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Offlinered1
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Registered: 08/07/01
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ADHD in adults
    #1465953 - 04/17/03 01:58 AM (14 years, 3 months ago)

Does this sound familiar sound like you ?

For years, health professionals believed the signs and symptoms of ADHD vanished by the time a child became a teenager, with no long-lasting effects. Now they know that as many as two out of three children will continue to battle the disorder into adulthood. In addition, they are finding that an increasing number of adults who were misdiagnosed with other psychiatric conditions (such as a learning disability or attitude problem) or who went undiagnosed through childhood and adolescence actually have ADHD. For these individuals, ADHD can wreak havoc with personal relationships and pose problems at work; they also may be prone to substance abuse and depression. But with proper treatment, adults can learn to harness and capitalize on the extra energy and ingenuity often associated with the disorder.
To diagnose ADHD in adults, practitioners conduct a thorough review of their childhood, take a detailed behavioral history and assess their academic and job performance. Family relationships and the nature and quality of friendships are evaluated. Sometimes family members are asked to help identify symptoms or behaviors consistent with the disorder.

Interestingly, some adults who do not have ADHD may label themselves as having the disorder, even though they did not exhibit its disabling symptoms during childhood -- a prerequisite for the diagnosis. This social phenomenon puts some adults at significant risk for a misdiagnosis. Meanwhile, women may be underdiagnosed because of a pervasive belief that girls do not develop ADHD.



Symptoms of ADHD in adulthood mirror those most commonly noted in childhood.


Adults with ADHD are at particular risk for low self-esteem or increased frustration. They also are likely to struggle on the job due to difficulties with staying focused or organized.


Many adults may have been previously misdiagnosed with other psychiatric or behavior conditions or may have been incorrectly labeled as having a personality or character disorder.


Counseling can help adults understand how ADHD may have contributed to the challenges they've faced through the years in personal relationships and work performance.


Stimulants often effectively manage the symptoms of ADHD in adults. Sometimes antidepressants can alleviate depression or the symptoms of co-existing disorders such as anxiety or obsessive-compulsive disorder.


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InvisibletrendalM
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Re: ADHD in adults [Re: red1]
    #1466099 - 04/17/03 03:05 AM (14 years, 3 months ago)

Yeah, sounds like me.

But it's not a disorder, it's a gift  :wink:


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OfflineGWAR
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Re: ADHD in adults [Re: trendal]
    #1491380 - 04/25/03 12:28 AM (14 years, 3 months ago)

i gots dat, and dey gimme funny orange n black pills to treat em... i didnt like em, they made me feel speedy but they also makes yer dick shrivel. BUt the crack head at the end of my street cant get enuff of them!


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OfflineSuperSpun
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Re: ADHD in adults [Re: GWAR]
    #1491596 - 04/25/03 01:54 AM (14 years, 3 months ago)

adhd is bullshit.


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OfflineJackal
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Re: ADHD in adults [Re: SuperSpun]
    #1491952 - 04/25/03 04:00 AM (14 years, 3 months ago)

I too am sceptical of ADHD. It never used to be a problem until someone invented it to explain childrens bad behaviour. My nephew alledgedly has it and as a result his Mother gets disability living allowance, which makes me mad. My Father has an artificial hip, bad athritis and multiple sclerosis and is only entitled to the same benefits.  :mad:

In my view ADHD has another name: "Lack Of Discipline" and it can be cured: with a smacked arse, no tea, no pocket-money, and a months grounding.

I hope I haven't offended, its like I said: I am very sceptical of this issue!  :grin:


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InvisibletrendalM
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Re: ADHD in adults [Re: Jackal]
    #1493822 - 04/25/03 05:53 PM (14 years, 3 months ago)

I'll say it again:

It's not a disorder, disease, or problem...it's a gift.

They just don't want you to know it.


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OfflineUrQuattro
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Re: ADHD in adults [Re: trendal]
    #1494152 - 04/25/03 08:47 PM (14 years, 3 months ago)

ok, first of all, for some people it is not a gift, it is a true disorder.

the biggest problem is that in gifted adults, the normal indications of giftedness are almost indestinguishable from the characteristics of add... the difference is in the motivation behind the 'symptoms'...

and, anyone who says that add is bs obviously doesnt have any clue what it is like to have to deal with the symptoms.

yes, it is overdiagnosed. and yes, sometimes it is used as an overbroad diagnosis for a poorly behaved child. BUT, for kids that actually have the problem, it is NOT bs. it can be incredibly demoralizing and debilitating. and, when people dispute its very existence, that makes those suffering from it feel even worse...

so, be reasonable. yes, it is overdiagnosed. yes, sometimes incredibly intelligent people are misdiagnosed. and yes, there are some children for whom this is a true disability.

now, that being said. here is a paper i wrote about my thoughts on add...




"Societal Deficit Disorder"

I have always been the misfit, the teased child, the outcast; nothing made sense. I could not even fit in during class time. Nothing teachers said ever seemed to sink in to my mind. I tried as hard as possible to memorize math problems, grammar, history, and all subjects presented, without success. Memorization and rote work seemed beyond my capabilities. It was not that I could not understand the information; actually, the information itself was simple to me. The problem was concentration on repetitive, seemingly unnecessary work that did nothing to teach me the knowledge I craved. I consistently scored among the highest in the nation on standardized tests, but my grades did not reflect my potential. Homework seemed useless to me. Why should I take work home to learn something I already knew, just so that I could demonstrate that knowledge to my teacher? Is that not what tests are for? Why should I memorize a given example when the concept is what I was interested in learning? Why was every bit of everyday life so overwhelming, and yet abstract reasoning and logic so consistently fluent and native to my consciousness?

Some teachers suggested that I simply work harder, implying that laziness prevented me from scholastic success. I replied that I knew not how to try harder. I would attempt to do the homework, only to be unable, despite all my conscious effort, to complete the assignments. Unwillingness to work was not the issue; inability to do their work was the problem. This point was proven upon encountering high school biology. For the first time, a teacher seemed to understand how to teach to me. Memorization was mostly unnecessary; homework assignments taught concepts, not examples. Testing and in-class participation carried the most weight in grading. For the first time, I was legitimately challenged to do well in a class. The result was that I received the highest percentage grade in the history of his course at the end of each semester. It took years for me to realize exactly why this change in my performance occurred, and subsequently to understand the answer to the questions I posed as a younger child.

Answers came in the discovery of the Meyers-Briggs Type Index (MBTI) personality typing system. This system tests an individual and uses eight different functions to describe their typical behavior and thought patterns. Each person is asked a series of questions on how they perceive themselves, ranging from how they feel in crowds, to how they feel about facts versus truth. The cumulative data add up to one of sixteen personality types, consisting of four main functions each.

The first function is Extraverted (E) versus Introverted (I). Many have the connotations that these are the differences between outgoing and shy when, actually, it is quite possible to be a shy extravert, and an outgoing introvert. Mentally and behaviorally, extraverts focus on the external world, while the introvert focuses on their internal world.

The second function is iNtuition (N) versus Sensing (S), and refers to the method a person uses to gather information. Intuition is described as an ?irrational? characteristic. It describes leaps in thought leading to insights that do not seem to follow obvious, rational, concrete steps. The converse of this function is Sensing, referring to a person?s ability to gather information about the world through their five senses, and interpret this information literally.

The third function described in this system is Thinking (T) versus Feeling (F). This function simply describes the primary thought processes of the individual. A ?T? based person thinks in terms of rationality and non-emotional judgements. They will base their decisions on what seems to make sense in a logical way. ?F? types tend to make value decisions based on what feels right emotionally.

The final function is Judging (J) versus Perceiving (P). This function describes the person?s attitude toward the external world. Judging types want consistency, schedules, or to establish order. Perceiving types tend to be extremely flexible, dislike schedules, and want to leave decisions open-ended and spontaneous.

I found that personality types are not evenly distributed throughout the population; only 1% share mine: INTP. This discovery explained my inability to find others whom I could identify with, vindicated my self-image, and confirmed my goals, thoughts, and ideals to be ?normal.?

Delving deeper into the implications for these results, I became intrigued by Attention Deficit Disorder, or ADD, as I showed nearly every ADD characteristic, yet according to the MBTI, I was perfectly healthy and normal. How is it possible to be simultaneously normal and dysfunctional? This paradox sparked an intuitive leap, leading me to the thought that individuals with ADD are not necessarily deficient in attention, but that mainstream society is deficient in ability to cope with those who think differently.

Examining the inherent behavior characteristics of ?NP? types, and especially ?INPs,? many similarities to those personalities diagnosed with ADD become clear. Impulsivity with thoughts leading to disorganization, inattention for ?boring? activities or memorization, internal perfectionism, and underachievement are just a few of the many traits shared among these types (Keirsey, ADD Hoax). In addition, the overwhelming prevalence of the SJ type, who thrive on rote memorization, following schedules, rules, and generally enforcing structure, shows the first inklings of why a diagnosis of disability would even be conceived for those rare ?NP? personalities.

By nature, ?J? types tend to be unwilling to accept views other than their own. They make decisions based on what they know and see, but unfortunately do not typically accept differences as valid. Life becomes an either/or situation; there can be no two rights, only a right and a wrong. So, given that the overwhelming majority of the populace shares these characteristics, one can see that teachers, psychologists, parents and governments would have a large number of judging types present. They make the decisions about school curriculum, the decisions regarding mental disability diagnoses, raise children who they are unable to identify with, and are those who pass laws controlling each of the former parties. If they are unwilling to see past their own perspectives on how life should and should not progress, then the minority, those who do not function similarly mentally, will be stifled and trodden upon.

ADD is typically treated with amphetamines, and chemically related drugs. These drugs increase the ability for a person to focus by giving the perception that the task at hand is overly interesting, as well as causing the person to desire more structure and order. They tend to increase obsessive tendencies as well as impulse control, which leads to this desire for order in the external world. In effect, amphetamines change the personalities of these individuals to fit the masses. Only after these drugs have taken effect is the majority able to accept them and subsequently been given the ability to learn and to function in a ?normal? way. Unfortunately, these drugs are also very dangerous in the long-term. They are known neurotoxins, and can have extreme detrimental effects to chronic users. As David Keirsey writes, ?And make no mistake about the power of Ritalin to disable and eventually shrink the brain. It differs little in its destructive effects from cocaine and the amphetamines . . . ?

As those who control society, especially the medical and educational communities, influence the definitions of what normal is and what it is not, any deviation from their standard will be considered a deficiency of some kind, and in turn, disorders will be created in order to explain these differences. Instead of embracing the fact that every type of personality is needed to run this world, society is turning a blind eye toward those who are different, and attempting to train them, either through behavior modification or drugs, to fit with the established norm. This practice must stop in order to allow the development of each person as a true individual, and all must learn to accept that humans differ not only in skin color, sexual preference, and gender, but also in thought processes.


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InvisibletrendalM
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Re: ADHD in adults [Re: trendal]
    #1496771 - 04/26/03 10:38 PM (14 years, 3 months ago)

Believe what you will, man  :smirk:


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OfflineI_Fart_Blue
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Re: ADHD in adults [Re: UrQuattro]
    #1497277 - 04/27/03 04:01 AM (14 years, 3 months ago)

Fellow 1%'er here. I liked your paper a lot. I struggled through high school. A lot of my teachers were never able to understand why I did so poorly despite my apparent intelligence advantage over most, if not all, of my classmates. I never found the motivation to do much in any of my classes, and only challenged would I exert much effort. It wasn't until I turned 20, when I returned from a college hiatus, that I realized how to play the "game" and began to do well in school.

I was classified a while ago as an INTP, though it had been long since forgotten about until your post. I wasn't sure if I remembered correctly so I went and took the test again. Definately INTP. I just stumbled across intp.org, some really interesting information, especially http://www.intp.org/job.html.  I have always been a very analytical person. and as a former Computer Science major, and now Economics major, I was not surprised to find these items on the list, and even cracked a smile when I saw that an Economist was on the list of jobs likely to be enjoyed by an INTP. Racecar drive wasn't on the list, sorry. :wink:

It has always been my suspicion that I was either ADD or ADHD (I'm not really sure of the difference, nor am I really interested). It's just been the way my brain has always worked, and I've gotten used to it. There's nothing wrong with me, and there never has been. Thank the lord my parents were wise enough to recognize this too.

Thanks for a good read and the reminder that I'm a freak.  :grin: 


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"A study of the history of opinion is a necessary preliminary to the emancipation of the mind. I do not know which makes a man more conservative-to know nothing but the present, or nothing but the past." -John Maynard Keynes


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OfflineUrQuattro
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Re: ADHD in adults [Re: I_Fart_Blue]
    #1498247 - 04/27/03 05:49 PM (14 years, 3 months ago)

hehe... yeah, the racecar driver thing is me reveling in my 'S' tendencies... though, interestingly, i use my intuition to read 'in between the lines' as far as how the cars are changing position on the road... so, racecar driver can definitely work with intp, but you just gotta be really in touch with the 's' side of ya too.

thank you for the compliments on my paper, i appreciate that. im glad that you enjoyed it.

i like to switch modes alot.... it keeps my entire personality developed. i go through periods where i try to get really abstracted, and then i go through periods where i try to really engage the physical world...

its all a cycle...

yeehaw, on the road of life, baby.


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True wisdom is the knowledge that nothing is impossible except for absolute knowledge.


Edited by UrQuattro (04/27/03 05:50 PM)


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Offlinejimcon202000
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Re: ADHD in adults [Re: UrQuattro]
    #1499012 - 04/27/03 11:22 PM (14 years, 3 months ago)

trendal ........ it may be a gift to you but  to the people that do "suffer" it is a very real problem.  it goes beond a short attention span and drifting off in a silly manner.  it makes it very hard to get very inportant tasks done in the course of your day/life ..... if you benifet from it then that is great but go easy on the people that have to battle it 

peace  :smile: 


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InvisibletrendalM
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Re: ADHD in adults [Re: jimcon202000]
    #1499287 - 04/28/03 12:52 AM (14 years, 3 months ago)

You have to make it what you want.
Not let it controll you.

Not let drugs controll you.

Trust me, I know.


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OfflineI_Fart_Blue
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Re: ADHD in adults [Re: UrQuattro]
    #1499411 - 04/28/03 01:30 AM (14 years, 3 months ago)

Intersting you mention switching modes, as I've gotten older, grown up some, I've started pushng myself to become more extroverted. It's still a lot of work for me though, and it wears me down. I often find that following a situation in which I am forced to be more extroverted, or I force myself, that I become very introverted.


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"A study of the history of opinion is a necessary preliminary to the emancipation of the mind. I do not know which makes a man more conservative-to know nothing but the present, or nothing but the past." -John Maynard Keynes


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InvisibletrendalM
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Re: ADHD in adults [Re: I_Fart_Blue]
    #1500184 - 04/28/03 10:42 AM (14 years, 3 months ago)

Is being introverted a bad thing?


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OfflineSuperSpun
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Re: ADHD in adults [Re: trendal]
    #1500311 - 04/28/03 11:29 AM (14 years, 3 months ago)

You guys are lieing to yourselfs. ADHD is bullshit. Doctors have told me and almost everyone that I know that we have ADHD. We all agree that It is bullshit. Just another way for pharmacutical companys to make more money. Just like Paxil. Paxil is such bullshit. I know so many people that have been prescribed paxil, and it is bullshit too. You people that think you need adderol or ritalin or paxil for that matter are fuckin panzies that are looking for an easy way to make their lifes better. But in reality everyone has these same feelings. These feelings are a part of everyones life.


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OfflineSuperSpun
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Re: ADHD in adults [Re: SuperSpun]
    #1500315 - 04/28/03 11:31 AM (14 years, 3 months ago)

Its like these paxil comercials, "do you feel sad, stressed, depression, or anxiety?"
YES!!!! Everyone has these feelings. It is called life.


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OfflineI_Fart_Blue
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Re: ADHD in adults [Re: SuperSpun]
    #1500471 - 04/28/03 01:05 PM (14 years, 3 months ago)

Support Group Central is intended for serious discussion only, and off-topic or abusive posts will not be tolerated. When offering advice, please make an effort to be as helpful and supportive as possible. Remember, you're talking to real people with real problems and you need to take them seriously.

If you have no interest in following the forum guidlines, please do not post here.


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"A study of the history of opinion is a necessary preliminary to the emancipation of the mind. I do not know which makes a man more conservative-to know nothing but the present, or nothing but the past." -John Maynard Keynes


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OfflineUrQuattro
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Re: ADHD in adults [Re: trendal]
    #1500701 - 04/28/03 03:07 PM (14 years, 3 months ago)

Quote:

Is being introverted a bad thing?




no, its not.


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OfflineUrQuattro
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Re: ADHD in adults [Re: SuperSpun]
    #1500707 - 04/28/03 03:08 PM (14 years, 3 months ago)

Quote:

You guys are lieing to yourselfs. ADHD is bullshit. Doctors have told me and almost everyone that I know that we have ADHD. We all agree that It is bullshit. Just another way for pharmacutical companys to make more money. Just like Paxil. Paxil is such bullshit. I know so many people that have been prescribed paxil, and it is bullshit too. You people that think you need adderol or ritalin or paxil for that matter are fuckin panzies that are looking for an easy way to make their lifes better. But in reality everyone has these same feelings. These feelings are a part of everyones life.




yeah... ok, whatever...

the part that you are not understanding is that, yes, everyone has these feelings to a certain degree... BUT, the time when it becomes a legitimate problem is when those feelings significantly impact the quality of life of the person experiencing them.


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Offlinecanid
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Re: ADHD in adults [Re: UrQuattro]
    #1510463 - 05/01/03 06:39 AM (14 years, 2 months ago)

i was diagnosed with ADD [and TS] as a child. the school board threatened to kick me out of school if my parents didn't put my on meds. the meds made it worse and i eventualy grew out of it for the most part, but the fidgety nervousness still causes me some problems, including contributing to and inability to sleep untill i am physicaly exhausted.

have you who would discredit ADD/ADHD considered that the problem has existed before a name was given to it, and it did "...used to be a problem..." before "...someone invented it to explain childrens bad behaviour.".

there have always been children who have been seemingly incapable of behaving in accordance with the rest of the academic and social world, not restricted to the impact of the disorder in question.

in any event, if any of you, opiophobic as you may be, feel the need to criticise someone elses inadiquacies, percieved or otherwise, do it somewhere else, or do it constructively, in accordance with the rules of this forum.


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