these annoying e-mails making fun of France and French people. All over a single veto. I was quite disappointed my fellow landed immigrant hadn't bothered to check the historical facts. France has only used it's veto privilege 18 times, 13 of those were in co-operation with the U.S. The U.S., on the othe rhand, has used its veto 76 times, 35 of which blocked resolutions criticizing Israel.

I scratched my head for the longest time wondering why Blair would allow himself to be at the end of Bush's leash. Bush is a beefheaded vigilante hunting evil-doers. Blair is an articulate statesman from a left-wing party. What could these two men possibly have in comon? Then I saw Blair interviewed by the BBC. The interviewer pressed hard for an answer on Blair's religious beliefs. And Blair, clearly uncomfortable, finally admitted he was a believer in and follower of Jesus Christ. The parnership suddenly made sense.

I'm not suggesting, given the factthat Bush and Blair have handed their lives over to Jesus, that this was a religious war, although I don't mind if the thought crosses your mind. This war was connected to 9-11. And then it wasn't. It was a war to rid Iraq of weapons of mass destruction. Don't you remember the smoking gun? The documents that proved Saddam Hussein was trying to buy significant quantities of uranium from Niger? Oh, but those turned out to be forgeries. Remember Colin Powell at the Security Council? He had those indisputable intelligence satellite pictures? So where are these weapons? Oh wait, Bush has just sent a thousand or so "arms inspectors" over and I'll bet dollars to doughnuts that they will find something, even they have to pack it over themselves.

Once the Americans became concerned that maybe UN Inspector Hans Blix had started to do a decent job of searching for weapons (destroying their invasion rationalization), it became a war about regime change. "We gotta get that guy." And on April 16, the U.S. ambassador to Canada, Paul Cellucci, said it was done to protect the United States. From what? Iraq didn't have a navy. Or an air force. They had soldiers trundling around in the backs of pickup trucks trying to stop $45 million Abrams tanks, which cost as much as Jagr, Tkachuk, Lidstrom and Kariya made this year. That's an expensive tank.

The United States wants contorl over the oil resources in the Persian Gulf. If they control the oil then they eventually have control over Europe, Russia and China, which will need two -thirds of it's oil from the Gulf, according to a study by the CIA's National Intelligence Council. Why do you think the U.S is propping up Ahmad Chalabi as the new ruler of Iraq? Chalabi, a wealthy aristocrat who fled Iraq in 1958, didn't spend his time in Washington meeting with the Red Cross. He was meeting with U.S. oil companies. If you think this war was about anything else, you've been swaying on your stool far too long.

I recently had my green card renewed. Isat and waited while a Mexican labourer drilled screws into a Homeland Security banner on the wall. I was the only Cauacasian in the room. most of the other immigrants wore U.S.-flag T-Shirts, buttons, etc. They looked so nervous and frightened.

I was eligible to apply for citizenship, but I couldn't put my hand on my heart and swear alleiance to the American flag, something my Canadian friends have done (with their fingers crossed behind their backs). Why do I stay if I dislike it so much? Well, I'm a masochist. Besides, there's work to be done down here. Important work. And I like to stay angry. It helps me avoid looking at my personal life, which is a disaster.

Just once I'd like the United States to pick on somebody their own size. Imean they've kicked the shit out of Guatemala, Indonesia, Cuba, Peru, Laos, Cambodia, Grenada, Lebanon, Libya, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Panama, Sudan, Afghanistan, and Iraq twice now. Why not take on China? Or Russia and Europe and China (before they lose their access to oil)? For goodness sake, fair is fair. It's like Tie Domi going after Valeri Bure, night after night.

Oh, by the way, President Mugabe took advantage of the Iraq invasion to round up opposition supports so they could be tortured and killed. Why isn't Bush talking about a regime change in Zimbabwe? Iraq has oil. Zimbabwe has cabbage and lettuce.

I hate polls, except when they prove a point I want to make. Over 50 percent of Americans believed (before the war) that Saddam was behind the attacks of September 11. And at the same time, a majority of Americans said they wanted to lose weight. That's scary because not a scrap of evidence has ever been produced for either claim. Before hostilities commenced, 70 percent of Americans opposed going to war without a UN resolution. Once the first American died in combat, the number stayed the same, but it was 70 per cent in favour of the war. That's all you have to do if you're president -- commit ground troops, give briefings to the compliant media and the numbers magically invert.

The revelation that the corporate-sponsored American government was the enemy of the free world did not happen overnight. It built slowly (as some epiphanies do). It started with the collapse of the Soviet Union. I recall an uneasy feeling, thinking "Well, if the Soviet Union is gone, then who or what is going to keep the United States in check?"

Then Bush was handed the reigns of the most powerful country on Earth by a panel of judges, which wasn't very democratic of them. And Bush shouted "Giddyup." He withdrew frmo the Kyoto Protocol on global warming. He pulled out of the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty. He sabotaged arms-control initiatives. He turned the nuclear war strategy upside down when he announced that non-nuclear states could be targeted. He renounced the signing of the Rome protocol that created the International Criminal Court. He told the world there are rules for you and rules for us.

Americans love freedom and liberty -- all you have to do is say the magic words and their eyes glaze over. That's why Bush uses those words over and over, usually in speeches to soldiers and children. The April 21 cover of U.S News & World Report showed liberated Iraqi men kissing a U.S. marine, who smiles ecstatically while holding a red flower aloft. It's the perfect picture of freedom and liberty. It's a lie. American soldiers stood aside as the National Library and the National Museum in Baghdad were destroyed, along with Iraq's cultural heritage. History is bunk, remember? Oh, the marines did stand guard outside the Ministry of Oil -- it wasn't damaged.

It seems the proud proponent of freedom and liberty has revealed itself as a false prophet, a bully that uses $45 million tanks, bribery and extortion to further it's hegemonic grip on the world.

The United States government is an enemy of sovereignty, law and order (international, that is), diplomacy, human rights, the environment, fairness, compassion, and human dignity.

A woman I work with was all in a twister after John Walker Lindh was captured. She called him a traitor. She said he should be hung. "Hung?" I asked. "Is that really fair? A man rapes a woman and gets seven years. Is betrayal of America that great a sin? I think turning your back on the suffering of the world is a much greater sin." A wek later she came to me and said she had thought about it and had decided that the planet was more important than the self-interest of the United States. This woman had slightly loosened herself from the nationalistic grip of America.

So talk to Americans. They aren't stupid. Ask them to be a touch more sensitive to the plight of other people around the world. And don't hate them. They're not all the same. How did they nkow when they voted in 2000 that they were electing the King of the World? Now they know. Or they must be remuinded. And they must be helped. Because it's not easy electing the king of the world. There's so much to think about. And if Americans are anything like Canadians, all they want to know is what their leader is going to do about education, crime, healthcare, tax relief. But Americans have to, for the first time in their history, look beyond their borders and find -- I don't know -- compassion, for starters. And they need to know that it's OK to be a citizen of the world first and an American second. Actually, it's not just OK, it's essential if we are to survive as a species.


--------------------


:poison: Dark Triangles - New Psychedelic Techno Single - Listen on Soundcloud :poison:
Gyroscope full album available SoundCloud or MySpace


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Invisibleafoaf
CEO DBK?
 User Gallery

Registered: 11/08/02
Posts: 32,665
Loc: Ripple's Heart
Re: A view of American Foreign Policy [Re: Ped]
    #1894742 - 09/08/03 04:51 PM (13 years, 2 months ago)

France has only used it's veto privilege 18 times, 13 of those were in co-operation with the U.S. The U.S., on the othe rhand, has used its veto 76 times, 35 of which blocked resolutions criticizing Israel.




--------------------
All I know is The Growery is a place where losers who get banned here go.


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Offlineshakta
Infidel
Registered: 06/03/03
Posts: 2,633
Last seen: 12 years, 6 months
Re: A view of American Foreign Policy [Re: afoaf]
    #1894811 - 09/08/03 05:03 PM (13 years, 2 months ago)

What is your point?


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
OfflineWhiteRabbitt
Stranger
 User Gallery

Registered: 06/06/02
Posts: 3,486
Last seen: 8 years, 7 months
Re: A view of American Foreign Policy [Re: Ped]
    #1894836 - 09/08/03 05:10 PM (13 years, 2 months ago)

The part about them watching CNN at work and that guy getting all pissed off reminds me alot of 1984's 2 minute hate.


--------------------
You gotta jump and swing up to hit me in the knees.



Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Invisibleafoaf
CEO DBK?
 User Gallery

Registered: 11/08/02
Posts: 32,665
Loc: Ripple's Heart
Re: A view of American Foreign Policy [Re: shakta]
    #1895293 - 09/08/03 07:14 PM (13 years, 2 months ago)

quit looking for an argument.

it was probably the only interesting thing in
the entire essay.


--------------------
All I know is The Growery is a place where losers who get banned here go.


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
OfflinegeokillsA
∙∙∙∙☼ º¿° ☼∙∙∙∙
Male User Gallery

Registered: 05/08/01
Posts: 19,096
Loc: city of angels Flag
Last seen: 9 hours, 24 minutes
Re: A view of American Foreign Policy [Re: afoaf]
    #1895903 - 09/08/03 10:47 PM (13 years, 2 months ago)

I disagree, the article was enjoyable. My favorite excerpt:

"And don't hate them. They're not all the same."


--------------------

--------------------
··∙   long live the shroomery  ∙··
...π╥ ╥π...


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Offlinereal_corona
Real Corona

Registered: 08/24/03
Posts: 20
Loc: Alaska
Last seen: 12 years, 11 months
Re: A view of American Foreign Policy [Re: geokills]
    #1895959 - 09/08/03 11:07 PM (13 years, 2 months ago)

Of course the US wants to protect Isreal, so far they are the only country we haven't fucked over yet in the world.


--------------------
That explains why you're looking at me like I just took a giant dump on your front lawn.


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Offlineshakta
Infidel
Registered: 06/03/03
Posts: 2,633
Last seen: 12 years, 6 months
Re: A view of American Foreign Policy [Re: afoaf]
    #1897571 - 09/09/03 11:04 AM (13 years, 2 months ago)

Quote:

afoaf said:
quit looking for an argument.

it was probably the only interesting thing in
the entire essay. 




OK, I thought that was why we were all here. :wink:


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Invisibleafoaf
CEO DBK?
 User Gallery

Registered: 11/08/02
Posts: 32,665
Loc: Ripple's Heart
Re: A view of American Foreign Policy [Re: shakta]
    #1899478 - 09/09/03 08:11 PM (13 years, 2 months ago)

:smirk:


--------------------
All I know is The Growery is a place where losers who get banned here go.


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Jump to top. Pages: 1

General Interest >> Political Discussion

Similar ThreadsPosterViewsRepliesLast post
* Rethinking American foreign policy and Iraq
( 1 2 3 4 all )
RandalFlagg
4,076 60 05/18/07 10:27 PM
by Redstorm
* P J O'Rourke on foreign policy Phred 821 5 09/28/04 10:40 AM
by hound
* Read this BOOK: The Isreal Lobby and US Foreign Policy HighTek 620 3 05/22/08 06:11 PM
by Luddite
* New Foreign Policy Coalition Warns of US 'Empire-Building' Zahid 443 3 10/28/03 02:29 PM
by Xlea321
* New York Times on Obama's Foreign Policy Team
( 1 2 all )
Madtowntripper 2,065 21 12/03/08 02:38 AM
by zouden
* American voters lose faith in Bush's foreign policy
( 1 2 all )
Zahid 1,365 20 10/14/03 08:57 PM
by Zahid
* Huckabee's foreign policy knowledge questioned; repeated errors johnm214 570 9 12/29/07 03:25 AM
by downforpot
* US foreign policy.
( 1 2 3 4 5 6 all )
Anonymous 3,526 104 01/24/03 01:29 AM
by GazzBut

Extra information
You cannot start new topics / You cannot reply to topics
HTML is disabled / BBCode is enabled
Moderator: Prisoner#1, Enlil
768 topic views. 1 members, 2 guests and 5 web crawlers are browsing this forum.
[ Toggle Favorite | Print Topic | Stats ]
Search this thread:
Mycohaus
Please support our sponsors.

Copyright 1997-2016 Mind Media. Some rights reserved.

Generated in 0.081 seconds spending 0.005 seconds on 14 queries.